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RIPPLE BRANCH 
eUlLFORD AVE, 



I 

1 




1982 RIPARIAN 

Broad Ripple High School 

1115 Broad Ripple Ave. 

Indianapolis, Indiana 46220 

Volume 57 




Clashing views change for better 



Somehow the finality of 
summer appeared all too 
soon and another school 
year, which had once been 
depicted hazily in students' 
minds, became sharply more 
distinctive. By the end of August, 
the school had started to stir 
again 

It murmured with reawakened 
activity and life began within. 
Broad Ripple High School awoke 
with the approach of school and 
the routine of book rental, locker 
selection, and schedule conflicts 
repeated itself 

But all was not routine. With 
the closing of Shortridge High 
School, Broad Ripple received 300 



POOL PARTY Basking in the 

sun. Kirk Britlain takes a break from 
the afternoon festivities al the 
Masgiie .ind Mime, and Thespian 
pi( rfic 



new students. Hostilities, regret, 
and weariness had all evolved 
during "The School Closing 
Ordeal " and Shortridge and 
Ripple students eyes one another 
cautiously. The realization that 
they would be united in one 
school on Broad Ripple Avenue 
sank in. 

Summer sun, jobs, and 
vacations served as a three-month 
balm to anxieties and anger 
between the two student bodies. 
Yet as September looked nearer, 
many wondered what would be 
the outcome of doubling up. 

New students and a performing 
arts program offered the chance 
for the students to grasp new 



opportunities and make new 
friends — as long as the first 
step was taken. 

The year presented itself in a 
different style and light than ever 
before, setting the precedent to 
create a winning combination 



THATS ENTERTAINMENT 

I inci) up dt the Golden Siiu|er 
picnic, new memheis prfpjre to 
present a skit 




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Contents 




OPENING 


2 


STUDENT LIFE 


6 


SPORTS 


.24 


ACTIVITIES 


54 


ALBUM 


102 


ADS 


140 


CLOSING 


166 






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2/Opening 




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ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK 

Rplurnincj tor a ddy to the Fltll^'^, the 
?Oth C'i'nturv c IdSb bops dt .1 so< k 
hop in the (jifls' ijvni 



PIED PIPERS During the annudi 

Penrod Day celebrations at Oldhelds. 
crowds gather to listen to one of the 
many musical groups 

SCHOOL SPIRIT Displaying 

school pride when threatened to be 
closed, BRHS students decorated the 
building with orange and black 
slogans 



Opening/3 



FENDER-BENDER Bumpei 

stickers and other paraphernalia 
represented Shoriridge pride long 
after the school was closed 

PRESCHOOL BLUES Listening 

to various speakers at a Shortridge 
tea. new students attended preschool 
functions to acquaint themselves 
with Broad Ripple 





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POMPON POWER During dn 

outside rehearsal. Crystal Miller 
practices new pompon routine steps 
With the fall athletic activities, after 
school practices were not uncommon 
sights. 

TOGETHER Veteran players 

Nick Law and Randall Banks from 
Broad Ripple and Shortridge. 
respectively, united for the 1981 
football campaign Banks was one of 
four team Rocket captains 



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BR + Shortridge = crowded halls 



1600 + 300=1900. Chaotic 
halls demonstrated that in 
theory this equation seemed 
simple but when applied to 
people proved quite difficult. 
The goal of 1900 students: 
to cover the length of an 
entire building in five 
minutes, dodge hundreds of 
other hurrying bodies and 
make it to class on time. 
Even agile "hall-wise" seniors 
found their darting techniques 
useless against the multitudes 
of people. 



TESTING 12 3 ... Attempting to 
get the attention of the audience, 
Rachel Riegel prepares to speak 
during the Shortridge Tea. The Tea 
was planned to help parents and 
students become acquainted with 
Ripple. 




Stampedes of people and 
muddied schedules took back 
seat to the undercurrents of 
emotion that followed 
throughout the school. The 
300 new "pupils" transformed 
from mere figures on paper 
to real-life people. Changing 
the newspaper to the 
"Riparian-Echo," moving the 
S.P.A. and creating a "new 
BRHS" seemed minor 
concessions to those students 
who had lost a school. 

Freshman and Shortridge 
teas, club meetings and 
athletic events rotated around 
involving new students. A 
distinction remained, however, 
between "Ripplites and 
"Ridgers." Blue and white 
inevitably popped-up on Black 
and Orange days, and 
Ripplites begrudged Ridgers 
for hanging on to the past. 

Gradually a combination 
began to form, and instead of 
swallowing Shortridge alive, 
B.R.H.S. expanded and grew. 
The equation altered from 
one of digits to that of ideas 
and people. 



PIN-GP . . . Popping-up on 
sweatshirts, jackets and buttons, the 
slogan "Shortridge Is Indianapolis" 
represented the Pride of former 
Ridgers. 




"When I first came here, it 
was too large, and I had 
trouble getting to classes. I 
am adjusting very slowly." 
— Candy Edmonson, sr. 

"I feel I will never be able 
to love any school as much 
as I love Shortridge." — 
Anne Daniell. jr. 

"People here seemed 
friendly: I seemed to be lost, 
and they (Ripple people) 
showed me the way." — 
Kelli Little, jr. 

"People were more liberal 
at Ridge; there's more 
discipline here it seems. But 
I do like BR." — Chuck 
Rice, jr. 

"I want everyone to know 
where I come from, and what 
1 stand for." — Anna 
Harper, jr. 

"I don't think I'll ever 
adjust completely. Deep 
inside I'll always be 'Blue 
and white'." — Paul 
Galloway, jr. 

"I like BR this year a lot 
because of the new activities 
such as performing arts, but 
I don't like the violence." — 
Patsy Briscoe, sr. 

"I think the people that 
chose to come to BR this 
year from 'Ridge are really 
neat; they're very 
interesting." — Betsi Wiley, 
soph. 

"I think that a lot of SHS 
people are making the 
transition to BR, but some 
are negative." — Jim 
Durrett, soph. 

"It is a cattle farm of 
students." — Tracy Swatts, 
sr. 

"Broad Ripple doesn't 
seem like a family anymore. 
Now there are too many 
people to know everybody. I 
would like everyone to be a 
family again." — Monica 
Bryant, soph. 



1 



BALLOO 

sketch in 

downtown, Liz White and Susan 

Appel participate with OBRC in the 

annual IPS May Day celebration. 



Opening/5 



EYE OF THE STORM 

Surrounded b\ piles of magazines 
and papers. Susan Appel finishes up 
her daily assignments while attending 
Journalism Institute at ICJ 




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HERE'S MUD IN YOUR EYE 

Participating in the annual Golden 
Singers picnic. Rick Hassler gets 
tossed in the mud by fellow 
members The mud wrestling is a 
tradition carried out by Golden 
Singers every year 

RISE AND SHINE Starting out 

his daily routine. Steve Hill wakes up 
bright and early to make sure he's at 
school on time 




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6/ Student Life 





STUDENT LIFE 




'Junkie' kicks habit 



He's not just another 
addict; he's a special case. 
He's been in group therapy 
for months, but nothing's 
cured him yet. it's taken him 
a long time to admit to his 
group, "I'm a school junkie". 

He looks like a normal high 
school student on the surface; 
yet when observed closely, 
signs of addiction are 
obvious. Just mention the 
word "homework" and his 
pulse becomes rapid, his eyes 
watery; "after school 
rehearsal " sends him into 
withdrawal throes. His life 
rotates around school, and 
sometimes 8-3 just doesn't 
satisfy him. Announcements 
are his fix for the day; while 
his fifth hour messanger duty 
keeps him going. 



It all began his sophomore 
year when he started staying 
after school for rehearsals, 
deadlines, and after school 
meetings. Before long, his 
locker became home, and 
cafeteria food began to seem 
enticing. His friends knew he 
was addicted, but he wouldn't 
admit it to himself. 

Although he's now on the 
road to recovery, snow days 
still fill him with fear, and the 
thought of summer vacation 
horrifies him. He'll never be 
totally cured . . . he's a 
school junkie. 



FLYING HIGH Playing around at 

Broad Ripple Park. Ed Carter shows 
off his great talent for jumping off 






*'JJIi 




BLAST OFF Reverting back to 

his childhood. Michael Garmany finds 
out what its really like to be an 



Student Life/7 



I.P.S. school closings 



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MARSHALL SAVED, SHORTRIDE CLOSED 



Due to budget cuts and 
declining enrolinnent in early 
1981, the Board of 
Commissioners appointed a 
Task Force to evaluate the 
10 public high schools and 
make closing 
recommendations. 

Made up of local 
businessmen and dignitaries, 
the Task Force rated the 
schools in order of closing 
preference. Crispus Attucks, 
Broad Ripple, Manual, and 
Tech topped the list. 

A consolidation of six high 
schools was recommended. 
The plan was to merge 
Shortridge and BRHS at 
Shortridge while Attucks 
merged with Northwest. Also 
recommended was the 
merging of Arlington with 
Marshall at an undecided 
location. 

The Task Force proposed 
the leasing or sale of the 
Education Center as well as 
the sale of the BRHS land 



track and the renovation of 
Attucks for IPS offices. 

The school board met Feb. 
24, 1981, to review the Task 
Force's recommendations and 
listen to citizen rebuttals. 
Early Wednesday morning 
after a lengthy meeting, the 
Board voted to consolidate 
Broad Ripple and Shortridge 
at BRHS and leave Attucks 
open. 

Although the Task Force 
had made recommendations, 
the Board chose to do 
otherwise. Angry words 
targeted the Board members 
for their rejection of the Task 
Force's recommendations. 
Both Shortridge and Marshall 
patrons appealed the decision. 

Several days later at the 
regular school board meeting, 
the decision to close Marshall 
was reversed; yet the verdict 
to close Shortridge stood. 
Four parents of Shortridge 
students — Margaret L. 
Coleman, Rosetta Martin, 



Franklin D. Nash, and Waiter 
L. Peacock — filed suit 
against the school board on 
May 5, 1981. They claimed 
that "the determination to 
close Shortridge . . . was a 
denial to the plaintiffs' 
children of due process of 
law." 

The suit did not come to 
trial before the beginning of 
the school year, leaving the 
decision unchanged. 

With the consoldation of 
Broad Ripple and Shortridge 
at BRHS, certain adjustments 
became necessary. WViether 
these adjustments were to be 
made smoothly, only time 
would tell. 



WE ARE . B.R. . . . 

Waiting to enter the 
Education Center, BR 
students rally outside. The 
students made posters and 
wore orange and black to 
enforce their views on the 
closing. 



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DEVILISH THOUGHTS 

. . . Before joining the 
caravan downtown, 
students decorated busses 
and cars with posters and 
streamers in their efforts to 
save BR. 

WHERE'S SANTA 
CLAUS? As a last 

attempt to save the school. 
Shortridge students showed 
their sorrow at the decision 
to close their school. 



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BACKED INTO A CLOSET . . . 

With no where else to sit, Jenny 
Bigham, Kenny Dixon, Michelle 
Essenberg, and Susan Glunt 
huddle together in a closet 
downtown at the Education 
Center. 



8/ School Closings 



cause angry uproar 




Shortridge loses battle 
to live; who's next? 



When Shortridge High 
School was closed, it 
represented the end of a 
long struggle by SHS 
students, parents, and 
community members to 
keep a tradition alive. 

The falling enrollment, 
therefore a declining budget, 
made it necessary to close a 
certain number of schools. 
Although two high schools 
previously had been slated 
to close, only one was 
decided upon: Marshall was 
saved, Shortridge was not. 

The SHS fight did not 
simply begin in late 
February, but had been an 
ongoing battle for years. 
When the school board 
voted to close Marshall and 



Shortridge, the chance that 
SHS would remain open in 
the fall was a slim 
possibility. Candlelight vigils, 
slogans, rallies, and 
community support all tried 
to prevent what seemed 
inevitable. 

Perhaps the saddest 
aspect is that the chances 
are good that the entire 
ordeal could be repeated 
next year, causing more 
grueling weeks of debate 
and discouraged, tired 
students. 

HIGH RISE . . . Despite graduation 
in June, the class of 1981 places a 
SAVE RIPPLE banner on top of the 
school's stage so that school spirit 
could be seen from around the 
village. 




School Closings/9 



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AHHHHHH!!! Patrick Wisdom. 

Cjcoujc AiuliTson. and Stanley Smith 
pfdi tut* long hours into the night for 
the mijSK al 

■•START ME UP" Ron Wood. 

Ki-ilti Ric li.iids. and Charlie Watts ol 
thi- Rolling Stones, jam in Chi< ago 
with their new hit single 



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THE GREAT ESCAPE 

i'LL DO IT MONDAY NIGHT' 





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As Broderick Ripple 
greedily eyed the controls on 
the TV set, he knew that if 
he didn't control his urge 
now, he never would. Monday 
was his only free night; he 
had to do his homework. Yet 
the TV just sat there begging 
him to turn it on. 

Finally, Brod. giving into 
his temptations, swore he'd 
watch only one show. The 
next thing he knew it was 
8:15 Tuesday morning and he 
was surrounded by piles of 
unfinished homework. 

For the tempted Brod. 
weeknights often governed his 
weekend activities. With 
musical rehearsal Tuesday, 
ROTC practice and 
newspaper deadline 
Wednesday, a football 
scrimmage game Thur 



and his job Friday night, Brod 
had no choice other than to 
set aside Saturday to finish 
his homework. 

Yet when Saturday rolled 
around, Brod was faced with 
a major decision: What to do. 

Since his choices were 
infinite, Brod found it difficult 
to decide. With a party at a 
friend's house, a concert at 
Market Square Arena, and six 
movies at Glendale to choose 
from, he quickly forgot his 
homework. 

He was out of the house 
and heading for the action 
when he realized that he 
should be doing his 
homework. 

"Oh well, " he thoi- jnt, 'I'll 
have time to do it Monday 
night. " 




ROCKIN- INTO THE NIGHT 

Junior Doug Miller spends an evening 
practicing some new songs on his 
guitar. 



Nightlife 



THE GREAT ESCAPE 

School blues hit BR 



Dear Tonya, 

I think Im dying of 
boredom. I wish I would've 
brought a magazine with me 
to class. Actually, there's 
enough good reading on this 
desk to last a lifetime. 
According to it, five people 
are dating the same girl! 

The teacher made me spit- 
out my gum this period. Little 
does the next unsuspecting 
student know, but I've hidden 
it in a secret place! He may 



TABLE MANNERS Watching a 

disturbance in the cafeteria, several 
students pause during their lunch. 



never move from this seat 
again. 

Gym was awful today, i 
forgot that I'd left my clothes 
in my locker and they were 
mildewed. 

During lunch, I dropped my 
tray and all my food fell on 
the floor. 1 went ahead and 
ate the pork fritter anyway. 
Surprisingly, it tasted better 
than usual. Whoops! There's 
the bell, I'll finish this later 



HANGIN' OUT Many Broad 

Ripple students found it necessary to 
step outside for a breath of fresh air 
during the course of the day. 




AMERICAN GRAFFITI Students 

often wrote reflections and 
ponderings on their desks during 
class although it was against school 
rules. 



HO HUM Spacing out during her 

advanced composition class. Cathy 
Hannah takes a break during the 
rigors of the day to daydream about 
the upcoming weekend. 




THE LONE READER Taking 

advantage of a warm, fall afternoon. 
a lone student quietly reads outside 
th\e school building. 



MIND BOGGLER Trying to 

tackle tfie Rubik's Cube, a favorite 
"toy" of Ripplites. Tim Johnson 
takes a shortcut in finding the 
answer by taking the cube apart The 
Rubik's cube was often seen during 
study halls and lunch periods 




ALTERED THOGGHTS Instead 

of paying attention in class. Michael 
Lazar. Kathy Stahl. Lisa Rose. 
Jacques Hammonds, and James 
Schuck carry on a conversation of 
their own during government class. 



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THE GREAT ESCAPE 



Summer thoughts blind students 



That long awaited day that 
hundreds of nninds yearned 
and hoped for was drawing 
near. It was so close they 
could taste it. With the first 
breath of fresh air. 1600 
bodies came running through 
the school doors after nine 
months of captivity. 

Of course, there were those 
unlucky few who were left to 
serve probation in summer 
school, while others went on 
their merry way. Beaches, 
summer camps, jobs, and 



parties glistened like rare 
jewels just waiting to be 
worn. The opportunities 
blinded the students with the 
thoughts of never-ending 
enjoyment. There was so 
much to do, and so little time 
to do it. 

Tomorrow soon turned into 
today as the summer came to 



SKYLINE VIEW A favorite 

summer resort for students. Kings 
Island amusement park is constantly 
expanding 



an end. Last-minute activities 
took place; trying to squeeze 
in as much as possible. But 
as usual, the three months of 
fun packed days turned into 
90 days of rest and 
relaxation. 



UPHILL CLIMB While attending 

Lilly Leadership this summer, several 
BR students faced an uphill battle 

AHHH! Preparing to take a dip 

in a neighbor's pool. Clars Danvold 

twirls in air 



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LAST SUPPER Broad Rippl. 

fiolrlen Sint).'rs l-ikf lime out Irr) 
Ific annual pi' nif to r-njoy a l(Ji<|i 



IT'S MAGIC Showing olf his 

,ilhl.-lif dhilitit-s. Scott StM-le takes 
,iclvant.ige of a warm suttiiiier 
dlli-inoon at MarroM Park 



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ROLLING DOWN THE RIVER 

During the 1981 WMAP Raft 
Race, participants paddle their 
way down White River and end 
up at Broad Ripple Parks boat 
launch. 

GETTING STARTED In the 

early morning hours of the 1981 
Indiana State Fair, contestants 
entered in the hot air balloon race 
prepare their crafts. 



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fy Battle of the styles: prep vs. anti-prep 



The battle raged on. More 
and nnore alligators with 
red slashes through them ran 
rampant across the 
countryside. True preps 
fought back, with their pink 
and green banners waving 
proudly. Although the war 
was not as intense at BRHS, 
the rift between duck shoes 
and oxfords, Rush T-shirts, 
and Colorado hiking boots 



was clear. 

The GQ look added 
variation in style, as many 
Ripplites dressed in baggy 
pants, double-breasted 
jackets, and wingtip shoes. 
Playboy bunny emblems 
added an extra fair to the GQ 
jackets. 

Stylish cowboy boots took 
on a new dimension with 
billowy skirts and fringed 



vests. Cowboy hats could be 
seen at parties and ball 
games, since they were not 
allowed in school. 

Aspects of punk were 
evident in students everyday 
wear. Although not many 
dressed in pure punk 
fashions, it was seen in 
classrooms and corridors. 
This was proven by bright- 
colored bandanas around 



short-topped hair, retro 
fashions, and buttons showing 
names of favorite punk 
bands. 

Showing their pride, 
preppies wore buttons 
exhibiting slogans such as 
"Preppies Need Love Too," 
while anti-preps showed their 
opinion by wearing buttons 
saying "Save the Alligator, 
Eat a Preppie." 

Whether the style was 
prep, western, or punk, it was 
clear that all Ripplites 
expressed their fashion 
preferences by wearing what 
appealed to each individual. 



TAKE YOOR PICK Both preps 

and antipreps expressed their own 
opinions with buttons. Whether it 
was "Save a Gator . . " or "Love a 
Preppie", buttons were a common 
sight. 




OM A MEW WAVE Punking-out 

Andrew Austin presents his version 
of a punk rocker. Punk Isecame 
p>opular during "Punk Day" for 
Homecoming with many "far-out" 
styles. 



ULTRA-PREP Buffy (Ann Cox) 

models the latest in preppie wear. 
Navy blazers, Topsiders, button- 
downs, and pink and green became a 
must for the true preppie. 



16/Fads And Fashions 




Fads And Fashions/ 17 



They're Entertainment 

Oscar-winning actress Sissy 

Spacek 

Kim Carnes of "Bette Davis 

Eyes" fame 

Gary Coleman of TV's 

"Diffrent Strokes" 

soul singer Ray Parker Jr. of 

Raydio 

Broad Ripple alumnus David 

Letterman 

Alan Alda from TV's smash 

"M'A'S'H " 

late-night's talkative Johnny 

Carson 





THE EMMY BLOES After 

sweeping the 1981 Emmy Awards 
the cast of "Hill Street Blues" was 
really smiling. 




IN Television Shows: 


IN Motion Pictures: 


"M*A*S*H" 


"Raiders of the Lost Ark" 


"Hart to Hart" 


"Stripes" 


"Dallas" 


"Heavy Metal" 


"General Hospital" 


"Under the Rainbow" 


OUT Television Shows: 


OUT Motion Pictures: 


"The Dukes of Hazzard" "Monnmie Dearest" ( 


"Dallas" 


"Fear No Evil" [ 


"Mork and Mindy" 


"Saturday the 14th" 


"Best of the West" 


"Stripes" 




PEOPLE'S CHOICE — 





18/Entertainment 




IN Actors and Actresses 
Alan Alda 
Stephanie Powers 
Robert Redford 
Goldie Hawn 
Billy Dee Williams 

OGT Actors and Actresses: 
Brooke Shields 
Larry Hagman 
Farrah Fawcett 
Burt Reynolds 
Bo Derek 



IN Recording Artists: 
Pat Benetar 
Rick Springfield 
REO Speedwagon 
Journey 



OUT Recording Artists: 
Marie Osmond 
Kim Carnes 
Leif Garrett 
KISS 



Indiana Jones hits 

When school opened in 
September, Hollywood had 
just enjoyed its biggest 
money-making summer. 

Indiana Jones had battled 
Nazis and escaped impossible 
traps in "Raiders of the Lost 
Ark," Bond had returned 
better than ever in "For Your 
Eyes Only," and Superman 
had romanced Lois Lane in 
"Superman M" as Bill Murray 
took on the United States 
Army in the smash hit 
"Stripes." 

Alan Alda's "The Four 
Seasons" moved into the top 
ten in gate receipts for the 
year. Elsewhere, film fans 
awaited Warren Beatty's new 
film, "Reds," which had been 
four years in the making. 

Television presented a wide 
variety of new shows that 
became popular. Among the 
most respected was "Hill 
Street Blues," which swept 
the Emmy Awards after 



Indy 



joining "Lou Grant" on CBS. 

Also capturing a large 
audience was the new 
"Magnum P.I." It joined 
"M*A*S*H" and "Diff'rent 
Strokes", which maintained 
their customary high shares 
of the ratings. 

Johnny Carson celebrated 
his 20th year on "The 
Tonight Show". Carson's 
frequent guest host and 
probable successor, David 
Letterman, a Broad Ripple 
graduate, was being 
considered for his own late- 
night show. 

In the world of music, both 
"Bette Davis Eyes" and 
"Endless Love" hit the 
number-one position for nine 
weeks, tying for the best 
selling singles for 1981. 
Meanwhile, Ray Pasrker Jr. 
topped the soul charts with 
his album "A Woman Needs 
Love. " 



CHECKING IT OGT Kenny 

Rogers of country music and TV film 
fame looks over a score written by 
Lionel Richie, a member of the 
Commodores. Richie has written 
many of Roger's songs. 



TOO COOL . . . Thomas Magnum 
(Tom Selleck) in the hit series 
"Magnum P.I." poses beside his red 
Ferrari. The action series, set in 
Ouahu, particularly attracted female 
viewers. 




Community views many changes 



Broad Ripple Village and 
Broad Ripple High School, a 
winning combination for 67 
years, saw some changes this 
year. The addition of new 
students created an exciting 
meaning to the words "Broad 
Ripple." 

New restaurants and shops 
popped up right alongside the 
old as if the Village was going 
through rejuvenation. The 
excitement of exploring the 



businesses sparked the 
curiosity of old Ripplites; and 
the old, new, and the in- 
between created an exciting 
spirit in the new students. 
The Village became an 
afterschool and weekend 
pastime for many. 
Not only did the 
community undergo changes, 
but its namesake, BRHS, 
changed also. As students 
filled the halls of the new and 



improved Broad Ripple High 
School, examining and re- 
examining the building 
became a task for all. 

Despite differences and 
adjustments, Broad Ripple 
Village and High School 
proved that the new and the 
old could get along fine. 




CROSSROADS . . Running through 
Broad Ripple Village. Broad Ripple 
Avenue is crossed by Haverford 
street In front of school. 

BLASTOFF The massive 

structure of steel and wood 
constructed for the children of Broad 
Ripple Village waits patiently. 











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20/Community 



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ALL ABOARD / . Retired from 
duty, Engine 587 sits guarding the 
entrance to Broad Ripple Park. 

RESTAORANT ROW . . . Small 
delicatessens and pastry shops line 
Guilford Avenue. The shops are a 
five-minute walk after school. 





^^^•^gxx: 



■^.-xni^^x.-- 



RIPPLE 



n 




NEITHER RAfN NOR SNOW 

Old and worn the Broad Ripple 
Village sign board still Informs the 
public. 



HOW ABOCJT A SWIM? 

Covering the man made canal, the 
Meridian Street bridge adds a touch 
of class to the villag 



Community/2] 



ON ALERT . . . With growing tension 
in the Middle East, many doubted 
the continuation of peace between 
Egypt and Isreal. 




Year representative of best and worst times 



"The headlines read these 
are the worst of times; people 
lock their doors and hide 
inside." These words, from 
the popular song "The Best 
of Times" by the rock group 
Styx, seemed to apply to the 
world affairs of 1981-82. 

The year opened with 
bloodshed. Twentysix-year-old 
John Hinckley III allegedly 
shot President Ronald Reagan, 
who underwent consequent 
surgery. Press Secretary 
James Brady, also shot, 
suffered worse injury. The 
assassination of Egyptian 
president Anwar Sadat, a 
1979 rHobel Peace Prize 
winner, riveted interest 



towards the Middle East once 
again. 

Another assassination 
attempt occurred this past 
year; Pope John Paul II 
became the victim of an 
alleged Turkish terrorist. 
Hospitalized for several 
months thereafter, the Pope 
returned to the Vatican in 
October. 

Violent disputes between 
Roman Catholics and 
Protestants continued in 
Ireland. Britain's refusal to 
give jailed Irish Republican 
Army members political 
prisoner status triggered a 
hunger strike led by prisoner 
Bobby Sands. 



A Solidarity Day protest 
attracted over 150,000 
demonstrators. The Polish 
Workers' Union strike, for 
whom the American 
Solidarity Day was named, 
continued to protest Polish 
governmental policies. 

Reagan cut back on the 
welfare program and the 
Department of Education, 
while the proposed sale of 
AWACS to the Saudi 
Arabians won in the Senate 
by a vote of 52-48. 

The President's proposal of 
Sandra O'Connor to a 
Supreme Court position 
surprised many. With Senate 
supF>ort, O'Connor became 



the first female Supreme 
Court justice in Gnited States' 
history. 

In Britain, another woman 
inspired headlines; Lady 
Diana Spencer married 
England's Crown Prince 
Charles. The marriage 
sparked British celebration 
and pride, as well as world 
attention. 

Elements of both happiness 
and misfortune prevailed in 
1981-82. Whether the light at 
the end of the tunnel would 
prove to be a ray of sunshine 
securing hope or an 
approaching train suggesting 
doom remained to be seen 
... in 1983. 



22/Current Events 



PRINCELY PAIR . Posing for 
publicity shots, Prince Charles and 
Lady Diana exhibit their famed 
propriety. 



STEPPING INTO HISTORY . . . 

Newly appointed Supreme Court 
Justice Sandra Day O'Conner wears 
the robes of her post. 

THE COST OF LIVING ... The 

postal service Issued another rake 
hike. Increasing the price of a stamp 
from 18C to 20C. 







FACING THE NATION . Despite 
Senate support, President Reagan 
admitted that the U.S. suffered from 
an economic recession. 



MVP: MOST VALUABLE PLAYER? 

. . . Los Angeles Dodger Fernando 
Valenzuela demonstrates his winning 
pitching form. 



FOLLOW THE RED-BRICK ROAD 

. . . Supporting the restoration of 
Indy, President Reagan purchased a 
signature brick for the Circle. 



Current Events/23 



SPORTS 



BR scores with spirit 



Victories, defeats, sweat, 
practices: a word collection 
that brings vivid images to 
any athlete's mind. These 
words came alive again as 
the sports season kicked off 
with football, soccer and 
cross country. November 
brought basketball followed 
by wrestling, volleyball and 
many others. 

Although football and 
basketball drew the largest 
crowds, other sports had their 



BODY BLOCK . . . Jumping to slam 
for a point, varsity volleyball player 
Emily Young blocks the net ball as 
Rene Arnold (50) follows tfie play. 



own devoted fans. Ripple 
offered a little bit of 
everything to anyone 
interested. 

Though BR didn't capture a 
State Championship, the 
sound of the whistle, the 
winning basket and the fight 
song produced the same 
deafening roars as before. 
Players, coaches and fans 
worked together to create 
Ripple spirit and a winning 
combination. 




REACHING OUT . . Striving to 
reacfi tfie ball in time, Larry Monger 
extends his arm for the swing. 

1 AN'A 2 AN'A Warming up for 

a meet, girls' cross country members 
Jenny Shoup and Mary Blome 
stretch in the sun. 





%^. 



%.: 




..oij 



^ a 






■■im 





JACK BE NIMBLE Despite being 

caught in midair, Dennis Bland still 
defends his Brebeuf opponent. 

HOP-A-LONG . . . After being injured 
during varsity play, Terrance 
Crumpton is helped off the field. 





SUSPENSE . . . Watching intently at 
a free throw in the Indnanapolis 
Lutheran game, Mary Taylor (32) 
stands just behind the foul line. 



" ^ w^.- '^t ^^ I I m.^ 



JmA 



WHIPPIT . . . Knowling he is not 
allowed to use his hands, Brett 
Sommers attacks the soccer ball 
with his head. 



Sports/25 



Rocketfest at its best 



A long awaited parade, a 
freezing football game and a 
crowded dance afterwards, 
describe what homecoming 
amounts to year after year. 
The word "homecoming" 
took on a whole new 
meaning, it wasn't just an 
after-school activity, it 
became a time of festivity 
and entertainment, otherwise 
known as Rocketfest. 

Rocketfest, planned by the 
APT and the Student Council, 
gave students a chance to 
show off their skills in many 
carnival games. During the 
festival, a "Battle of the 
Bands" took place in the 
balcony of the gym. Although 
three bands signed up to 
battle it out, only one, 
"Destiny" actually 
participated in the event. 

The festival kept students 
entertained until it was time 
for the big game against the 
Pioneers of Northwest. 
Caught up in the excitement 



of the close game, students 
parents and fans almost 
forgot the freezing 
temperatures. 

During haiftime the Band, 
Majorettes, and Pompon 
corps presented the fans with 
an exciting haiftime show 
including a launched rocket. 
Denise Wynn and Adrian 
Cushenberry were crowned 
homecoming King and Queen 
While the Masque and Mime 
float received the first place 
trophy for the best float, the 
Art Club won an award for 
the most elaborately 
decorated float. 

After a chilling second half, 
the Rockets topped off the 
evening with a narrow victory 
and then rushed off to the 
cafeteria to thaw out during 
the homecoming dance. 

IMNOCENT BYSTANDERS . Vice 
Principal Henry Easter, Mr. Barry 
Patrick, and Principal Donald Glenn 
drink coffee for warmth as they 
watch the homecoming parade pass 
by. 



STANDING ROOM ONLY . 

Waiting for their names to be called, 
the homecoming candidates stand In 
line. Despite the cold temperatures, 
the candidates still paraded. 

FINISHING TOUCHES As 

parade time draws near, Senior Mark 
Dorsey puts final touches on the 
Thespian float. 




HIT THE DECK A Northwest 

runner is sandwiched by two Rocket 
defenders during the homecoming 
game, which Ripple won, 1514. 



26/ Homecoming 



I LOVE A PARADE . . Members of 
Masque and Mime and Thespians 
march steadily on, unaware that they 
are displaying the first-place float. 





ROYAL WEDDING? . After being 
crowned Homecoming King and 
Queen, Denise Wynn and Adrian 
Cushenberry hold their trophies with 
pride. 

I DARE YOG . . . Mac Goode, junior, 
enjoys his once-in-alifetime chance to 
sponge-down Principal Donald Glenn. 



Homecoming/27 



VARSITY 



SEE HOW THEY RUN On his 

THE THIRST QUENCHER way to yet another score. George 

Taking a water break. Michael Murff Black catches one of 12 season 
eyes the action during the Jamboree touchdowns from Cedric Lindsay, 
at Marshall. The patriots defeated the The Rockets defeated the Attuck's 
Rockets by a score of 14 0. Tigers 32 13 



Varsity Football 



13 


Arlington 


15 


6 


Tech 





12 


Lafayette Catholic 


6 


8 


Chatard 


27 


8 


Norh Central 


50 


25 


Howe 


28 


26 


Cathedral 


28 


16 


Warren Central 


19 


15 


Northwest 


14 


32 


Attucks 


13 





( ■ • « ■ • 



- .^v \ .-, f'y*..' ' 







i;?-i ''^^^^^^^^SmiMi^ 



' ,>.Vr-^fft.,. 



VARSITY FOOTBALL — Back Row: 
Curtis Maxey, Kevin Madden, Mike 
Carter, Derrick Toran, Ed Parker, 
Dean Johnson. Ed Carter, Samuel 
Manson, Thurman Montgomery. Fifth 
Row: Anthony Bigsbee, Richard 
Petty, Nick Law, Cedric Lindsay, 
Kevin Carter, Michael Murff, James 
Davis, Julius Adeniyi, Mike Law, 
Alfred Dartis. Fourth Row: Hans 
Meyers, Scott Steele, Ed Franklin, 
Leonard Mosley, George Black, Brian 
Williams. Leon Lewis, Mike Williams, 
Gary Steele, Demetrius Edwards, 
Kent Miller. Third Row: Gary 
Hatcher, Darrell O'Kelley, David 
Latimore, Mike Sherman, William 
Baxter. Mark Webster, Luther Collier, 
Randall Banks, Tim Jackson, Kevin 
Kennedy. Terence Crumpton. Second 



Row: Obbie Williams, Benjamin 
McCutty, Demis Tate, Athletic 
Director Gene Ring, Manager Elliot 
Segal, Asst. Coach John Haynes, 
Asst. Coach John Tremain, Head 
Coach Pat Koers, Asst. Coach Dick 
Orban, Asst. Coach John Newton, 
Asst. Manager Don Clark, Principal 
Don Glenn, Eric Shephard, Mike 
Garrett, David Roberts. Front Row: 
Allen Lee, Leslie Grady, Ronald 
Sanders, Mike Rowland, Eric Wells, 
Will Lenoir, Danny Powell, Albert 
Hayden, Alfonzo Simpson, Trevor 
Murray. 

CATCH ME IF YOU CAN . . . 

Sprinting down the field, David 
Latimore attempts to score a 
touchdown against Warren Central. 




28/ Varsity Football 









Close calls; team stalls 



It was Autumn; that time 
of year again. The time when 
leaves changed color, the 
wind grew cooler and football 
inevitably sprang into action 
across America. 

The Broad Ripple football 
team, however, started their 
season last summer. Hoping 
for a successful season, the 
varsity rocket team struggled 
through "twoa-days" and 
Saturday morning practices 
preparing for the upcoming 
season. 

Head Coach Pat Koers led 
the players onto the grid iron 
in the opener against 
Arlington at home. "Bad 
breaks and lack of 



FREE RIDE . . . After suffering a 
neck injury during the Chartard 
game, varsity player Eric Williams is 
escorted into an ambulance and 
taken to the hospital. 



.^i 



CO 



^^'Mli- 



organization were the causes 
for losing the tough match, 
2018," stated Senior Nick 
Law. 

The varsity squad then 
went on the road to Tech and 
Lafayette Central Catholic 
coming away with two 
stunning victories. The 
Rockets, however, just 
beginning to come into form, 
lost their next five games. 
Howe, Cathedral and Warren 
Central clinched fourth 
quarter victories by less than 
a touchdown. 

The highlight of the season 
came during the homecoming 
game against Northwest when 
the Rockets held off the 
mighty pioneers for an 
exciting one point victory. 
Ripple's varsity gridders 
ended the season by 
devastating the Attucks 
Tigers by a score of 32-13. 
Senior Quarterback Cedric 
Lindsay, the city's top passer, 
led the offense, connecting 
numerous times with Senior 
receiver Michael Murff. Kent 
Miller launched the rushing 
attack, with Senior Dean 
Johnson opening up holes on 
the line of scrimmage. 
Defensively, Eric Williams 
and cornerback Randall 
Banks headed the fight 
against the opposition. 
Randall Banks, a lettering 
Shortridge football player, 
made the transition to Broad 
Ripple successfully by leading 
the team in tackles. "He's a 
hard nosed player and did an 
outstanding job," said Asst. 
Coach John Tremain. 

As the snow began falling 
the varsity football team's 
year was over, it was now 
time for the basketball team 
to take the Ripple limelight. 



^ 



CRaNNNNNCH . . . Scattered about, 
rocket gridders pounch on a 
Catherdral player in a close but 
unsuccessful game. Curtis Maxey 
and Tim Jackson made the tackle. 



Varsity Football/29 



KILL, KILL. KILL! . . . Freshman 
football players converge on a 
helpless running back in an effort to 
stop him. 





-JV Football- 




BR 


Tech 


Op. 


36 


Chatard 





14 


North Central 


20 


6 


Howe 


2 





Cathedral 


14 





Warren Central 


12 





Northwest 


34 





Attucks (forfeit) 


16 







BR 


Op. 


Arlington 


6 


Cathedral 


6 


Tech 


6 


Warren Central 


20 


Chatard 


31 


6 Avon 


16 


8 Howe 





14 Cathedral 


38 


Northwest 


34 



WHERE AM I? Thanks to the 

speed of Freshman Anthrawn 
Wilburn, the Cathedral defender 
never even knew he was passed. 








\ 




^ 



Ai 









WE'VE GOT HIM NOW! Five 

Broad Ripple football players move in 
on the Cathedral ball carrier. 




I 






^ 



«;"..U 



¥-'< 



30/Reserve, Freshman Football 



JV/FROSH 




JV, frosh show promise 



Junior varsity and 
freshman football gave a 
bright outlook for future 
varsity teams. Both teams 
had plenty of talent, but too 
often couldn't pull it together. 

Beating North Central, 6-2, 
and Tech, 3-0, the JV team 
demonstrated that it had 
talent; but, the team then lost 
four games in a row without 
scoring. 

Coach John Haines said, 
"This team has the most 
talent I've seen, but the lack 
of consistency hurt us." 
However, several talented 
players received experience 
for the future when they saw 



varsity action. 

On their field, the freshmen 
had great hopes for a winning 
season. The coaches led hard 
practices and long hours to 
prepare the team, but it also 
lacked intensity. 

Broad Ripple's football 
program played quality teams 
which often hurt the 
freshmen. "In four out of 
eight of our games the 
opposing teams were just that 
much better than us," said 
Mr. Richard Orban, freshman 
coach. "I feel that when these 
men are juniors and seniors, 
they'll be very competitive." 





•"••N**^ .i*^,. 




FRESHMAN FOOTBALL — Back Row: 
Med Walker, Luther Mason, Robert 
Goodner, Mike Goff, Bobby Thomas, 
Kenneth Lumpkins, Leonard Nelson, 
Mike McPhail, Mike Harris. Third Row: 
Coach Richard Orban, Jeff Sherels, Eric 
Posey, Steve Hill, Mike Dooley, Mike 
Carter, Nathan Tuggles, Kenny Floyd, 
Kurt Johnson, Keith Davis, Assistant 
Coach Dominic Dorsey. Second Row: 
Aaron Smith, Tony Brown, Bennie 
Porter, Dana Toles, Mike Reid, Mark 
Wolfe, Chris Meguschar, Antrawn 
Wilburn, Chris Dennis. Front Row: Pat 
Jones, Charles Tyson. Richard Pittman, 
Tony Hillard, Kevin Johnson, Richie 
Orban. 

CAREFUL . . . Wincing with pain from a 
game injury, freshman player Kenneth 
Lumpkins receives aid from trainer Elliot 
Segal. 



Reserve, Freshman Football/31 



Standouts take honors 



While neither team did as 
well as expected, individuals 
excelled in spring track and 
field, and fall crosscountry. 

The injury-plagues boys' 
crosscountry team may have 
fallen short of expectations, 
but times and places 
improved greatly over 1980. 
Coach John Woody said that 
a great deal of young talent 
was evident, especially from 
two freshmen — Mark Lacy 
and Jermas McNeal — and 
three sophomores — Brian 
Bill, Jeff Jackson, and Ben 
Meadows. 

Jackson broke the old 
school record of 15:53 with a 
15:36.6. 

The boys' track team 
lacked numbers, but made up 
for it in individual talent, 
particularly in track events. 
Sectional champion in the 
100-and 200-meter dashes, 
Tony Cushenberry tied the 



school record of 0:10 in the 
100-meter dash and just 
missed going to State. 

The 440 relay team of 
Cushenberry, David Latimore, 
Kent Miller, Rickey Brown, 
and alternate Mike Garmany 
missed going to State by one 
place. 

The freshman team did 
well, particularly in the City. 
Kevin Madden broke the 
freshman high-hurdle record. 

Girls' track also lacked 
numbers but had individual 
talent. Two who excelled 
were Bridgit Steen and Kim 
Latimore. Steen ran the mile 
and the half mile while 
Latimore put the shot and ran 
sprints. 

Coaches in both boys' and 
girls' track and cross-country 
believed that the young talent 
on their teams would soon 
enable Broad Ripple to field 
stronger teams. 



■ 


Boys' Track - 




BR 




Op. 


42 


Cathedral 


81 


7th 


Attucks Invit. 




3rd 


Ritter/Scecina 




3rd 


Carmel/Ben Davis 




2nd 


Park Tudor/Cascade 




4 


Northwest 


60 


70 


Attucks 


68 


40 


Manual 
Warren Relays 


87 


6th 


Pike Invit. 




13th 


City 




9th 


City Frosh 




7th 


Sectional 





BR 


Girls' Track 


Op. 


59 


RItter 


44 


7th 


Attucks Relays 




22 


l^anual 


83 


3rd 


Washington /Tech 




50 


Brebeuf 


56 


50 


Attucks 


60 


3rd 


Howe/Cathedral 




8th 


Pike Relays 




9th 


City 




16th 


Sectional 






CROSS-COUNTRY — Back Row: 
Coach Phyllis Todd, Coach John 
Woody. Wendell Ray, Brian Bill. 
Richard Graveling, John Burkley, 
William Mays. Jermas McNeal. 



32/Track, Cross-Country 



Front Row; Amy Kassenbrock. Mark 
Lacy, Jeff Jackson, Mike Garmany. 
Ben Meadows. Mary Beth Blome. 
Jenny Shoup. 




GO FOR IT . . Running hard at the 
start of the race, Ben Meadows 
(right), William Mays, Jermas 
McNeal, and Jeff Jackson try to get 
good positioning for the long cross- 
country run. 



ANYTHING YOU CAN DO , . . 

thinks Mary Beth Blome (left). 
However. Jenny Shoup beat out 
Blome for a fourth-place finish. 
Blome placed well, however, in the 
cross-country meet. 




TRYING TO FLY? . No, it is 

William Mays long-jumping in the 
City Championships. Mays managed 
to place high in the tourney. 




BOYS' TRACK — Back Row; Coach 
John Newton, David Hudson, Kevin 
Madden, Coach John Harker. Third 
Row: David Roberts, Bill Lenore, Kent 
Miller, Curtis Maxi, Lester Brown. 
Second Row: Don Davis, Tony 
Cushenberry, David Latimore, Dennis 
Tate, Russell Lewis. Front Row: Jeff 
Jackson, Tom Knapp, Mike 
Garmany, John Ligen, Rickey Brown, 
Larry Roberts. 







I THINK I CAN. I THINK I CAN . 

and he did. Tony Cushenberry 
sprinted down the 100-meter dash 
lanes to win the well-run race. 



GIRLS' TRACK — Back Row: 
Courtney King, Patricia Graham, 
Zenophia Fitzgerald, Susan 
Richardson, Vicky Polk, Coach Joyce 
Seigers. Third Row: Lisa Shepard. 



■"■"" 


Cross-Country 




BR 




Op. 


3rd 


Ritter/Brebeuf 




29 


Manual 


.28 


47 


North Central 


.16 


41 


Sceclna 


.18 


45 


Washington 


.16 


44 


Cathedral 


17 


34 


Park-Tudor 


21 


30 


Heritage Christian . . 


.27 


10th 


City Meet 




3rd 


Attucks/Chatard/ 
Marshall 




46 


Pike 


.15 


23 


Arlington 


.26 


13th 


Sectional 




Second Row: Kim Lewis, Ferri 




Cooper, 


Tina Hill, Kandra Jones, 




Lynda Davis, Judi Clemmons. Front 


Row: Ta 


nya Pugh, Bridgit Steen, 




Lentina 


Moore, Marie Jessup 





^^ 



Track, Cross-Country/ 33 



Golf teams remain on the upswing 



Tension filled the air as the 
worn-out, sore golfer took his 
place over the tee. His legs 
knocked with the anticipation 
of the next shot. 

He had made it to the 18th 
hole without fainting, yet his 
stomach weakened and his 
head grew light with 
nervousness. 

This was it. Everything 
depended on this shot. If he 
made this shot, all his 
prayers would be answered: 
he would win! Slowly he 
arched his back, eyeing the 
ball with a steely glance. 

With the stance of a 
professional, he swung the 
club, hitting the ball into a 
clump of trees. 

Although every Broad 




FOOR . . Following through with 
her swing. Amy Essenberg competes 
in a golf match at Eagle Creek Golf 
Course. 



Ripple golfer didn't undergo 
such pains during a match, 
each one did experience an 
occasional feeling of 
nervousness as he 
approached the tee. 

Improving their record by 
two wins this year, the girls' 
golf team beat Lawrence 
Central and Pike in a tri- 
match. 

Promising players included 
Jenni Bigham, Susan 
Brummer, Peggy Calkins, and 
Courtney King. 

Coach Sandy Fenstermaker 



commented, "There are very 
good chances for next year 
because BR's team will 
consist mainly of experienced 
seniors." 

Due to the cancellations of 
a few matches at the end of 
the season, the boys' golf 
team finished without a win. 
Although its record looked 
somewhat disappointing, it 
managed to beat four teams 
in the City Tournament. 

Outstanding individuals on 
the team included Steve 
Badger and Mark Landers. 



WHAT? . . With a perplexing look 
on his face, Mark Landers stares at 
the path that the golf ball took. 




34/Golf 




BEHAVE! . . . Getting ready to tee 
off, senior Elizabeth Grimes gives the 
ball last-minute instructions. 



" 


— Boys' Golf 




BR 




Op. 


3rd 


Shortrldge/Park Tudor 




259 


Howe 


229 


3rd 


Lawrence C./Ben Davis 




257 


Scecina 


219 


259 


Lawrence North 


202 


2nd 


Shortridge/Attucks 




3rd 


Tech/Chatard 




235 


Ben Davis 


201 


3rd 


Arlington/Brebeuf 




185 


Manual 


148 


194 


Pike 


186 


3rd 


Northwest/Marshall 




10th City 




16th Sectional 





GIRLS' GOLF — Back Row: Tara 
Jackson, Courtney King, Jenny 
Moffatt, Jody Diekmann, Liz Grimes, 
Peggy Calkins. Front Row: Coach 
Sandy Fenstermaker, Amy 
Essenburg, Susan Brummer, Jenni 
Bigham, Alison Fenstermaker. 





— Girls' Golf 




BR 




Op. 


1st 


Pike/Lawrence North 




243 


Speedway 


242 


225 


Howe 


212 


229 


Brebeuf 


232 


264 


Park Tudor 


259 


233 


Decatur Central 


207 


243 


Carmel 


225 


256 


Perry Meridian 


234 


246 


Warren Central 


207 


13th 


Sectional 





"TALLEY-HO!" . . . orders Peggy 
Calkins, junior, after hitting the ball 
into a large patch of trees. 



GoIf/35 



BR learns from faults 



Losing six of its last seven 
matches, the boys' tennis 
team finished its season with 
a 4-9 record. The team did, 
however, beat the 1980 
team's record by one match. 

Mark Landers, number-one 
singles player, led individual 
play with eight wins and eight 
losses. Doubles team J. A. 
Lacy and Larry Monger held 
the doubles standing with a 7- 
7 record. Playing the longest 
doubles match in IHSAA 
history. Matt Graham and 
Nathan Price toiled for an 
incredible four-plus hours in 
the City Tournament. 

The girls' team finished the 
season with the City 



Tournament, placing ninth 
overall with members 
advancing to second-round 
play. 

Paula Hardy, senior, ranked 
in the number-one position on 
the team, followed by Cindy 
Bubenzer. Compiling a 7-4 
record in regular season play, 
Bubenzer won seven games in 
the tournament. 

With the majority of the 
girls returning to play for the 
1981-82 season, experience 
will be an asset to the team. 



CONCENTRATION . . . Mark 
Landers, number-one singles player, 
tenses up to return a shot during a 
crucial match. 




BOYS' TENNIS — Back Row: 
Nathan Price, J. A. Lacy, Mark 
Landers. Front Row: Matt Graham, 
Mac Goode. 





— Girls' Tennis - 




BR 




Op. 


3 


Attucks 


2 


3 


Marshall 


2 





Cathedral 


5 





Chatard 


5 





Park Tudor 


5 





North Central 


5 


5 


Arlington 








Pike 


5 


1 


Manual 


4 


1 


Scecina 


4 


3 


Shortridge 


2 


2 


Tech 


3 


1 


Ritter 


4 


9th 


City 





KEEP THE ARMS BENT . . Cindy 
Bubenzer. number-two singles player 
on the girls' team, swings through a 
practice shot. 




i 






36/Tennis 







—Boys Tennis - 




BR 




Op. 


4 


Northwest 


1 


4 


Attucks 


1 





Howe 


5 


1 


Scecina 


4 





Lawrence Central 


5 


5 


Arlington 








Chatard 


5 


1 


Tech 


4 


1 


Washington 


4 


3 


Marshall 


2 





Pike 


5 


1 


Roncalli 


4 


2 


Ritter 
City 


3 



TAKE THAT! . . . Mac Goode, 
number-two singles player, slams the 
first serve of a match against his 
opposition. 



-^k-Ti. jr»\ 





GIRLS' TENNIS — Sandra Pugh, 
Cindy Bubenzer, Stephanie Powers, 
Jennie Love, Joenne Pope, Monica 
Bryant, Cathy Ellis, Yvette Perry, 
Paula Hardy. 



Tennis/37 



Errors Plague Season 



Smack! Dust flew from the 
catcher's mitt. "Stee-rike 
three!" roared the umpire. 
The outfielder responded with 
hoots and the pitcher smiled 
approvingly. Another inning 
had ended. 

Varsity baseball had 
difficulty putting it all 
together for a win but had 
several talented players. 

Senior Marc McQueen led 
the team in hits, RBI's, and 
stolen bases. His talent 
earned him a scholarship to 
Kentucky State University. 
Cedric Lindsay, junior, led the 
Rockets in batting with a .371 
average. Marc McQueen was 
close behind with a .327 
effort. 

The Rockets, committing 
few errors and having high 
fielding percentages, were 
very strong in the field. 
However, they failed to put 
points on the board. 

Hurt by inexperience at key 
positions and ineffective 



pitching. Broad Ripple's junior 
varsity baseball team came 
out on top in only one game. 

A major contributor to this 
inexperience was the absence 
of a practice field. The team 
had only a few practices on a 
real baseball diamond and 
was once forced to practice 
following a game on the 
opponent's field. 

"We just need more men to 
try out for the team," said 
Elliot Segal, JV coach. "Then 
we can think of producing a 
winning club." 



WHO'S ON FIRST ... No, he's up 
to bat as the varsity Rockets look on 
from the dugout while their team- 
mate faces the opposing pitcher. 



BATMAN . . . Junior varsity catcher 
Brian Bowman takes a good cut at a 
strike in the Howe game. The 
Rockets lost the contest, 51. 




ii '^['ij.ii i 



VARSITY BASEBALL — Back Row: 
Coach John Tremain, Anthony 
Bigsbee, Cedric Lindsay, Gregg 
Sheriff, Maurice Womack, Michael 
Murf, Charles Davis, Butch Petty, 
Coach Elliot Segal. Front Row: 
Derrick Dixon, Chris Murphy, Marc 
McQueen, Jerry Burris, Gary Pope, 
Michael Gunnell. 



JV Baseball 



BR 




Op. 


7 


Ritter 


10 


6 


Carmel 


14 


17 


Park Tudor 


15 


1 


North Central 


15 


1 


Manual 


11 


1 


Howe 


9 





Tech 


7 


6 


Cathedral 


16 


1 


Chatard 


12 



^ 




«^ 




38/Baseball 




A ROCKET FASTBALL . 

Freshman pitcher Mike Sherman 
reaches back for that something 
extra. 



NOTHIN' TO IT ... Junior varsity 
third baseman Mark Randall attempts 
to steal second and slides in with 
room to spare. 



/ / 





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Varsity Baseball 


— 


BR 






Op. 


12 


Ritter 




6 


2 


Marshall 




7 


11 


Attucks 




3 





Lawrence North 




10 





Lawrence North 




7 


2 


Scecina 




3 


1 


Howe 




5 


2 


North Central 




7 





Warren Central 




2 





Warren Central 




10 


2 


Manual 




8 


7 


Mooresville 




18 


8 


Shortridge 




5 


1 


Tech 







9 


Roncalli 




12 





Cathedral 




I 


3 


Chatard 




2 


2 


Tech (City Tourney) 


6 


3 


Scecina (Sectiona 


1) 


5 



TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT 

Sophomore Rodney Jones patiently 
awaits the throw of a Rocket 
infielder. 



1. 



Baseball/39 




BONZAI! Determined not to 

allow the opposition to score, 
Ripple's defense takes control of 
a critical game situation. 



40/ Soccer 




yj(S'w%fr«'Wiv»' 



CHARGE . . . Despite the desperate 
attack of an opponent, Mark Dorsey, 
senior, makes a determined charge 
toward the ball. 




READY. AIM . . . Preparing to fire 
away at the opposing goal, Brett 
Sommers, team captain, forwards for 
the Rockets. 

1. 2, 3, KICK ... An opponent 
shows Tim Johnson, senior forward 
for Ripple, the chorus-line technique 
of soccer. 







^J 







,sis Soccer's first shot falls short 




For the first time ever, 
Ripple had an official soccer 
team. Although the team, 
comprised of 17 boys and 
girls, compiled a 
disappointing 1-8-1 record, 
many players felt that the 
team was better than its 
records indicated. Goalie Stan 
Miller commented, "We lost a 
couple of one-point games 
that we should have won." 
Miller, who tended the nets 
every game of the season, 

HOMAN PRETZEL . . . Unexpectedly 
colliding with a defender, Doug 
Jones, junior, reacts with surprise. 



also stated, "As the team 
matures, we will have great 
success in future seasons." 

This was the first season in 
which Ripple participated in 
the Central Indiana Soccer 
League, which involved teams 
throughout the mid-state area. 
Brett Sommers, team captain, 
added, "The schedule was 
very tough. Every game 
required a 110 percent effort, 
and I was very pleased with 
the team's determination." 



An added attraction for 
sports fans was the fact that 
three girls competed on the 
squad. The girls — Cindy 
Bubenzer, Susan Showalter, 
and Amy Weichert — saw 
action in most of the 10 
games. Showalter 
commented, "It's been a very 
enjoyable experience — and 
very challenging." Plans for 
the future included league 
competition in both fall and 
spring seasons. 



Soccer/41 



Varsity 5 rebounds to even season 



"And here they are, your 
1981-82 BROAD RIPPLE 
ROCKETS!" boomed the 
announcer as a young 
basketball team hit the 
boards and prepared for their 
first game of the season. The 
team boasted six seniors; 
however, only two members, 
juniors Clinton Davis and 
Troy Fitts, had varsity 
experience. 

As fate would have it, the 
Rockets went on to lose to 
Brebeuf, 88-80. The Rockets 
continued on to beat 
Lawrence Central 78-77, and 
Chatard, 65-59, before losing 
to state-ranked Connersville in 
a close 69-65 finish. The 




BAIT-O-MAX . . . Striving for a 
basket, Butch Perry is blocked by a 
Howe player. 

CRASHING THE BOARDS 

Going up for a rebound. Ripple's 
Derrick Toran leaps for extra points 
in second-round City play against 
Howe. 



Rocket's early record of two 
wins and two losses seemed 
to set the pace for what was 
to come, as the Rockets 
remained about .500 all 
season. 

The Rockets luck also 
seemed about .500 this year. 
In the city tourney they drew 
an easy first-round against 
Attucks, but from then on 
faced a tough bracket, 
including no.-l Howe, no. -2 
Cathedral and no. -7 
Washington. The Rockets 
entered the second round 
against Howe, but fell short 
of their goal, losing 60-58. 

When asked about 
sometimes poor Rocket play, 



Coach William Smith 
answered, "Mental errors! We 
made too many of them. You 
can't win a game with 25 
fouls. Our shot selection has 
been poor this year also." 

In looking to next year, the 
varsity will have six returning 
members. "This is the most 
talented team I've ever played 
on. If we learn from our 
errors this year, we will have 
the capability of going really 
far next season," commented 
Dennis Bland. 



CROWD PLEASER During a 

ninth-hour pep session, students rev- 
up for the first sectional game 
against Lawrence North. 




42/Varsity Basketball 







Varsity Basketball 



BR Op. 

82 Brebeuf 88 
77 Lawrence Central 68 
65 Chatard 57 
65 Connersville 69 

85 Northwest 79 

67 Richmond 76 

83 Manual 55 
74 Howe 85 
103 Anderson Highland 108 

68 Arlington 66 

60 John Marshall 59 
52 Attucks (City 49 
55 Howe (City) 58 
74 Washington 86 
77 Attucks (Forfeit) 49 

86 Tech 89 
82 Hammond Noll 84 
51 Cathedral 77 

61 New Washington 51 
68 Gary Roosevelt 74 
72 Lawrence North (Sectional) 66 
55 Cathedral (Sectional) 62 



DOUBLE TIME . . Trying to beat the 
ball, Michael Murff races down the 
court during a home game. 











i^ 




NO PASSING ZONE . . Blocking an 
opposing player, Clinton Davis controls 
the lane. 

VARSITY BASKETBALL — Back 
Row: Coach William Smith, Donnie 
Harris, Dennis Jones, Troy Fitts, Der- 
rick Toran, Greg Sheriff, Clinton Davis, 
Quinton Sharp. Front Row: George 
Black, Doug Jones, Michael Murff, 
Butch Petty, Charles Davis, Dennis 
Bland. 



I. 



Varsity Basketball/43 



Players shoot for top 



With players returning from 
a 1980-81 15-3 freshman 
team, the junior varsity 
basketball team started out 
with another strong season. 
However, the frosh began 
slowly, then got things rolling. 

The JV team lost two close 
games to Northwest and 
Howe, but still defeated good 
teams, including Chatard and 
Brebeuf. 

Coach Roderic Trabue 
credited the success to quick 
play, good defense, and fine 
team play. He also said that 
some of the better players 
included Donny Harris, Doug 
Jones, Rodney Jones, and 
Fred Lumpkins. 

In the city tournament the 



team first beat Attucks, then 
Howe. However, in the 
semifinals, Cathedral 
overpowered the Rockets. 

After the tourney, players 
began to prepare for their 
possible moves up to varsity. 

The freshmen, after a 
decisive 15-point victory over 
Marshall in the first round of 
the city tourney, ended their 
season with a 36-32 loss to 
Arlington. 

Bob Thomas, who hit 60 
percent of his shots for an 
average of 11.6 points, was 
the season's leading scorer. 
Close behind, William Helm 
scored an average 10 points a 
contest to help the frosh to a 
6-7 record. 





JV BASKETBALL — Back Row: 
Coach Roderic Trabue, Patrick 
Murray, William Woodson, Rodney 
Jones, William Kidd, Kalvin Carter, 
Sherwin Robinson. Front Row: Mosi 
Wallace, Ellis Rose, Obbie Williams, 
Charles Cobb, Dave Roberts, Fred 
Lumpkins. 

SHOOTING FOR TWO Going up 

for the jump shot. Junior Doug 
Jones puts in two. 



44/ JV, Frosh Basketball 





OOCH! . . . Grimacing in pain after 
crashing to the floor, a Ripple player 
receives the attention of the trainers. 



aP. UP AND AWAY . . . Jumping 
high off the floor, a Ripple player 
tries to get the ball from a Gary 
Roosevelt player. 




->- 




LIGHTER THAN AIR ... Floating 
between two Attucks defenders, frosh 
player Ronald Lee goes up for an 
easy lay-up. 





JV Basketball 




BR 




Op. 


65 


Brebeuf 


50 


62 


Lawrence Central 


33 


49 


Chatard 


47 


44 


Connversville 


43 


47 


Northwest 


48 


68 


Richmond 


64 


61 


Manual 


36 


64 


Howe 


60 


59 


Anderson Highland 


72 


42 


Arlington 


48 


64 


John Marshall 


73 


49 


Attucks (City) 


42 


60 


Howe (City) 


58 


51 


Cathedral (City) 


77 


41 


Washington 


43 


42 


Attucks 


34 


41 


Tech 


30 


44 


Hammond Noll 


54 


36 


Cathedral 


46 


42 


New Washington 


41 


44 


Gary Roosevelt 


68 



FROSH BASKETBALL — Back 
Row: Robert Thomas, Jon Ireland, 
Jay Vahle, William Helm, Kenny 
Floyd. Second Row: Tommy 
Slaughter, Lonnie Webster, Eric 
Posey, Ronald Lee, James 
Northington, Coach Tom Reinsche. 
Front Row: John Darrish, David 
Hatcher, Dona Toles, Jeffrey Sherels, 
Antrawn Wilburn. 



— Frosh Basketball -^ 


BR 


Tech 


Opp 


49 


Washington 


53 


47 


Chatard 


49 


36 


Scecina 


63 


43 


Northwest 


33 


42 


Arlington 


57 


52 


Cathedral 


51 


36 


Manual 


46 


49 


Howe 


45 


54 


RItter 


66 


49 


Marshall (City) 


39 


54 


Arlington (City) 


39 


32 




36 



JV, Frosh Basketball/45 



Girls hope to improve 



Lack of experience was the 
principal problem facing the 
varsity girls' basketball team, 
according to Coach Elliott 
Segal. 

However, he added, 
"They're very coachable; they 
know what to work on to 
become good ballplayers." 

With a season record of 
only 4-13, the young varsity 
team, believed Segal, would 
have a good 1982-83 season. 
"They keep banging their 
heads against walls. They're 
not quitters." 

Segal expected to have 
nine returning players after 
losing only Regina Sanders 
and Sherry Sessions to 
graduation. 



Segal said that the team 
played well defensively. Kim 
Latimore and Karen Coleman 
were tops on rebounds, with 
Latimore claiming 114 
rebounds, Coleman 56. 

Volleyball started slowly 
this year, but closed with two 
wins. Coach Shirley Lambert 
saw Regina Sanders and 
Annette Fauteck as two 
strengths on the squad. 
"Regina is a good player. She 
not only plays well, but 
consistently." She said 
Fauteck was the setter for 
Sanders' spiking. 

PALM SPRINGS? . Returns were 
an integral part of practice. Here 
Renee Arnold returns a shot. 




•Girls' JV Basketballv 



BR 




Op. 


22 


Attucks 


26 


41 


Chatard 


25 


20 


Cathedral 


33 


23 


Zionsville 


31 


41 


Arlington (City) 


29 


32 


Northwest (City) 


30 


27 


Attucks (City) 


30 


32 


Howe 


33 


29 


Marshall 


24 


32 


Tech 


23 


25 


Manual 


36 


35 


Washington 


27 


41 


Arlington 


40 



VARSITY BASKETBALL — Back 

Row: Assistant Coach Janice 
Verplank, Karen Coleman, Kim 
Latimore. Gena Stubbs, Tina Collins, 
Assistant Coach Phyllis Todd. Front 
Row: Roxanne Bartlett, Mary Taylor, 
Coach Elliott Segal, Regina Sanders, 
Angle Hamilton. 



Varsity Volleyball 



BR 




Op. 





Zionsville 


2 





Crispus Attucks 


2 





Cathedral 


2 





Chatard 


2 





Tech 


2 





Pike 


2 





Arlington 


2 





Northwest 


2 





Manual 


2 


2 


School for the Deaf 





2 


Washington 






HIGHBALL After spiking the ball 

during a game against Cathedral, a 
Ripple player intently watches her 
shot. 




46/Girls' Sports 



/Girls' Varsity BasketbalK 



BR 




Op. 


29 


Crispus Attucks 


83 


30 


Chatard 


39 


13 


Lutheran 


53 


47 


Cathedral 


50 


33 


Zionsville 


38 


49 


Arlington 


21 


58 


Northwest 


82 


40 


Crispus Attucks 


76 


67 


Huntington 


40 


62 


Howe 


51 


62 


Marshall 


64 


61 


Washington 


53 


40 


Arsenal Tech 


71 


42 


Manual 


59 


49 


Arlington 


82 


51 


Brebeuf 


72 



JV BASKETBALL — Back Row: 
Coach Janice Verplank, Kim 
Young, Coach Phyllis Todd. Front 
Row: Kim Johnson, Matalie 
Turner, Donna Martin, Lisa 
Tuggles, DeAnn Jarver. 




ANTICIPATION . . . Concentrating 
on the ball, Renee Arnold sets herself 
before returning a shot while Annette 
Fauteck looks on. 



Girls' Sports/47 



Wrestlers 'pin' hopes on future 





» Wrestling _ 




BR 




Op. 


6 


Marshall 


66 


6 


Washington 


64 


6 


Scecina 


63 


11 


Rltter 


53 


9 


Howe 


55 


39 


Park Tudor 


35 


21 


School for Deaf 


48 


13th 


City 




3 


Lawrence North 


64 


15 


Northwest 


54 


6 


Scecina 


60 


36 


Attucks 


27 


6 


Arlington 


60 


37 


Brebeuf 


18 


6 


Eastern Hancock 


63 


4th 


Sectional 





"Take the shot!" 
If you ever attended a 
Broad Ripple wrestling match, 
these were words you were 
likely to hear Coach Richard 
Orban yelling. 

The wrestling team 
improved greatly over the 
1980-81 team as it won more 
dual meets and finished 
higher in the City. Even with 
these improvements, the 
team suffered setbacks. It lost 
sophomore Eon Davis to a 
shoulder injury early in the 
season and lacked the 
numbers to fill all weight 
classes, thus hurting the team 
in dual meet scoring. 



The team was composed 
mainly of freshmen and 
sophomores. It could boast of 
only three experienced 
upperclassmen — Michael 
Garmany and William Mays, 
seniors, and Terrance 
Crumpton, junior. According 
to Assistant Coach John 
Tremain, Garmany and Mays 
were the team leaders. Each 
wrestler, he said, gave 100 
percent and was completely 
dedicated to improving 
himself and the team. 

All wrestlers were drilled on 
the basics and learned 
discipline in competition 
among themselves. The team. 



according to Tremain, had set 
its sights on being more 
competitive during the 
season. It met this goal on an 
individual basis. 

An added attraction was 
absent this year. The mat- 
maids, who had been together 
for two seasons, were 
discontinued. Some felt the 
enthusiasm they added to the 
meets was missed. 



TYLENOL-TIME . . . Holding his 
Scecina opponent in a headlock, 
William Mays gains valuable points 
during his match. 







48/Wrestling 




ALL TIED UP . . . Grabbing his 
opponent's arm and leg, a Ripple 
wrestler takes command and goes for 
the pin while the ref watches. 



NECK-TIE . . . Holding his opponent 
in a head lock, a Ripple wrestler 
gains a distinct advantage while the 
referee looks on. 




■■'•^ — 


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WRESTLING — Back Row: Assistant 
Coach John Tremain, Keith Davis, 
Trevor Murray, Leslie Grady, Nathan 
Tuggles, John Lowry, William Mays, 
Robert Goodner, Leon Lewis. Coach 
Richard Orban. Front Row: Patrick 
Jones, Jerry Jones, Mark Lacy, 
Elmer Quarles, Jessie Stampler, 
Michael Garmany, William Lenoir, 
Terrance Crumpton. 



SAY 'UNCLE' . . Struggling to keep 
a grip on his opponent, Nathan 
Tuggles grabs his ankle in an 
attempted takedown. 

BEAR HUG . . . Overpowering his 
adversary with a hold around the 
abdomen, Jesse Stampler prepares to 
throw his opponent to the mat. 



Wrestling/49 



VARSITY CHEERLEADERS — Top 

to Bottom: Denise Wynn, Amy 
Weichert, Lana Rose, Julie Adams, 
Kelly Evans, Ann Cox. 

WE'RE NGMBER-ONE! During a 

time out of the Gary Roosevelt game, 
the JV cheerleaders fire up the 
crowd to cheer the Rockets to a 
victory. 









Cheers spark Rockets 



"We are BR! ... We are 
BR!" The cheer echoed 
throughout the gym as the 
basketball players raced down 
the court in an effort to tie 
up the game. 

Where did all the 
encouragement come from? 
On the sidelines the 
cheerleaders of the school 
stomped, clapped, and 
shouted their support for the 
team and helped to lead the 
crowd in spirit, also. 

The cheerleaders did 
precisely what their name 
implies. Even if Ripple was 
behind in a game, they 
provided suppKsrt and 
encouragement. BR broke the 
regular stereotype of a 
bouncy, peppy cheerleader. 
Long, tough practices 
occupied the girls' time after 
school in the form of new 
routines, mounts, and 
acrobatics. 

While cheering and 
practicing they also had to 
keep their grade point up to 



the necessary average. 

During the summer it was 
mandatory for the varsity 
cheerleaders to attend camp. 
At a Universal Cheerleaders 
Association (O.C.A.) camp 
they learned new cheers, and 
mounts. 

The varsity squad cheered 
for both the varsity football 
and basketball teams while 
the JV cheered for its teams. 
Occasionally both squads 
cheered at games and pep 
sessions. 

The freshman cheerleading 
tryouts were held during the 
fall and the four chosen girls 
then prepared for the 
upcoming games. Susannah 
Grimes said "It was really 
hard at first, but we got it 
together near the end of the 
season. It was a good 
experience for me." 

As spirit leaders of the 
school, cheerleaders provided 
support and sideline 
entertainment throughout the 
sfwrts season. 




LETTERMEN'S CLUB — Back Row: 
William Mays, Liz Grimes, Wendell 
Ray, Hans Meyers, Ed Carter, Paul 
Cheshire, Tim Pappas, Terrance 
Crumpton. Second Row: Mary Beth 
Blome, Michael Garmany, Michelle 



Brooks, Cindy Bubenzer, Larry 
Monger, Steve Badger, Regina 
Sanders. Front Row: Chris Noel, 
Jackson, Jenny Love, Susan 
Brummer, Susie Talbott, Jenni 
Bigham. 



Jeff 



50/Cheerleaders 




FIRE GP . . . Performing one of their 
many routines, the varsity 
cheerleaders urge the team on to 
victory. 

ANTICIPATION . . Watching a 
tense moment in the game are 
basemen Kent Miller and Eric 
Williams. 






FRESHMAN CHEERLEADERS — 

Back Row: Susannah Grimes. Bottom 
Row: Jerni McCawley. Jennifer 
Jordan, Paula Gill. 

RESERVE CHEERLEADERS — 

Back Row: Lisa McEahearn, Elaine 
Chenault. Front Row: Caria Jones, 
Dawn Wells, Tina Moore. 



Cheerleaders/ 51 



BR performs with style 



As the majorettes finished 
their two and a half hour long 
practice for the homecoming 
half time performance, their 
arms and fingers ached from 
numerous flat spins and 
finger twirls. Their work, 
however, paid off and they 
performed despite the cold at 
the parade and at half time 
during the game. "1 feel that 
it is a lot of work, but when 
you are out there it is all 
worth it," commented 
majorette captain Susan 



GETTING IT TOGETHER Pom 

Pon girls learn a new routine for the 
opening basketball game against 
Brebeuf. 



Glunt. 

Majorettes and PomPons 
had a car wash together 
during the summer. 
Majorettes also held a bake 
sale and a candy sale to 
purchase new basketball 
uniforms. PomPon girls raised 
money for summer camp by 
selling Rubik's cubes and 
having a candy sale. Both 
Pom-Pons and Majorettes 
performed during the year at 
football games as well as 
numerous parades. 



FIVE ... SIX SEVEN . . 

EIGHT . . . Practicing for an 
upcoming performance, the 
majorettes perfect their routines. 




L-ii 





WHAT'S NEXT? Learning a 

routine Yolanda Boyd practices for 
the Homecoming Parade. 

CHORUS LINE .At the Broad 
Ripple vs. Northwest game, the Pom- 
Pon girls perform their halftime 
routine. 



k;J 






**• 



^^' 



52/Pom-Pon 



^k^ 



STEP . . KICK Pom Pon girls 

practice their routine for the 
Veteran's Day Parade. 



MAJORETTES . Susan Glunt, 
Patricia (Jrsino, Anne Daniells, 
Yolanda Boyd, Linda Gogulis. 



I 





KICKING IN STYLE . . . Pom pon 

girls proudly perform at the first 
home game of the season. 

POM-PON Back Row: Lisa Cheathan, 
Rochelle Boyd. Shelly Chappell, 
Indria Woods, Sandra Taylor, Mrs. 
Pernella Burns. Front Row: Lashakk 
Deloney, Mary Nowlin, Sandra 
McCraclin, Caria Willams, Janet 
Sherrel, Crystal Miller, Manice 
Sherrell, Yolanda Jordan, Judi 
Clemmons, Terry Harell. Patricia 
Graham. 



PERFORMING TO THE BEAT 

Pom Pon girls CarIa Willams, 
Rochelle Boyd, Mary Nowlin perform 
to the beat of the music. 



Majorettes/53 



HIGH RISE . . Adding finishing 
touches to the frame work for the 
set of the crucible. Mary James and 
Lori Rosebrock work during 
rehearsal. 

PINBALL WIZARD Although 

video games have swept through the 
nation's market and Into homes, 
Sandy Miller still enjoys a game of 
pinball 



'CORPS' ORATION As part of 

the Veterans' Day activities, ROTC 
marched in the downtown parade. 



^U^i^'^ 






. (— - 






■hH 



JAM SESSION During their 

regular class period. Band Director 
Mr. Rudy Finnell and band members 
work out some new pieces. 









CANDLE LIGHT . . As the final 
step of Thespian induction, new 
members repeat the oath. 





54/ Activities 





I 



■V 



r 



s/Xf 



ACTIVITIES 




Time ticks by quickly 



What to do? 

At BR the problem was one 
of time — there wasn't 
enough of it to go around. 

The 3:15 bell rings and it's 
a quick race to a NHS 
meeting. At 3:45, Sam 
Student jogs over to an 
ROTC drill only to hurry to a 



French Club meeting at 4 
o'clock. After a 30-second 
sprint to 225, he arrives just 
in time to finish up a story 
for newspaper. First 4:30, 
then 5:15 ticks by while Sam 
rehearses for his "Ripples" 
act. Worn and tired, a sleepy 
Sam drags himself to the bus 
stop at 6:30; he heads home 
to start his homework. 

Life began and ended at 
school. Home became just a 
place to study and hopefully 
catch up on sleep . . . 
hopefully. With 55 activities 
to chose from, even the most 
ambitious student dared not 
take on everything. Five or 
six organizations proved 
enough — sometimes too 
much. 



CRAMMIN' . . . Before the 8:25 bell 
rings, Shannon Harvey glances over 
her test notes one last tinne. 





BOG-OUT Putting the final 

touches on the Key Club float, Mary 
Lahnnan, Todd Snyder, and Tara 
Jackson prepare to move out. 



Activities/55 



Creativity makes * ripples' 



Nervous tension realmed as 
the student performers 
converted their anxiety into 
onstage energy. Despite lost 
costumes, missed cues and 
amateurish song renditions, 
students' enthusiasm 
prevailed at the 1981 Spring 
Ripples. 

Sponsored by Mr. Michael 
Hendrin and Mrs. Doris 
Young, Ripples consisted of 
three student-written, directed, 
and acted 20-minute comedic 
and musical acts, as well as 
intermission acts. A 36year 
tradition, "Ripples is special 
at Broad Ripple because it 
allows pupils to be creative 
without having to conform," 
said Young. 

Last year's acts ranged 
from "Daddy's Angels", 
written and directed by 
Yvette Perry, Tracy Swatts, 
and Denise Wynn. They 
starred as Daddy's Angels, 
trying to save their TV spot 
while in network heaven to a 
tomboy conquering medieval 
male chauvinism in Doug 
Miller and Scott Stevens' 
"Once Gpon a Knight". "How 
Sweet It is", the collaborated 
effort of Lisa Coreman, 
Marsha Maroney, and 
Courtney Spudic, featured a 
slim and trim sheriff in a 
community of fat mobsters. 

Mystery, personalities, 
humor and honesty diversified 
the four 1981 One Acts. 
These autumn performances. 




FEELINGS Following the 

progression of people's feelings, 
"Stages" introduced a new kind of 
theatre in which the cast shared their 
sfxjntaneous emotions with the 
audience. 



sponsored by drama teacher 
Mrs. Dolly Davis, "created a 
personal feeling of unity 
between the actors and their 
audience, since the audience 
is seated on stage only a few 
feet away from the actors," 
said Davis. 

These individual shows 
tended to complement each 
other. The eeriness of the 
supernatural in "Them 
Haunting of Hathaway 
House", directed by Lisa 
Lockwood and Jenny Price, 
successfully contrasted the 
reality of clashing 
personalities in "Impromptu", 
directed by Tim Payne and 
Patrick Wisdom. 

Mark Dorsey and Scott 
Stevens directed "Feifer's 
People", which included 
humorous slapstick and 
commentaries on life in 
general, provided a comical 
change from the more 
serious, honest feelings of 
pupils in "Stages", an 
experimental show without a 
script and conceived and 
coordinated by Andrew 
Austin. 



CRAMMIN' CALORIES Senior 

Clars Danvold (Texercise) grimaces 
as Blubba (Hunt Waycott) forces him 
to eat calorie-ladden cake in order to 
become fat like the rest of the gang. 

ROYAL DUET . . . Stacey DeBruler 
and David Hanson express their 
intense dislike for each other in the 
comedy '"Once Upon A Knight." 




56/Ripples, One Acts 



COOL DUDE Speaking out on 

his generations's behalf, junior Ivan 
Johnson resembles a teenager from 
the hippie's age of mellowness in 
"Feiffers People". 




ALL THAT JAZZ . . . Rehearsing 
their closing song for the 1981 
Ripples Acts, the cast of "Daddy's 
Angels" practices late into the night 
to perfect their act. 



Ripples, One Acts/57 



Off Broad Ripple Company makes T.V. debut 



Lights! Camera! Action! 
Discovering fame in front of 
the camera. The Off Broad 
Ripple Company had its 
television debut this year for 
Channel Four's "Janie 
Show." Taf>ed in November 
for the Christmas show, 
OBRC presented several 
original sketches which aired 



HUBBA BGBBA . Working hard 
on pantomiming bubble blowing, 
sophomore drama student, Tom 
Peeler also gets graded for his 
unusual and funny facial expressions. 



in late December. Other 
[performances for OBRC 
included its traditional 
op>ening Halloween show at 
Meridian Street Methodist. 

The Company finished its 
1 980^1 year with the 
successful "An Evening with 
the Off Broad Ripple 
Company". The show 



42nd STREET? . . . Broad Ripple 
creates its own Broadway marquee 
when The Off Broad Ripple Company 
is displayed on the B.R. sign board to 
catch the public's eye for ufxroming 
shows. 



consisted of some of the 
troupe's material and a new 
original opening mimicking 
the Mickey Mouse Club. 

Six new members joined 
the Company this year and 
proved to fit into the OBRC 
easily. "In the beginning I felt 
embarrassed to make 
suggestions; but when we 
started into the shows, I felt 
more like a member," said 
junior member J. A. Lacy. 

"To be or not to be" was 
the question that faced 40 
drama students during a field 



trip to see the Indiana 
Repertory Theatre's 
production of Shakespeare's 
Hamlet. The field trip was 
just one of the many 
activities for drama students. 

During the first semester 
pantomime was a major point 
of study, after which students 
progressed to performing 
dramatic scenes in front of 
live audiences. 

Whether enrolled in OBRC 
or a drama class, students 
gained experience in many 
areas of drama. 




OBRC — Back Row: David 
Engleking, Mike Law, Mark Dorsey. 
Third Row: Andrew Austin, J. A. 
Lacy, Mick Law, Ann Cox, Kirk 
Brittaln. Second Row: Heather 
Matthews, Tara Jackson, Tom 
Knapp. Sue App>el. Front Row: 
Shannon Harvey, Paula Hardy. 



MONKEY BUSINESS During 

"An Evening with the Off Broad 
Ripple Company." Andrew Austin 
and Mark Dorsey perform one of the 
Company's skits about a monkey 
and an organ grinder. 



^ 



58/Drama 




SCARY "BaSINESS" Practicing 

and having fun, OBRC members Ann 
Cox, Heather Matthews, and David 
Engleking work on a sketch about 
scarecrows for their pening 
Halloween show. 

NEWTON'S THEORY OF GRAVITY?. 

In a pantomime, drama student 

Kim Paugh demonstrates to the class 

the correct way of apple picking. 




MASQUE AMD MIME — Back Row: 
Mark Dorsey, Tim Johnson, J. A. 
Lacy, Phillip Sharpley, Scott Stevens, 
Tom Peeler, Clars Danvold, Richard 
Hazel, Mary Lahman, Peggy Calkins, 
Ann Cox, Liz Grimes, Mimi Gatens, 
Andrew Austin. Third Row: Susan 
App>el, Beth Hill, Jenny Love, Heather 
Matthews, Kelly Vale, Dawn 
Cooreman, Sally Roettger, Heidi 
Fledderjohn, Marilyn Smith, Michelle 
Brooks, Michelle Essenberg, Joenne 
Pope, Jenny Moffatt. Second Row: 
Kelli Little, Stan Smith, Tom Knapp, 
Jenny Foley, Kirk Birttain, Mary 
Henn, Anne Daniels, Maya Roth, 
Sabrine Lutz, Tiffany Lach, Dianne 
Link, Mary B. Blome. Front Row: 
Shannon Harvey, Ivan Johnson, 
Sarah Harvey, Darryl Knapp, Betsi 
Wiley, Terri Hoseclaw, Laurel 
Klapfjer, Jenny Shoup, Beth 
Buddenbaum, Amy Kassenbrock, 
Carolynn Mahoney, Rachel Rigel. 



OBRC/59 



CLASS CLOWN Fellow 

"Staircase" classmates listen intently 
as Rusty (Clars Danvold) tells of his 
preposterous weekend. 

EXTRA! EXTRA! . . . Strolling across 
the stage, Susan Appel tries to sell 
the school newspaper, The Clarion. 




THESPIANS — Back Row: Stan 
Smith, Tim Johnson, Mark Dorsey, 
Nick Law, J. A. Lacy, Patrick 
Widsom, Scott Stevens, J.C. Walker, 
Doug Miller, Mike Law, Andrew 
Austin, Gary Steele, Kirk Brittain, 
Hunt Waycott. Second Row: Mrs. 
Dolly Davis, Mimi Gatens, Jenny 
Moffatt. Sue Appel, Ann Cox, Liz 
Grimes, Peggy Calkins, Dawn 
Cooreman, Mary Beth Blome, Beth 
Hill. Maya Roth. Front Row: Mary 
Lahman, Jenny Love, Kelli Little, 
Rachel Reigal, Tara Jackson. Angela 
Stotler, Sandy Miller, Denise Adams, 
Anne Daniel, Jacque Hammonds. 



60/Thespian Play 




Thumbs-up for Staircase 



"Good morning class. I'm 
your new teacher, Miss 
Barrett"; words that started a 
war, a war between the 
characters of the Thespian 
production of Up The Down 
Staircase. The play protrayed 
the life of a young teacher 
named Slyvia Barrett (Liz 
White), who found herself 
thrown into the middle of a 
chaotic New York City high 
school. 
Crew members spent long 



YAH, SURE! . . . Sylvia lectures Joe 
about school while he wonders how 
he even got there. 



hours of hard work 
constructing the special set. 
The set gave the stage an 
abstract perspective for both 
the actors and the audience. 

The play boasted one of 
the largest casts in Thespian 
history, "which was often a 
hindrance more than a 
virtue," stated Dolly Davis, 
director of the production. 
"But over all I would call it a 
success," she added. The 
state drama conference 
selected it to be one of five 
plays presented during its 
annual meeting. There was no 
doubt that the students went 
up the right staircase. 





CLASSROOM CALAMITY . . . 

Students in Miss Barrett's English 
class disregard the bell and continue 
to gossip during their class. 

SIMPLY STATED . . . Shaking her 
hands in disgust, Liz White explains 
to her English class the difference 
between a clause and a phrase. 



HELP ME! . . . Insecure and 
perplexed, Alice (Tara Jackson) asks 
for advice about boys. 



Thespian Play/61 



'Camelot' enchants with magic 



Shiny pieces or taf>e 
glowed on the floor as a 
guide for the props crew. A 
tiny white kitten scampered 
about and whisked between 
the feet of a nervous 
Guenevere. Dressed in an 
inconspicious black cloak, 
she stepp>ed in and out of 
reality — nervously 
anticipating the moment the 
curtain would rise again . . . 
then the next moment, 
anticipating, as Guenevere 
would have, the last meeting 
with her husband, King 
Arthur. 

As the last scene during 
the final run of the BR 
musical, Camleot. crept 
closer and closer, so did the 



THE WIZ . . Foretelling the 
ufKroming marriage of Arthur and 
Guenevere, Merlin breaks the news to 
Arthur's men. 



long-awaited cast party and, 
afterwards, memories of a 
top-rate production. 

Rehearsals for the classical 
and well-known musical had 
begun in October. The usual 
rigors of lines and blocking 
progressed throughout the 
month and were accompanied 
with some different problems. 
Where to find medieval 
clothing, props, and how to 
get high school boys to wear 
tights? 

The story had not changed. 
Once upon a time, young 
Arthur, played by Rick 
Hasler, fell in love with and 
married Guenevere (Courtney 
Spudic). Problems interceded, 
however, in the form of 



FIT FOR A KING . . In the woods 
of Camelot, King Arthur talks with 
Guenevere before their marriage. 



Lancelot (Tim Johnson), and 
Arthur's illegitimate, wicked 
son, Mordred (Michael 
Johnson). Further 
complicating factors, Morgan 
LaFey, (Lisa Cooreman) up to 
her usual tricks, cast the 
magic that finally tore 
Guenevere from Arthur, 
ruining the kingdom and 
sending her and Lancelot into 
exile. 

Although the story was 
familiar, the costumes, acting, 
and magical air of the 
production transformed the 
ordinary stage from wood and 
steel into a medieval castle 
and changed high school 
students into magical 
characters of the past. 



MORDANT MORDRED . . . 

Antagonizing Arthur with the news 
that he is his illegitimate son, 
Mordred shows his vicious nature. 





KNKjHT TIME During a special FORBIDDEN LOVERS After 

celebration, Arthur knights several of sneaking into the castle, Lancelot 
his men. proclaims his love for Guenevere in a 

song. 



62/ Musical 



TCKJCH UP ... As seconds tick HEAVEN SENT . . . Extolling his 

away before the curtain rises, Andy own virtues, Lancelot relates his 

Austin helps Jim Durrett even up his great deeds and talents to Guenevere 

stage makeup. aruJ Arthur. 



'7 




HH 


^^ 


PI 




•JCXIST" FOR FON . . While 
Lancelot jousts with Arthur's knights, 
spectators anxiously view the 
chivalrous event. 


H 


ff. 


1. 

\ 


4 ^^^^^^^^^^^1 


THREE'S COMPANY . . . Imagining 
the life of simple folk, Guenevere, 
Arthur, and Pellinor share their 
happy thoughts. 

Musical/63 



SWINGING SINGERS . Swing 
Choir members Mary James and Lorl 
Rosebrock prepare for an upcoming 
show. 

FARRAH FAUCET? After a 

gruesome Golden Singers mudfight, 
Dawn Cooreman uses a nearby 
faucet to clean her hair. 




TORN THE PAGE Practicing for 

the Golden Singer's major work, 
Mark Dorsey attempts to sing the 
overly simplified bass part in Bach's 
Magnificat. 



MADRIGALS — Back Row: 
Courtney Spudic, Phil Sharpley, 
Mary Lahman Second Row: Tim 
Johnson, Jenny Moffatt, Lisa 
Cooreman, Tim Payne, Jeff 
Maddox, Susie Talbott, Gary 
Steele, Lee Richardson, Steve 
Badger, Jacque Hammonds, Mac 
Goode, Lori Rosebrock. 



64/Golden Singers 




) 




Year productive for Golden Singers 



He approached the piano as 
if he were walking that "last 
mile." Once he arrived at his 
destination, a waterfall of 
excuses and ailments gushed 
from his mouth — all to no 
avail. He was promptly 
ordered to stand up straight 
and sing. 

Reluctantly he complied as 
the talented fingers of Mrs. 
Lucinda Paul flew deftly 
across the piano keyboard; 
his solo had commenced. 
With a nervous vibration his 
voice box issued forth a 
medly of notes closer in 
resemblance to a hippo's 
mating call than the 
"Hallelujah Chorus." 

He was none other than a 



TICKLING THE IVORIES . . . With 
an encouraging grin, Mrs. Lucinda 
Paul leads Golden Singers through 
their vocal warm-ups. 



member of Ripple's 1981-82 
Golden Singers group. Singing 
solos was not the only way 
Golden Singers used their 
class time. It was also spent 
learning material and 
practicing for shows. 

Performances increased this 
year as more invitations to 
sing than ever before were 
received. Those outside 
shows were in addition to 
major programs at Christ 
Church Cathedral, the 
Madrigal Dinner, and the 
musical Camelot, which for 
the first time opened its 
auditions to the entire music 
department. 

Numerous money-making 
projects helped in the 
successful production of 
these programs. Projects 
included canvases, garage 
sales, a fund-raising dinner 
and a candy sale. Proceeds 
contributed to the purchasing 




of stoles, robes, music, and 
other materials needed for 
shows. 

These successful projects 
combined with increases in 
membership and 
performances kept Golden 
Singers busy and made it a 
productive school year. 



DOOBIE DUET . . . During a Swing 
Choir class, Stan Smith and Brett ■ 
Sommers learn the back-up vocals to 
a medley. 





1 



SWING CHOIR — Back Row: Nick 
Law, Peggy Calkins, Courtney 
Spudic, Mike Law. Second Row — 
Doug Miller, Lisa Cooreman, George 
Anderson, Mary Lahman, Phil 
Sharpley, Dawn Cooreman, Patrick 
Wisdom. Second Row: Mary Beth 
Blome, Judy Clemens, Jenny Moffatt, 
Lee Richardson, Lori Rosebrock, 
Shannon Harvey, Anita Hindman. 
Front Row: Andy Austin, Stan Smith, 
Tim Johnson, Kirk Brittain, Brett 
Somers, Tim Payne, Mac Goode, Jeff 
Maddox. 

GOLDEN SINGERS — Back Row: 
Doug Miller, Jenny Moffatt, Richard 
Curry, Lisa Cooreman, Brian Bill, 
Ann Cox, Clars Danvold, Lisa 
Lockwood, David Moriarity, Mary 
Lahman, Patrick Wisdom, Peggy 
Calkins, Richard Hazel, Dawn 
Cooreman, Phil Sharpley, Courtney 



Spudic, Nick Law. Second Row: 
Andrew Austin, Kelly Vale, Jeff 
Maddox, Mary Beth Blome, Tim 
Johnson, Angela Stotler, Mike Law, 
Heather Matthews, Mark Dorsey, 
Sally Roettger, Lee Richardson, Brett 
Sommers, Anna Bennett, Kirk 
Brittain, Shirley Robinson. Third Row: 
Mac Goode, Hunt Waycott, Anita 
Hindman, Jim Durrett, Maria Toles, 
Tim Payne, Berlynne Turner, Kenny 
Dixon, Jessica Woyna, Jeff Jackson, 
Tara Jackson, Rick Hasler, Maya 
Roth, Mike Johnson, Anitra Hyden, 
Kivye Barlow. First Row: Carolyn 
Mahoney, Judy Clemens, Steve 
Badger, Mary James, Stan Smith, 
Lori Rosebrock, Damon Davis, Stacey 
DeBruler, Dianne Link, Gary Steele, 
Suzy Talbott, Allen Johnson, 
Shannon Harvey, Michael Gant, 
Jacque Hammonds. 



Swing Choir/Madrigais/65 



Choirs tune up for performances 



Making their own music, 
Rcxrketaires, Ripplaires, and 
Concert Club performed at 
various events throughout the 
year. The Christmas Program 
and the Spring Festival 
became the highlights of the 
year, prompting weeks of 
preparation. 

The three choirs were 
directed by Mrs. Lucinda Paul 
with the help of Mrs. Donna 
Haddox as pianist. Mrs. 
Sharon Mustaklem taught 
Concert Club and Ripplaires 
while Rocketaires were taught 



by Mrs. Paul. Steve Hill 
commented, "Before I entered 
the class I had no idea that I 
could sing — now I really 
enjoy it!" 

Throughout the year, 
Ripplaires and Concert Club 
sang at nursing homes and 
churches. On March 24 the 
ninth-hour Concert Club 
performed in the All-City 
Soprano-Soprano-Alto Festival. 

The groups were arranged 
so members could learn the 
fundamentals of singing as 
well as participate in 



programs. At the end of the 
year, many students 
graduated from these groups 
and went on to Golden 
Singers, Swing Choir, or even 
Madrigals. 



SOLITARY SIMGER . . . Practicing in 
his Rocketaires class, Steve Hill, 
freshman, is singled out by the 
photographer's crafty lens. 

MANLY MELODIES . . . Performing a 
duet for Mrs. Lucinda Paul, Mark 
Lacy and Tony Finnell practice 
perfecting their voices. 





CONCERT CLUB — Back Row: 
Margaret Hughes, Alison 
Fenstermaker, Karen Davis, Michelle 
Marks, Vivian Covington, Taucsha 
Toby, Shauna Robinson, Stephanie 
Perry, Cynthia Crawford, Geraldine 
Eversole, Natalie Turner, Madeline 
Duncan. Second Row: Terri Harrel, 
Jennifer Burkley, Sabrina Alexander, 
Mary Henn, Shelly Chappel, Theresa 
Hayworth, Angela Chisholm, 
Elizabeth Cox, Bobbie Eldridge, 
Yvette Tyler, Tamra Covington. Front 
Row: Tain Price, Blanche Edwards, 
Jamie Woolsey, Sarah Harvey, Linda 
Welcher, Cynthia Hurn, Letina Moore, 
Denise Sluder, Jenny Foley. 



66/Choirs 




RIPPLAIRES — Back Row: 
Candance Edmonson, Kim Paugh, 
Heidi Fledderjohn, Michelle 
Essenberg, Rhonda Goldsberry, 
Tiffany Lach. Kim Highsaw, Cordia 



Richardson, Second Row: Maureen 
Graves, Susan Showalter, Dawn 
Wells, Sarah Rolle, Melinda Hart, 
Roxanne Means. Front Row; Melissa 
Hood, Laurel Klapper, Betsi Wiley. 



ROCKETAIRES — Back Row: Dan 
Petterson, Mark Miller, Kem Colbert, 
Tom Peeler, Kenny Washington, 
Kevin Well, Jerry Pickering, — Front 



Row: Jeff Jones, Michael Garrett, 
Derek Whitehouse, Matt Graham, 
Darryl Taylor, Mark Trottman. 



Choirs/67 



JAM SESSION Perfecting a 

mellow tune, Mr. Finnell conducts 
members of the jazz band. 




'''t 

^.m^* '- 


1 

1, 


i^ 

L. 




7. ": 






» 


^ --^ ^^ 



n o 



ORCHESTRA — Back Row: Wllliar 
Myers, Michael Homan. Front Row: 
James Barrow, Mike Pugh, Norita 
Reid, Michelle Sander, Wendy 
Braswell, Pam Johnson, Keewanna 
Brooks, Tony Brown, John Smith, 
Darrel Bivens. 



JAZZ BAND — Back Row: William 
Myers, Jay Vahle, Erin Patterson, 
Curtis Mickle, Nobel Smith. Second 
Row: Tim Jackson, Kenny Dixon, 
LaWanna Anderson, Paul Galloway, 
Lawrence Randolph, Travis Reed, 
Darrel Hampton, Michael Holman, 
Tony Pepper, Jerry Bond, Eric 
Garmany. Front Row: Anthony 
Avant, Sherman Stephens, Troy 
Brayton. 



68/ Band 




Ripple's musicians spice up sports season 



A home basketball game 
just would not be the same 
without the spirited melodies 
and lively rhythms of the 
Jazz Band. But band was not 
all fun. Members also 
prepared for and competed in 
the statewide jazz band 
contest at DePauw (Jniversity, 
Jan. 23, and earned first-place 
honors. The regional contest 
provided additional firsts and 
seconds. 

Mr. Rudolph Finnell, 
director of instrumental 
music, said, "I have seen 
great improvement in the 
performance of the band." He 
attributed this to the 
combination of incoming 



STEPPING oar . Percussion 
members of the band keep pace to 
their lively beat in the Veterans' Day 
Parade. 



Shortridge musicians and 29 
freshmen. 

The Marching Band 
continued its tradition of 
marching in the Veterans' 
Day Parade as well as 
performing at Butler 
University's Band Day in 
September. The band also 
entertained during the 
dedication of the new gazebo 



at the Governor's Mansion. 

Band Boosters, working to 
improve the instrumental 
program, sponsored a paper 
drive in January. During the 
spring instrumental students 
sold candy. 

Mr. Finnell, hoping to 
enlarge the department, 
planned for the band to give 
performances at junior highs 



throughout the city. He hoped 
to have 35 freshmen entering 
the program in the fall of 
1982. 



POCKER aP . . During a home 
basketball game, Billy Myers and Jay 
Vahle lead the crowd in the school 
song. 




MARCHING BAND — Back Row: 
Gary Fraction, Michael Garrett, 
Shannon Steward, Terryan Gleason, 
Tasha Tobey, Jamie Ridpath, Shauna 
Robinson, Bobbie Eldridge, Melanie 
Bibbs, Tom Peeler, Teddy Kennan. 
Eighth Row: Indria Woods, Rochelle 
Boyd, Caria Williams, Janie Sherrell, 
Janet Sherrell, Shelley Chappell. 
Seventh Row: Sandra McCracklin, 
Kelly Slack, Tanya Pugh, Anthony 
Avant, David Edmonds, Scott 
Callahan, Billy Myers, Geary Brown, 
Kevin Harris, Patsy Briscoe. Sixth 
Row: Lisa Cheatham, Keewanna 



Brooks. Michael Bowling, Leslie 
Grady, Curtis Mickle, James Schuck, 
Kevin McGill, Ghuck Feltner, Luther 
Mason, LaWanna Anderson, Steve 
Galloway, Nobel Smith, Crystal 
Miller. Fifth Row: Terry Harrell, Jeff 
Feltner, Sandy Pettrie, John Samson, 
Dave Chambers. John Overton, 
Kathleen Broder. Warren Harris, Lisa 
Steward, Travis Reed, Phil Reehling, 
Yolanda Jordan. Fourth Row: 
LaShelle Delaney. Kandra Jones, Erin 
Patterson, James Minks, Cheryl 
Bellinger, Sherman Stephens, John 
Crips, Eric Garmany, Chris Voelker, 



Leslie Jackson, Sandra Taylor. Third 
Row: Mary Mowlin, Joanie Dial, 
Derrick Wells, Robert Parrish, Nancy 
Bowman, Debbie Moore, Keith Miller, 
Eddie Moore, Chris Noel, Judy 
demons. Second Row: Lawrence 
Randolph, Tammy Beaupain, Kenny 
Dixon, Mr. RE. Finnell, April 
Hornbeck, Anne Daniell, Yolanda 
Boyd, Linda Gogulis, Eloise Finnell, 
Monica Bryant, Susan Glunt, Patricia 
Ursino. 



BLOW YOUR MIND Enjoying 

the magic of making music, Burt 
Parrish practices his saxophone in 
solitude. 



Orchestra/69 



WADE IN THE WATER Taking a 

break from a day of car-washing, 
Joenne Pope and Mark Miller cool off 
with a water fight. 

THE WAY IT WAS Recreating 

the signing of the Declaration, Doug 
Miller and Susie Talbott act out the 
musical 1776. 





Two new humanities traditions begin ? 



Gaily colored costumes, 
yuletide music that echoed 
sounds from the past and 
tempting aromas of savory 
holiday foods set the mood 
for the Madrigal Dinner, Dec. 
5. 

The extravagant festival, 
co-ordinated by the Center for 
the Humanities, recreated a 
medieval banquet consisting 
of traditional Christmas 
favorites, such as; plum 
pudding, wassail, roast beef 
and Yorkshire pudding. 

During the banquet, 
performances by various 
BRHS groups entertained 



guests. The Madrigals sang 
holiday music while the 
OBRC juggled, tumbled and 
jested. The Brass Choir also 
contributed to the festivities. 

Posing as lord and lady of 
the manor. Dr. Ron Dehnke 
and senior Berlynn Turner 
presided over the dinner. 

Mr. Ralph Bedwell, director 
of the Center for the 
Humanities, said, "The 
Madrigal Dinner involved 
interdisciplinary and 
interdepartmental 
cooperation." 

The Center for the 



Humanities also introduced a 
new approach to learning 
with its Walk-About Program. 
Mrs. Leigh Johnson 
coordinated the program 
enabling students to enrich 
their educations through 
community involvement. 

Mrs. Johnson said, "There 
are so many possibilities that 
we must decide what will 
best serve Broad Ripple." She 
hoped the new program 
would attract a large number 
of interested students to the 
Center for Humanities in 
future years. 



70/Humanities 





THE HOUSE THAT FRANK BUILT 

. . . Giving Frank Jerasa a little help, 
Larry Monger adds some pieces to a 
project for the 19th Century America 
Art Fair. 

HEAD GAMES . . . Carving a clay 
head in her Man and Society class, 
Debbie Millgate etches the mouth on 
her creation. 




HUMANITIES ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE: Heidi Fledderjohn, 
Michael Garret, Monica Bryant, 
Wendell Ray, Brian Bill, Joenne Pope, 
William Mays, Larry Monger, Lisa 
Lockwood, Patrick Wisdom. Susan 
Brummer, Keith Henderson, Beth 
Wilson, Maya Roth, Laurel Klapper, 
Rick Hasler, Cindy Bubenzer. 



Humanities/71 




DOGBLE TAKE Using mirrors to 

Improve their dancing. Rachel Riegel 
and Hannah Meadows work out on 
the exercise bar. 

SCOLPTaRED STUDENT . . . 

Striking a pose, Ansley Valentine, 
sophomore, takes part in a drama 
exercise. 



MERRY MINSTREL During a 

private flute lesson, Sally Roettger, 
sophomore, whistles out a tune on 
her flute. 



72/ Performing Arts 



J 



Ripple becomes new location for the SSPA 



Her feet defy the laws of 
gravity as she leaps and 
twists across the floor of the 
room. Her arms swirl 
gracefully around her head 
and dip low with the beat. 

Some sort of fanciful 
dream? On the contrary, it's 
just another dedicated dance 
student from the Shortridge 
School of Performing Arts 
(SSPA). 

The SSPA offered 
specialized training in visual 
arts, music, theater, dance, 
creative writing, and radio 
and television. SSPA was 
designed "to prepare students 
to be better able to select 
careers in the arts, to provide 
them with the opportunities 



to perform at the highest 
levels of their individual 
abilities, and to develop 
qualities which will enable 
them to become art leaders in 
the community." 

Students enrolling in SSPA 
submitted applications to a 
special review panel. Each 
application indicated the 
student's field of major 
interest. If his application was 
approved, the student 
attended an interview and 
submitted a portfolio or gave 
an audition, depending on his 
area of interest. 

In its first year at Broad 
Ripple, SSPA enrolled 80 
students. Only one-third of 
these came from Broad 



Ripple. Two-thirds attended 
from other high schools. 

Of these students, 
approximately 80 percent 
planned to pursue careers in 
fields related to their SSPA 
experiences. 

The change in the location 
of SSPA brought some 
changes in the operation of 
the program. When SSPA 
was located at Shortridge 
High School, students 
traveled to Butler University, 
Civic Theater, and various 
other places for classes. At 



DO, RE, ME . . . Warming up for her 
vocal music class, Anita Hindman, 
senior, prepares to sing a soprano 
solo. 



Broad Ripple most of the 
classes, except in radio and 
television, which was at the 
IPS Center for Instructional 
Radio and Television 
downtown, met within the 
school building. 

Mr. Barry Patrick, SSPA 
director, expressed his 
approval in the change: "With 
all the classes in one building, 
the program is easier to 
manage." 



PRESSING PROBLEMS After 

working hard all day, Mr. Barry 
Patrick, S.S.P.A. director, signs a 
letter before going home. 




NOTEWORTHY . . . Working hard on 
a written music assignment, Zanna 
Mitchell adds the finishing touches 
before the bell rings. 



CHALK ONE UP .. . Sketching with 
chalk in a visual arts class. Melissa 
Hendrickson shades in a picture 
during class. 



Performing Arts/73 



Art classes brush-up on technique 



As the final stroke of paint 
is brushed upon the canvas, 
any art student is overcome 
by the feeling of achievement. 
By expressing his feelings in 
an artistic way, a student 
learns art basics and design. 
Senior Jacques Hammonds 
explained that art has 
broadened her techniques and 
knowledge. 

Art classes at BR took 
many steps forward in 1981- 
82. Mr. John Haynes, Mrs. 
Garnetta Hood, and Mrs. 
Corrie Wilson were additions 
from Shortridge High School 
to the Art Department. 

Students involved in art 



were not confined only to the 
classrooms; some became 
involved in the Art Club and 
photography. The popularity 
of photography at BR inspired 
sponsor Mr. Sheldon Kantor 



*i think art classes at 
BR have helped me to 
learn more about art 
and introduce me to 
many new techniques." 

to form the Photography 
Club. It gave students the 
chance to explore art beyond 
the classroom. 



Art Club members earned a 
first place award for their car 
in the homecoming parade. 
With the help of students in 
art classes, Art Club also 
created medieval banners for 
the musical Camelot, and the 
Madrigal Dinner. 

With all the displays of 
vivid imagination and 
concentration, BR students 
became aware of the abilities 
of the Art Department and its 
students. 



STICKY BUSIMESS . Starting 
with an old bottle, an art student 
turns nothing into something with 
string. 





FINISHING aP . . Putting in the 
final details, Curtis Maxey, junior, 
adds a few touches to painting done 
in his advanced at class. 



PHOTO CLUB . . . Back Row: 
William Terry, Angela Watts, Tom 
Peeler, Ron Stone, Jeff Wise, 
Stephanie Powe. Second Row: 
Patricia (Jrsino, Deborah Wehr, Mary 
Beth Long, Susan Glunt, Candace 
Edmondson. Front Row: Latanya 
Frierson, Tanya Pugh, Yanita Austin, 
Mr. Sheldon Kantor. 

RODIN AT WORK . . . Designing a 
unique pot, Carolyn Mahoney, senior, 
concentrates on smoothing the edges 
out of the clay. 



74/Art 




THE SPIM OF THINGS . . . Guiding 
the wheel to create a special shape, 
Beth Crabb, senior, finds that the key 
to nnaking a pot is all in the touch. 




BY NUMBER? ... Not likely. 
Stroking the paper with a gentle 
brush swing, an art student checks 
the results. 

ART CLGB — Back Row: Richard 
Goodnight, Larry Monger, Keith 
Henderson, George Anderson, Patrick 
Wisdom, Kirk Brittain, Stanley Smith. 
Second Row: Amy Rees, Anna 
Bennett, Harry Watts, Michael 
Matthews, Warren Hollins, Tracy 
Swatts. Front Row: Jacque 
Hammonds, Laura Lacy, Tara 
Jackson, Rachel Riegel, Carolyn 
Mahoney, Mrs. Alyce Wilson. 



Art/ 75 



BR trades on Foreign Exchange 



With a suave air and a 
decidedly foreign swagger, the 
cosmopolitan made his 
entrance, "Guten Tag, Frau," 
he huskily whisp>ered, only to 
have his pronunciation 
corrected and a request for 
his homework made. 

Besides the basics this 
year, German Club attended a 
convention with german clubs 
from all over Indiana. After 
the convention there was a 
Faschingstanz, (a mardi gras) 
with costumes, German food 
and a live band. 

Broad Ripple became a 
"second school" to German 
exchange student Annette 
Fauteck, who added a little 
German spirit to BRHS. 
Annette said, "School here is 



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HELPING 'AGS' . . . While first-year 
German students patiently listen, 
Frau Christie Moulton explains how 
to translate sentences. 



totally different. In Germany 
we stay in the classroom and 
the teacher comes to us." 

From Clovis to Mitterrand, 
French students explored 
history, as well as literature, 
politics, grammar and 
customs. While participating 
in the IG Honors Program, 
Tim Johnson and Helene 
Riggs lived in France for eight 
weeks last summer. They 
were two of 32 high school 
students to take part in the 
program. Helene and Tim 
continued with French 910 
this year. 

QUIZ KIDS . . . Advanced German 
students Will Collins, Richard 
Creveling and Yvonne Reid take a 
quiz from German exchange student 
Annette Fauteck. 



The French Club, an 
activity open to all level 
French students, held a pitch- 
in dinner this year as well as 
their annual hay-ride Mile. 
Sylvija Dzelme sponsored the 
club and Larry Monger was 
president. 

All of the foreign language 
clubs gathered together in a 
Christmas spirit to have a 
holiday party. They 
exchanged cultural habits of 
the holiday activities by 
singing carols and playing 
games. 



DRAMATIC EXPERIENCE . . . While 
acting out German phrases with 
Denise Bowling and Michael Bowling, 
Freshman Steve Hill shows his 
theatrical tendencies. 




FRENCH CLOB — Back Row: 
Melanie Hubbard, Heather Matthews, 
Rodana Bury, Larry Monger, George 
Anderson, Alicia Woods, Richard 
Hazel. Lisa Lockwood, Anna Bennett. 
Michelle Brooks. Third Row: Mark 
Lacy, Maria Todd, Monica Bryant, 
Sandra Petrie, Tracy Swatts, 
Barnettia Buckner, Yvette Perry, 
Courtney King, Maya Roth, Julie 
Adams, Susie Talbott. Second Row: 
Evelyn Davis, Elizabeth Cox, Jeff 
Jones, Mary Henn, Susan Glunt, 
Patricia (Jrsino, Kim McBrady. Bobby 
Eldridge. Front Row: Laurel Klapper, 
Allen Johnson, Marilyn Smith, Susan 
Burns, Kelly Evans, Lana Rose, 
Rosemary Miles, Parastoo Behroozi. 



76/German 






GERMAN CLUB — Back Row: Mike 
Reid, Steve Hill, Nathan Price, 
Richard Hazel, Vicki Rose, Yolanda 
Boyd, Front Row: Denise Bowling, 
Michael Bowling, Anna Bennett, 
Karen Ovelton, Chris Meguschar, 
Yvonne Reld. 



FRENCH CaiSINE . With a grin 
on her face, Tiffany Lach attempts to 
get Alicia Woods to eat during a skit, 
while Shawndra Miller looks on. 

LINE-UP . . . Standing up in front of 
the classroom, several students learn 
how to form interrogative sentences 
during the first-year German class. 



French/ 77 



Latin, Spanish broaden horizons 



Did you ever wonder where 
words came from? 

Were you ever asked 
Cuanto anos tienes? 

If you were a student of 
Latin or Spanish at Broad 
Ripple, you might be able to 
answer yes to one or both 
questions. 

Latin classes enabled 
students to examine the 
culture of the ancient Greco- 
Roman World that greatly 
influenced modern culture 
and language. The study of 
Latin helped a student to 
strengthen his English skills, 
increase his vocabulary, and 
develop accuracy, 
persistency, and logical 
thinking. 

Students of Spanish studied 
the culture of Spanish people 
and their language to gain a 
better understanding of 
themselves and awareness of 
others. By studying Spanish 
grammar, students gained a 




WATCH CLOSELY ... An opaque 
projector is one visual aid frequently 
used by the Spanish class. Here, Mr. 
Alejandro Hernandez explains a 
lesson to his Spanish class. 



better understanding of the 
English grammar. 

All Latin and Spanish study 
was not confined to the 
classroom. Many students 
participated in the Latin Club 
and Spanish Club programs. 

Latin Club's year began 
strongly as the club's 
homecoming float won 
second place. From there 
things got even better. The 
club participated in the 
signing of a proclamation by 
Gov. Robert Orr designating 
the first week of December as 
Latin Week. 

Also in December, the club 
celebrated the Roman holiday 
Saturnalia and attended the 
foreign language department's 



STICKY BUSINESS Gooey 

masses of papiermache were 
transformed into shapes by Spanish 
students Matt Lyman, Terry Scates, 
and Alecia Salsberry in their Spanish 
Class. 



Christmas party. In February 
the Latin Club and classes 
attended the Latin Day hosted 
by Butler University. To top 
off the year, club members 
participated in the county- 
wide Roman Banquet at La 
Scala restaurant. 

Spanish Club also had a 
successful year. In October 
the members attended the 
annual foreign language 
department hayride at Stoney 
Creek Farm. For the 
Christmas season the club 
made pinatas and at the end 
of the year, a Spanish 
guitarist entertained club 
members at Chi-Chi's 
restaurant. 



BOARD MEETING . . . Translation of 
Latin phrases was a task that Lori 
Williams attempts to tackle at the 
board during her Advanced Latin 
class. 




un^^ 



78/ Latin, Spanish 





IT'S RIGHT HERE Locations of 

the Roman Empire are pointed out 
by Andy Neff to Kurt Maxey. As well 
as language, the students studied 
geography and history. 

LATIN CLUB — Back Row: Dan 
Patterson, William Mays, Scott 
Stevens, George Anderson, Alecia 
Woods, Keith Henderson, Neil 
Williamson, Larry Monger. Second 
Row: Michael Garmany, Tracy 
Swatts, Wendell Ray, Ceil Chanin, 
Edward Blaine, Tanya Stokes, Tasha 
Wagner. First Row: Harold Jameson, 
Albertina Taylor, Tanya Pugh, Anita 
Hindman, Lori Williams, Shawna 
Johnson, Donna Smith, Pam 
Stallworth. 






SPANISH CLOB — Back Row: 
Wendell Ray, Karen Doty, Keith 
Henderson, Rouzbeh Behroozi, Vicky 
Rose. First Row: Jacqueline 
Hammonds, James Evans, Mike 
Lazar, Elizabeth Laughlin, Amy Rees. 



Latin, Spanish/79 



SCREEN TEST Watching a 

lesson via television, Mick Law learns 
at>out topic sentences during his 
advanced comp. class. 

ADDRESSING THE PUBLIC . . 

Prefjaring for an upcoming speech 
tournament. Maya Roth recites her 
speech in front of the class. 




80/English, Social Studies 




English 'write' on mark 



From gerunds and clauses 
to President Reagan's 
economic program and world 
crisis, the Broad Ripple 
English and social studies 
classes covered it all. 

While some English classes 
stressed the study of basic 
grammar, other classes were 
introducing students to the 
writing of stimulating authors 
such as Hawthorne and 
Steinbeck. A new course, 
Writing For A Reason, was 
added to Broad Ripple's 
curriculum. It was unique in 
that it was taken not from a 
teacher, but by individual 
students working from a 



WRITER'S CRAMP . 

Concentrating on his subject, Clars 
Danvold writes an essay, which made 
him an N.C.T.E. finalist. 



videotape. 

In the social studies area, 
Broad Ripple welcomed the 
rebirth of a club to its list of 
extra-curriculir activities, the 
Junior Historical Society. 
They plan to refurbish the 
club's campaign button 
collection. 

In the English department, 
the speech team was 
inexperienced but had 
potential for next year. Also, 
Senior Clars Danvold won 
first place in the NCTE 
writing contest for students of 
English with his story, "The 
Boy and the Butterfly." 



CONCENTRATION With an 

open book and a receptive ear, Anna 
Harper listens to a lecture during her 
economics class. 




LESSON PLANS . . . Gesturing with 
her hands, Mrs. Doris Young explains 
romanticism to her 19th Century 
America class. 




SPEECH TEAM — Back Row: Maya 
Roth, J. A. Lacy, Anthony Caudle, 
Tom Peeler, Ansly Valentine, Heather 
Matthews, Mrs. Dolly Davis. Front 
Row: Nadene Speares, Tara Jackson, 
Stephanie Powe, Sally Roettger, Liz 
Cox, Stephanie Skinner, Betsy Wiley. 



English, Social Studies/81 



WATER? . . . Yes, believe it or not, 
this is a model of a water molecule 
designed to aid students in the lab 
science classes. 




SCIENCE CLOB — Back Row: 
Anthony Caudle, Michelle Bledsoe, 
Delvin Bullock, Mr. Eric Broadus. 
Front Row: Donna Washington, Kim 
McBrady, Rosemary Miles, Valerie 
Bankhead. 



BLOCKBUSTERS Measuring the 

weight of a wooden block, Kivya 
Barlow and Teresa Chubbs complete 
a physics experiment. 



82/ Science 



iJ^'-i 



SPACED-OUT . Students prepare 
to observe the wonders of the 
universe in the Broad Ripple 
Planetarium. 





Science opens minds 



The chemists donned their 
aprons and secured their 
goggles to prepare themselves 
for two periods in the world 
of science. Their experiments 
would enable them to better 
grasp the properties of 
chemical reactions. 

For those students willing 
to move up the science 
education ladder, advanced 
biology and physics classes 
were offered. If a student did 
not have a strong stomach 
for dissecting in the biology 
classes, physics could serve 
as an alternative course. 
There students were taught 
the properties of matter and 



PIECE BY PIECE Students 

Denise Huse and Danny Powell 
construct a DMA molecule. 



energy. Senior Mark Dorsey 
said, "Physics is a very 
demanding class, and while at 
times I'm perplexed and 
distraught, I usually grasp a 
firm hold of the concepts 
Involved." 

For those students not 
interested in the laboratory 
sciences, astronomy 
presented a chance to explore 
the universe. Instead of being 
taught in an ordinary 
classroom, the class often 
met in the Broad Ripple 
Planetarium, displaying an 
almost life-like universe. 

The Science Club, 
sponsored by Mr. Eric 
Broadus, added extra- 
curricular science activities. 
The club hoped to enable 
students to explore science in 
an in-depth, informal way, 
free from the classroom 
atmosphere. 



Science/83 



'Brain Game' adds up 



The Pythagorean Theorem, 
Ohms Law, and the 
Trapezoidal Rule: tongue 
twisters and brain strainers 
like these plagued hundreds 
of Ripplites all year. From 
algebra to calculus, students 
attempted to apply the 
fundamental functions of 
math. 

Early this fall RoseHulman, 
along with Saint Mary-ofthe- 
Woods College, spwDnsored a 
select high school math 
contest. Eight students from 
Broad Ripple entered (two 
from each grade), with 
sophomores Mike Johnson 
and Maya Roth receiving 
awards. 

The "Brain Game" team 
began their season under the 
TV lights with a match 
against Northwest in 
November. After a 60-48 win 
"Brain Game" faced a two- 
month practice period before 
its next game. The time paid 
off with a win against Warren 
Central, 62-58, advancing the 



team to third-round action. 
The team headed into a 
winning season with three 
members — Mike Johnson, 
Tim Johnson, and Maya Roth 

— returning from last year's 
squad. Others on the team 
included Clars Danvold, Jim 
Durrett, Matt Graham, and 
Dan Patterson. 

With all the formulas and 
facts absorbed during the 
year, the only problem left 
was for students to remember 
them. a^=b^ + c^-2bc cos A 
. . . was it the Law of 
Cosines, the Rolles Theorem 

— or what? 



PRIME TIME . . . After tallying up 
the fxjints, Bob Gregory reveals 
Broad Ripple as the victor in its first 
round match. 

"BRAIN GAME" . . . Team members 
Matt Graham, Tim Johnson, Mike 
Johnson and Maya Roth ponder a 
question midway through the match. 




J \ 

J 

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^rainQame 





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DEEP THOOGHT . Concentrating 
on math functions, calculus students 
review for a test the following day. 



84/Brain Game 




COMPOTER KID Punching his 

program into the Honeywell 
computer, Todd Snyder is impressed 
by the final read-out. 



Math/85 



lOL — Back Row: Crystal Miller, 
LaChelle Carter, Sharon Reed, Jan 
Morris, Connie Contrell. Second Row; 
April Davidson, Karyn Ovelton, 



Cheryl Colbert, Angie Warren, Miss 
Burroughs. First Row; Yvette Penrick, 
Denise Mayfield, Esther Madden, 
Crlsty Guthrie. 



SPEAKEASY A guest speaker at 

the DECA Breakfast discusses the 
options of entering a business career. 




86 



9 TO 5 ... An lOL class is busy at 
their desks during one of their 
classes. 

COE — Back Row; Mrs. Beene 
Caria Ward, Kormen Lolla, LaChelle 
Carter, Tracey Lak, Margie Brown, 
Jackie Norton, Janise Hilliard, 
Patricia Collins. Second Row; Stacey 
Radfford, Cheryl McMillin, Zenophia 
Fitzgerald, Anna Maxwell, Linda 
Cunningham, Marta Redd, Lisa Rose, 
Theresa Collins, Denise Bonds. Front 
Row: Deborah Young, Donna Rippy, 
Jackie Smith, Anya Lawrence, Marie 
Jessup, Tonya McCracken, Donna 
Hughs. 

DECA — Back Row: Gary Hatcher, 
Carl Kraus, Andy Herod, Micheal 
Murff, Ted Miller, Steven Daniels, 
„Dean Johnson, Andrew Smith, Mariel 
Williams, Jerry Rasdell, Tim Avery, 
Kirt Maxey. Fifth Row: Danny 
Byrnes, Linda Gibson, Tammy 
Johnson, Cheryl Davis, Ronald 
Sanders, Zack Cooper, Bryon Ross, 
James Davis, Jessica Barker, Latonia 
McMiller, Belinda Taylor. Shannon 
Brooks. Fourth Row; Tracey Ranelin, 
Devita Keller, Carman Turientine, 
CarIa Stratton, Tim Brown, Terance 
Crumpton, Phillip Adams, Adrian 
Cushenbury, Tangela Sanders, Janice 
Sherrell, Janet Sherrell. THIRD ROW; 
Wilbur Braxton. Erin Wells, Wendy 
Rumpel!. Valerie Turner, Emily 
Young, Kevin Kennedy, Mary Taylor, 
Cherri Walker, Tracey Gray, Elaine 
Miller, Melissa Baker, Marilyn 
Coleman, James Deffendall, Kelly 
Fisher, Linda Edmund, Yvonne Ried, 
Katie Collins, Diedre Smith. Second 
Row: Melissa Webb, Kevin Vinson, 
John Ligen, Fred Garrett, Mark 
Hendron, James Day, Ronnie 
McBuddy. Darryl Hampton, Kim 
Floyd, Donna Smith, Susan 
Richardson, Dana Shy. Reginna 
Neville, Pam Moore. Front Row: Terri 
Fisher, Charita Williams, Charmele 
Warrens. Helen Childs, Deneen 
Peterson, Charita Williams. Lashall 
Delony. Cynthia Brown, Vivian Smith. 



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BR aets the business 



The time . . . 10:18 a.m. 
The place . . . Broad Ripple 
High School. The setting . . . 
a business office. But was it? 

In actuality, this business 
office was an Intensive Office 
Laboratory (lOL) class. lOL 
was designed to duplicate a 
business office in work 
performed, the equipment and 
the atmosphere. The students 
not only took classes at BR, 
but they also worked three 
periods a day for credits and 
pay. 

About 1200 students 
enrolled in the business 
classes at BR. The classes 
included typing, accounting, 
shorthand, business 



DESK DUTIES . . As Cheryl 
Colbert finishes up her work, she 
waits for the bell to ring. 



machines, careers, business 
law, lOL and Distributive 
Education, (DE). 

lOL, DECA, Cooperative 
Office Experience (COE), and 
Office Education of America 
(OEA) provided club activity 
for business students. Outside 
of the ordinary business 
world, DECA members took a 
Thanksgiving basket to a 
needy family. 

DECA members also 
participated in a business 
contest in Martinsville in 
February. At a breakfast in 
November, speakers 
counseled them on entering 
business careers. 



RACE AGAINST TIME . BR. 

students race to beat a time deadline 
in typing class. 



Business/87 



HARPER AND ROW? Printing 

student Jermas McMeal prepares the 
printing press for an issue of the 
Riparian-Echo. 

A STITCH IM TIME . . . Noticing a 
flaw in a sewing project, a clothing 
student points it out to a fellow 
classmate. 




Departments expand mentally and physically 



When you think of 
expansion in the industrial 
arts classes, you may think 
of the curriculum actually 
being taught in the 
classrooms. However, this 
year expansion meant 
enlarging facilities and 
adding new staff 
members. 

The first of the expansions 
was a vocational printing 
laboratory. The lab enabled 
an inhouse production of the 
Riparian-Echo. A 
Compugraphic computer was 
installed in the lab to assist in 
the typesetting for the 



newspaper. Plans also called 
for the printing lab to be 
physically expanded to 
encompass the old 
mechanical drawing room. 

The department also 
expanded its staff. Mr. Walter 
Mendel taught vocational 
printing while Mr. Donald 
McCauley was responsible for 
the actual printing. Also, Pat 
Bauer joined the staff to 
teach Printing III. 

Students who plan to take 
architectural drawing must 
successfully complete 
Mechanical Drawing III. Many 
colleges now require these 



courses taken in high school 
before entering architectural 
schools. 

With courses offered in 
clothing and cooking, along 

"Mechanical drawing 
is preparing me to go 
on in college, so I may 
continue and pursue my 
career." 



with classes involving child 
development and family 
planning, students were 
offered a well-rounded 



education in home 
economics. 

Family living and family 
health classes offered many 
facets of family life and 
organization. These classes 
gave students a clear view of 
what a future family life 
would bring. 

Expansion physically and 
mentally was the motto for 
both industrial arts and home 
economics departments in 
1981-82. and it proved to be 
the right one in developing 
students for the years ahead. 



88/ Home Economics 



CARDIAC ARREST Two auto 

mechanics students carefully operate 
on a car used in class to learn 
various techniques. 



GREASED LIGHTNIMG Students 

in an auto mechanics class spend 
their free time "cruising" around. 





IMDOSTRIAL COOPERATIVE 
TRAINING — Back Row: Mr. LeMar 
Barnett. Timothy Jelks, Oliver 
Jefferson, Charles Brown, Rich 
Thorman, Reginald Perry, Chris 
Henzel. Second Row; Luther Collier, 
Torin Harris, Johnny Cowherd, Mark 
Alexander, Anthony demons, 
Sherman Grayson, Demetrius 
Edwards, Lea Grubbs. First Row: 
Sherry Cooper, Connie Cotteral, 
Michael Lazar, Derrick Dixon, Reuben 
Davis, Monica Martin, Robert Arnold. 



FOTURE HOMEMAKERS OF 
AMERICA — Sheila Sharp, Dawn 
Rasdall, Debra Young, Jessica 
Barker. Laurita Shields, Tina 
Edmonds, Felicia Bruce, Mrs. Patricia 
Maggard. 



Industrial Arts/89 



GIRLS' DRILL TEAM — Back Row: 
Lisa Bush, Deanne Jarvar, Sherry 
Davis, Leona Greene. Third Row: 
Arlene Jefferson, Karen Baily, 
Darlene Yelladay, Rodetta Grant, 



April McCannons, Roxanne Means. 
Second Row: Maureen Graves, Nola 
Jones, Anita Bush, Janice West, 
Vivian Covington. Front Row: Vivian 
Marshall. 



RIFLE TEAM — Back Row: Michael 
Reeves, Rodney Van Horn, Vincent 
Yelladay, John Lawry. Front Row: 
Janice Hayes, Steven Yelladay, 
Willbert Brayton, Tom Knapp. 




90/ROTC 




'M ROTC marches onward 



The group of students 
could be immediately 
recognized: green garb, golden 
bars, stripes and gleaming 
black shoes identified them 
as JROTC cadets. 

JROTC ended the 1980-81 
school year with two formal 
events. First there was the 
Military Ball at the 
Convention Center. Later 
came the Cadet "DressGp 
Day," when JROTC cadets 
donned their civvies, suits 
and dress for the day. The 
BR Unit also marched in the 
Memorial Day Parade as the 
school year prepared to close. 

As the 1981-82 school year 



COLOR GUARD — Back Row: 
Connie Cottrell, Cordia Richardson, 
Daniel Chubbs. Front Row: Damon 
Brown. Vincent Yelladay, Derrick 
Wells. 

BOYS' DRILL TEAM — Back Row: 
Vincent Yelladay, Gary Fraction, 
Rodney Van Horn, Akia Saulsbury. 
Second Row: Ben Meadows, Gary 
Brown, Jerry Pickering, Bill Marshall. 
Front Row: Michael Reeves. 



opened, the corps could be 
found cleaning the bleachers 
after football games. Another 
service performed by cadets 
was escorting parents through 
the building during Open 
House. 

The drill team began its 
practice early to prepare for 
meets. These area meets 
provided the team with the 
chance to compete with other 
JROTC units. JROTC cadet 
Didi Saluppo commented, 
"ROTC means being able to 
be a leader and enjoy yourself 
while making friends and 
having a chance to win a 
scholarship, all at once." 
Another cadet. Junior Sheria 
Smith, said, "It was an 
exciting experience being able 
to participate in ROTC. I had 
fun!" 



TROPHY DASH Admiring a 

trophy won by the girls' drill team, 
Charmel Warren and Kimberly Long 
prepare it for display. 




OFFICERS — Back Row: Michael 
Reeves, Vincent Yelladay, Gary 
Brown, Sinclair Bulluck, Damon 
Brown, John Callahan, Ben Meadows. 



First Row: Rene Arnold, Felicia 
Bruce. Cynthia Marshall, Sherida 
Smith, Dee-Dee Saluppo, Leslie Ray, 
Tammy Johnson, Steven Yelladay. 



ROTC/ 91 



Health brushes up; 
PE classes work out 



The bell rang and Nick O. 
Teen slipped quietly into his 
seat. The topic of the day's 
lesson was the effect that 
smoking has on the lungs. 
Startled, Nick clutched at the 
package of cigarettes in his 
shirt pocket. 

In health courses students 
learned about the negative 
effects of drugs, tobacco and 
alcohol. At the same time 
they discovered ways to 
better take care of 
themselves and heard lectures 
on the different systems of 
the body. The department 
also made plans to add an 
advanced health class in the 
second semester as an option 
for students interested in 
health careers. 

While health classes 
discussed ways to protect 
students' bodies, physica 
education classes gave 
students the opfxjrtunity to 



do something about it. By 
playing such games as 
basketball and volleyball, and 
exercising, students were able 
to work at being fit. While 
not all students reveled in 
taking health and P.E., the 
required courses enabled 
them to learn the basics. 



JAWS III ... Health classes use 
teeth to demonstrate proper brushing 
techniques. 




\ 




: 



SHOOTIMG THE HOOP Gynn 

pupils look on as David Hatcher 
takes a shot from the free throw line 



92/Physical Education 




WHO ME? ... In gym class Chrystal SMILE . . . After hearing a 
Jet waits her turn to shoot a basket. presentation on dental hygiene, 

Tammy Sanders flosses her teeth. 



AND UP . . . With situps and other 
various exercises, Chrystal Jet, 
Robert Parker, and Tracy Whitaker 
start their gym class. 

MIRROR, MIRROR . . . Preparing to 
brush his teeth, Steven Glunt 
receives a mirror from dental 
assistant Jeanie Hansen. 




BRUSHING UP . As part of the 
day's lesson, a health student 
practices the correct way to brush 
teeth. 



Health/93 






combined ^s 9 ^^,^ the ^^.^^^^g f ^Jab^ed ^^^ J ^on 

assistant ^P^ ^.^ ^ab^n 
printing o* '" 



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study ^»«- 





TYPE CAST . . . Fulfilling one of the 
tasks of his position as a dutiful 
adviser, James Ray helps type copy 
on deadline night. 



WORKIN' 9-5 . Facing the 
pressures of the weekly deadline, RE 
staffers work on materials for the 
next issue persistently. 

RIPARIAN-ECHO STAFF — Back 

Row: Allen Johnson, Maya Roth, 
Mimi Gatens, Kris Voelker, Matt 
Graham, Dan Patterson. Second Row: 
Amy Weickert, Michael Johnson, 
Cindy Bubenzer, Susan Showalter, 
Susan Brummer, Chris Noel, 
Susannah Grimes, Mary James. Front 
Row: Cheryl Bellinger, Stephanie 
Skinner, Stan Miller, Yvette Perry, 
Lori Rosebrock, Liz Grimes, Keith 
Henderson, Steve Badger. 



94/Mewspaper 



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AS GOOD AS A XEROX 

Preparing copy for the RE, Chris 
Noel, sophomore, helps Mr. Donald 
McCauley, printer, adjust the 
typesetter. 



LIGHT BRIGHT . . Pasting up 
pages of the R-E, Liz Grimes, co- 
editor, and Stan Miller, news editor, 
paste up one of the weekly issues. 



rSewspa per/95 



Deadlines drag staff into darkness 



Amidst overflowing 
wastepaper baskets, 
constantly clattering 
typewriters, and abandoned 
take-out dinners, several 
Ripplites remained at school 
past 8 p.m. to meet 
deadlines. 

Having received several 
national awards in past years, 
BR had a tradition of quality 
yearbooks to uphold. Editors 
Sue Appel, Beth Hill, Tim 
Johnson, and Sandy Miller 
initiated changes in the 
Riparian in an effort to 
increase its appeal. 

Yearbook staff members 
hoped to sell more yearbooks 



by offering a book more 
representative of all Ripplites 
than in past years. The drive 
to sell more yearbooks, 
however, did not noticeably 
increase sales, prompting 
staffers to sell candy in an 
attempt to meet the ever- 
increasing cost of yearbook 
production. 

A half-credit English 
course, yearbook class 
attracted over 60 freshmen 
through seniors. In 
preparation for the task, 
Appel and Hill attended a 
workshop at I. (J. during the 
summer. Nine other staffers 
participated in a one-week 



workshop at Ball State. 

Awards were presented at 
the annual Journalism Dinner 
sponsored by Quill and Scroll 
an honor society for 
journalistic-minded Ripplites. 

James Ray, formerly of 
Northwest, became adviser to 
both the yearbook and Quill 
and Scroll. 




96/Yearbook 




HANGING LOOSE . . . Wishing to 




release their anxieties, Editors Sandy 




Miller, Tim Johnson, Beth Hill and 




Susan Appel "let it all hang out." 




TEAMWORK . . . Planning their 




sports spread, Michael Sherman and 




Jeff Jackson, sophomores, consult 




each other. 






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CLERICAL CHORES . Arranging 
the pictures of Ripplites in order, 
sophomores Jenni Bigham and Kelly 
Shaw work methodically. 



YEARBOOK STAFF — Back Row; 
Michael Johnson, Sandy Miller, Tracy 
Ranelin, Stanley Smith, Tanya Pugh, 
Heidi Fledderjohn, J. A. Lacy, Maya 
Roth, Chris Barnhart. Third Row: Jeff 
Jackson, Allen Johnson, Jim Durrett, 
Mark Miller, Amy Essenberg, Doug 
Miller, Rhonda Goldsberry, Dawn 
Cooreman, Susan Glunt, Michael 



PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF — Back 
Row: Beth Buddenbaum, Stan Miller, 
Amy Weichert. Front Row: Mimi 
Gatens, Jim Durrett, Sandy Miller, 
Michael Johnson, Susan Showalter. 

Sherman. Second Row: Amy 
Weichert, Mimi Gatens, Peggy 
Calkins. Annette Fauteck, Patricia 
(Jrsino. Front Row: Jenny Moffatt, 
Michelle Essenberg, Tara Jackson, 
Sarah Harvey, Stephanie Skinner, 
Jenni Bigham, Linda Welcher, Beth 
Buddenbaum. 



Yearbook/97 



Positive year gives Council boost 



Boosting its membership 
from 12 to 53, Student 
Council has become 
increasingly more active 
during the last three years. 
Throughout the year Student 
Council participated in nine 
monthly projects, including a 
canned foods collection for 
the Salvation Army. 

During January, Student 
Council hosted the all-city 
Student Council Workshop. 
The program was attended by 
30 from city high schools 



councils. Guest speakers 
taught citizen and leadership 
workshops. The purpose of 
the program was to try to 
bring city schools closer 
together and attempt to work 
out common problems. 

Other activities included 
Toys for Teens, Teacher 
Appreciation Week, 
Homecoming and Student 
Leadership Day. All activities 
considered, it seemed a very 
productive year for Student 
Council. Advisor Mrs. Cheryl 



McManama commented, "We 
were very fortunate to have a 
fine group of future leaders." 

Another group of future 
leaders, National Honor 
Society (NHS), also played an 
important role in the bettering 
of our school. In January, 
NHS organized a party for 
honor society members from 
other schools. Other projects 
for NHS included participating 
in Homecoming, Christmas 
skating party for oprhans, 
and induction in the spring. 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY — 

Back Row: Wendell Ray, Ann Cox, 
Larry Monger, Tim Johnson, Mark 
Dorsey, George Anderson, Mike Law, 
Williann Mays, Liz Grimes, Adrian 
Cushenbury, Scott Steele. Third Row: 
Miss Barbara Vargo, Anna Bennett, 
Sherry Maxey, Vicky Rose, James 
Schuck, Gary Steele, Pam Stailworth, 
Rene Arnold, Steve Badger, Beth Hill. 
Second Row: Yvette Perry, Mike 
Lazar, Cheryl Bellinger, Susan Appel, 
Martha Redd, Denise Bowling, Lori 
Williams, Ericka Guthrie, Mary 
James. Front Row: Kathy Stahl, 
Tuyet Vu, Theresa Chubbs, Helene 
Riggs, Lori Rosebrock, Donna Smith, 
Cristy Guthrie. 

CALORIE COUNTERS . Hundreds 
of love-struck Ripplites sent 
valentines to their sweethearts. 
Student Council organized and ran 
the candy-gram sale. 



98/ National Honor Society 



•ITS LIKE THIS" Making sure 

everythmcj goes smoothly, Lowell 
Jackson, head of the Mental H" '*' 
Association in Indianapolis exp, 
the I ~-4..^- 'T¥iai¥iinfl °"* 9'^'^ 



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SraOENT COUNCIL — Back Row: 
Debbie Milgate, Michael Garmany, 
Sherry Maxey, William Mays, George 
Anderson, Alicia Woods, Anthony 
Caudell, Larry Monger, Stephanie 
Perry, Sabrina Lutz, Steve Godfrey. 
Third Row: Monica Bryant, Kim 
White, Kathy Coleman, Yvette Perry, 
Candice Edmondson, Paula Foster, 
Caria Williams, Tracey Ranelin, 



Stephanie Grider, Sandra Petri. 
Second Row: Karen Holmes, 
Elizabeth Cox, Michelle Rief, Maria 
Todd, Lisa Stewart, Denise Wynn, 
Michelle Sanner, Mike Lazar, Sonia 
Wagner, Mrs. Cheryl McNanama. 
Front Row: CarIa Stratton, Tracy 
Whittaker, Kelly Evans, Elaine 
Chenault, Lana Rose, Yvonne Reid, 
Albertina Taylor, Stephanie Powe. 



WRAPPERS DELIGHT Doing her 

part in Student Council's November 
activity, Jenny McCawley, freshman, 
wraps presents for the Central State 
clients. 



Student Council/99 



% 



STASH THAT TRASH . As an 

annual project Key Clubbers Joenne 
Pope and Susan Brummer clean up 
the banks of the White River across 
from BR. 




CATCH THE SPIRIT , Starting a 
can stack up, Dawn Wells and Lisa 
McEachern lay the ground work for 
the Orange Aid Cerebral Palsy Pepsi 
Drive. 

AFS — Back Row: Tim Pappas, 
Steve Hill, Mimi Gatens, Susannah 
Grimes, Chris Barnhart, Chris 
Meguschar. Front Row: Jenny Foley, 
Helene Riggs, Sarah Harvey, Tara 
Jackson. 




BAGGirfG IT . Picking up trash is 
harder than throwing it down 
discovers J. A. Lacy while cleaning 
up for Key Club. 



100/Service Clubs 



'Servers' benefit BR 




Wandering the halls, the 
new Ripplite desperately 
wished he knew where he 
was headed. Suddenly from 
around the corner came a 
helpful Orange Aid member 
leading a group into the 
Lecture Room to the annual 
Freshman Tea. There was 
also a tea for former 
Shortridge students 
introducing them to their new 
school. Orange Aid also 
sponsored a Pepsi Drive for 
Cerebral Palsy. 

Achieving recognition from 
its school and community, 
Key Club contributed their 
services throughout the year. 
This year Key Clubbers 
cleaned up the banks of the 



FOOD FOR THOUGHT ... As part 
of Key Club Week, each teacher was 
presented with a shiny, ripe apple. 



White River and also 
collected old glasses for 
needy people around the 
world. A bowla-thon, another 
service performed by Key 
Club, raised over $300 for 
Cystic Fibrosis. 

A third club came into light 
at BR during the year. AFS 
(American Field Service) 
hosted foreign students 
visiting the GS. Families 
opened up their homes to the 
students when they passed 
through Indy. Aside from 
hosting exchange students, 
AFS sponsored a booth at the 
Homecoming Festival and 
visited other AFS students 
from around the country. 

Although Pepsi Drives, 
foreign visitors and bowling 
are not usually associated 
with school, the three service 
clubs proved these events 
educational as well as fun. 



^^^V^ '"^B^^ J^^sfl^ '■^l 





KEY CLUB — Back Row: Lisa 
Cooreman, Steve Hill, Mrya Lahman, 
J. A. Lacy, Phil Sharpley, Clars 
Danvold, Brian Bill, Mark Dorsey, 
Tim Johnson, Kirk Brittain, Ann Cox. 
Third Row: Mary Beth Blome, 
Rhonda Goldsberry, Stan Smith, Mimi 
Gatens, Chris Barnhart, Jenny 
Moffatt, Heidi Fledderjohn, Tim 
Pappas, Joenne Pope, Hannah 
Meadows. Second Row: Mr. Dan 
Gallagher, Maya Roth, Heather 
Matthews, Michelle Essenberg, 
Damon Davis, Michelle Brooks, Jeff 
Jackson, Denise Bowling, Susan 
Brummer, Front Row: Tom Knapp, 
Shannon Harvey, Beth Buddenbaum, 
Kelli Little, Jenny Foley, Tara 
Jackson, Anne Danielle, Amy 
Weichert, Sarah Harvey. 





'EYE' WITNESS . Collecting 
glasses for needy families, Joenne 
Pope and Linda Welcher model the 
donations. 



ORANGE AID — Back Row: 
Barnetta Buckner, Adrian 
Cushenberry, Shelly Carter. Liz 
Grimes, Mimi Gatens, Maya Roth, 
Yolanda Boyd. Front Row: Dawn 
Rasdall, Denise Wynn, Caria Stratton. 



Service Clubs/ 101 



ALBCIM 




Changes alter picture 



Classrooms seemed to be 
fuller. Passing through the 
halls became a challenge. A 
noticeable change had 
appeared. There were more 
people this year . . . more 
faces for photographers to 
capture forever on film. 

The increase didn't make 
the photographer's job any 
easier. When he peered 
around a corner, camera in 



hand, there were the usual 
cries of "Wait 'till I fix my 
hair!" The photo bugs always 
devised new, inventive 
schemes to catch people off 
guard, then click the shutter. 
Mo matter how they were 
captured, all the faces were 
part of the big picture which 
gave Ripple the look of a 
winning combination. 




SHUTTERBaCS Creating a 

collage of images. Doug Jones and 
Hunt Waycott pose for the camera 
while Maya Roth and Peggy Calkins 
take another approach 






NEW WAVES Just 'punking 

out" for homecoming festivities. 
Scott Stevens and Alicia Woods 
pause briefly to display their outfits. 



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PEN PAL Scribbling a quick 

message in class. J C Walker takes 
a break in front of the camera. 



102/ Album 



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PSYCHING In the lorkft ruotr. 

before serond half action beijins 
S( oti Steele thinks over iip( oimrx) 
play strategy 



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SENIORS 



•ELIZABETH AASEN "CAROL 
ADAMS *ERIC ADAMS: Horace 
Mann HS (Gary. IN) 1-3; Football 13: 
Wrestling 4; Track 2 3 'MATT 
ALBEAN: OBRC 3; Masque and 
Mime 2; Thespians 3-4; Key Club 1-3, 
President 3, Treasurer 2; French Club 
1-2 



•MARK ALEXANDER •GEORGE 
ANDERSON: National Honor Society 
3-4, Vice President 4; French Club 1- 
4, Vice President 4; Lilly Leadership 
4; Boys State 3; Latin Club 3; 
Golden Singers 4; Swing Choir 4; 
Science Club 4; 

•LAWANNA ANDERSON 'SUSAN 
APPEL: OBRC 3-4; Yearbook 1-4, 
Editor 34: Quill and Scroll 3-4, Vice 
President 3, President 4; Thespian 
Play 34: One Acts 2 3; Ripples 14; 
Thespians 3-4, Vice President 4; 
Masque and Mime 1-4; National 
Honor Society 3-4; NCTE Semi- 
Finalist; 

•ROBERT ARNOLD •ANDREW 
AUSTIN: OBRC 3-4, President 4; 
Golden Singers 2-4; Swing Choir 2-4; 
Madrigals 3; Thespians 3-4: National 
Honor Society 3-4; Musical 2-4; One 
Acts 1-4. Director 3-4; All-Star Cast 3; 
Thespian Play 1-4; Ripples 1-4; 
Legion of Merit 1-4; Clef Club 1-4; 
Masque and Mime 1-4 'SARA 
AVANT 'JACQUELINE ANN 
BAKER: Newspaper 1: Volleyball 2-3 



•ROGER BALL •KIVYA BARLOWE 
•ROUZBEH BEHROOZI: National 
Honor Society 3-4; Spanish Club 3; 
Legion of Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 
1-4 •ANNA BENNETT: National 
Honor Society 3-4; Senior Cabinet; 
French Club 1-4. Secretary 2, 
President 3. Historian 4; German Club 
3-4, Treasurer 3, President 4: Art 
Club 3-4; Concert Club 1; Rippleaires 
2: Golden Singers 3-4; Marion County 
Math Day 2-4; Homecoming Queen 
Candidate 4; Legion of Honor 1-4; 
Legion of Merit 1-4 



•ELKA BENNING 'MARJORIE 
BERRY -GENA BEVERLY: Shortridge 
HS 13 •GEORGE BLACK: Basketball 
14; Football 1-4; Baseball 1; 
Homecoming King Candidate 4; Pep 
Club 14 



V 



104/Seniors 





Grafitti strikes bridge 



1 



TIME: 10:39 P.M. 
PLACE: Riverview Bridge 

Sally Spraypaint stopped 
her car and quickly got out 
before she was noticed. 
Hidden in her coat pocket 
was her trusty can of spray 
paint. She ran to the bridge 
where she studied her earlier 
works of art. Sally was not 
proud of her habit. Yet there 
was a hidden urge inside of 
her, an urge she could not 
control. 

She popped off the top to 
the can allowing the fumes to 
slowly enter her system. The 
feeling of excitement 
surrounded her, causing her 
knees to knock and her 
palms to sweat. It was time. 

As she started to spray, a 



car approached from around 
the bend. Sally ducked up 
into the bushes; and after the 
car passed, she quickly 
finished her work. She then 
exited from the scene of the 
'crime'. 

Grafitti seemed to be a 
growing habit of many 
Ripplites. it was visible not 
only on bridges, but on walls 
and lockers alike. The Monon 
bridge became a popular 
place to hang "temporary 
grafitti", while the stage paint 
room became a testing 
ground for upcoming 
Rembrandts. Although grafitti 
was not a clean habit, 
Ripplites definitely proved 
that it was a habit that 
demanded much creativity. 




•FRANCINE BLACK 'EDWARD 
BLAIME: Band 1-4; Latin Club 4; 
Debate Club 3; Football 4; Pep Band 
1, 3; Jazz Band 3 *JACQGELINE 
BLEDSOE 'MARY BETH BLOME: 
Track 12. 4; Crosscountry 24; 
Masque and Mime 2-4; Thespians 3-4; 
Thespian Play 3; Ripples 1-2, 4; 
Golden Singers 2-4; Swing Choir 3-4; 
Musical 2-4; Legion of Honor 1-4; 
Legion of Merit 1-4; Lettermen's Club 
1-4; Key Club 34 



•DEEDEE BONDS: Messinger 3-4; 
GEA 4; COE 4 *ROCHELLE BOYD: 
Shortridge HS 1-3; National Honor 
Society 3-4, Vice President 4; Pom- 
Pon Corps 1-4; Student Council 
Secretary 3; Band 1-3, Drum 
Majorette 3; Musical 1-3; Senior 
Cabinet; OLAB 4; Junior 
Achievement 4 'PATSY BRISCOE: 
Legion of Honor 1-4; Senior Cabinet; 
Orange Aid 3-4; Concert Band 3-4; 
Marching Band 4; French Club 2-4, 
Secretary 3; Majorette 3; Pep Club 3; 
Booster Club 4 'MARGIE BROWN: 
Pep Club 2-3; GEA 3-4; COE 34; 

♦FELISA BRUCE: RGTC 14; Drill 
Team 3-4; Color Guard 3; FHA 4; 
Junior Achievement 3 'DEANNA 
BORGE 'VALORIE BOSH 'ED 
CARTER: Legion of Honor 1-4; Legion 
of Merit 14; Football 1-4; Track 1-2; 
Lettermen's Club 2-4; Science Club 1- 
2 



Seniors/ 1 05 



r 



•SHELLEY CARTER: OEA M. State 
Vice President 4; Orange Aid 1-4. 
Vice President 3. President 4; Junior 
Cabinet; Senior Cabinet; Student 
CoutkII M; Pom-Pon Corps 1-3; 
Legion of Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 
1-4; Marchir>g Band 13; Newspaper 2 
3; Masque and Mime 2-3; Thespians 
3; Rippies 2; One Acts 3 •ANTHOriY 
CHAPMEN * PAUL CHESHIRE: 
German Club I; Lettermen's Club I; 
Football 12; Soccer I, 4; Intramural 
Basketball 3; Legion of Merit M; 
Legion of Honor 1 *CATHERItiE 
CHIL08 

•THERESA CHUBB: Shortridge HS 1 
3; National HorK>r Society 3-4; 
Sophomore Coururll; French Club 4; 
Math Club 23; AFS 3; Bowling 3; 
Flag Corps 3 "CHERYL COLBERT 
•ALEX COLEMAN: Legion of Honor 
M; Legion of Merit M "LUTHER 
COLLIER 



USA COOREMAN: Golden Singerk 2 
4; Musical 2^; Swing Choir 34; 
Madrigals 4; Ripples 1-3, Director 3; 
Yearixx* 13; Photography Staff 2-3; 
OBRC 3: A^asque and Mime 1-3; 
Thespians 2-3; All-State Choir 34; 
Key Club 2-4, Co-President 34; Junior 
Cabinet: Tennis Team 1-2; French 
Club 1-2. Vice President 2; Paint 
Crew 1 *MARIA CORNNER 
•CONNIE COTTERELL 'BRENDA 
COUNCIL 



•ANN COX: Hoosier Giris State 4; 
Lilly Leadership 4; Cheerieading 1 , 3- 
4; OBRC 3-4. Vice President 4; 
Thespians 3-4; Masque and Mime 14; 
Golden Singers 24; Musical 24; 
Legion of Merit 14; Legion of Honor 
14; National Hor>or Society 34 
•BETH CRABB 'KURT CROSSLAND 
•RICHARD CURRY 



•ADRIAN CU8HENBERRY: 

Homecomirtg King 4; National Honor 
Society 34; Senior Cabir>et; 
SophorTKxe Cabir»et; Legion of AAerit. 
14 •CLARS DANVOLD: NCTE 
Rnalist 4; Brain Game 4; Golden 
Singers 4; Swirtg Choir 4; Musical 4; 
One Acts 24; Ripples 1-4. Director 4; 
Masque arvl Mime 1-3; Legion of 
Honor 14 •JAMES DEFFENDALL: 
Student Council 24; Student 
Advisory Committee 3; Junior 
Cabinet: Sophonrtore Cabinet; All-City 
CoutkII 3; Homecomirjg King 
Candidate 4 •KEVIN DENNIS: Chess 
Club 13: Latin Club 3 



L 



106/Seniors 





SENIORS 



*DERICK DIXON: Reserve Baseball I- 
2: Varsity Baseball 3-4; Lettermen's 
Club 3-4 *MARK DORSEY: National 
Honor Society 3^; Thespians 3-4; 
Masque and Mlnf»e 1-4, President 4; 
One Acts 2A, Director 4; OBRC 34; 
Thespian Play 34; Musical 34; 
Football 1-3; Soccer 4; Legion of 
Honor 14; Legion of Merit 14; 
Honiecoming King Candidate 3; 
Golden Singers 34; Swing Choir 3; 
Ripples 14. Director 4; Letterrr>en'» 
Club 34; 'R.H. DGNCAN *CANDACE 
EDMONSOM: Shortridge HS 1-3; 
Rippleaires 4; Photo Club 4; Student 
Council 4 

•DEMETRiaS EDWARDS 'DONNY 
ELKINS 'DAVID EMGELKING: 
Legion of Honor 14; Yearbook 24; 
Photography Staff 24; OBRC 34; 
Ripples 24; State Speech Rnalist 3; 
Stage Crew 2; Soccer 2, 4; Masque 
and Mime 34 'ANNETTE FAOTECK: 
German Exchange Student 4; Varsity 
Volleyball 4; Key Club 4; German 
Club 4; Track 4; Performing Arts 4; 
Yearbook 4 



•ZEMOPHIA FITZGERALD: Track 2 
3; Lettei-man's Club 34; Legkm of 
Honor 14; Legk>n of Merit 14; 
Orange Aid 14; COE 4; OEA 4; 
Messenger 14 'EDDIE FRANKUN 
♦TAMMY GAINES 'MICHAEL 
QARMANY: Senior Class Vice 
President; Legion of Honor 14; 
Legion of Merit 14; Reserve Track 1; 
Varsity Track 24, Captain 4; Varsity 
Wrestling 24, Captain 4; Varsity 
Cross-Country 4; Latin Club 34; 
Science Club 1-2; Humanities Road 
Show 2-3; Student Council 34; Juntor 
Cabinet; 

•STEPHANIE QRiDER: Flag Corps 1; 
Spanish Club 1-2; Pep Club 1; Legkm 
of Merit 1-2; Varsity Tennis 24; 
Lettermen's Club 4; Student CouikII 
4; Messenger 24 'ELIZABETH 
GRIMES: Thespians >4, President 4, 
State Vice President 4; National 
Honor Society 34; Golf Team 14; 
Orange Aid 1-4, President 4; Senior 
Class Secretary; Newspaper 3-4, 
Editor 4; Girls State 4 'RONALD 
GRIMM 'CRISTY GUTHRIE: 
Volleyball 1; Legion of Merit 1; 
Legkm of Horror 1-4; Ripple 
Awareness 2; Pep Club 2; 

'JACQUELINE HAMMONDS: Legkx* 
of Honor 14; Legion of Merit 14; 
Madrigals 4; Golden Singers 34; 
Musical 3; National Honor Society 4; 
Thespians 4; Thespian Play 24 
'CATHY HANNA: Legion of Merit 1- 
4; Legion of Honor 1-4; Spanish Club 
1-2; Art Salon 2-3; Art Club 2; Photo 
Club 3 •PAULA HARDY: Freshman 
Cabinet; Sophomore Cabinet; Student 
Council 2; Spanish Club 2; Speech 
Team 34; Masque and Mime 1-4; 
OBRC 34; Thespian Play 4; Ripples 
4 'ANNA HARPER: Shortridge HS 1- 
2; Reserve Cheerleading 2. Co- 
Captain 2; Freshman Cheerleading; 



J 



Tl 



Seniors 107 



r 

•ri<!ha 



SENIORS 



:hARD HARRIS 'KEITH 
HENDERSON: Legion of Honor 1; 
Legon Legion of Merit 1, 3-4; Florida 
2; Student Council 3-4; Junior 
Cabinet: Senior Cabinet; Newspaper 
2-4, Sports Editor 4; Latin Club 
President 4; Art Club President 4; 
Homecoming King Candidate 4; 
Spanish Club 2-4; Humanities Student 
Advisory Council 4; Ripples 3-4 
•CHRIS HENSEL "ANDREW HEROD 



•KIMBERLY HIGHSAW: Legion of 
Honor 1-4; Ripplealres 1-4; Messenger 
M; Art Salon M 'ELIZABETH HILL: 
Yearbook 1-4, Editor 3-4; Quill and 
Scroll 24, Vice President 4; National 
Honor Society 2-4; Thespians 3-4; 
Masque and Mime 1-4, Vice President 
3: OBRC 3; Key Club 13; Ripples 1 
4, Danceline 12; Make Up Crew 1-3; 
Legion of Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 
14 'JANISE HILLIARD: Varsity 
Cheerleading 3-4; Reserve 
Cheerleading 2; Freshman 
Cheerleading; COB 4; Student 
Teaching 1-2; 
•ANITA HINDMAN 

•ANDREW HOESMAN 'APRIL 
HORNBACK 'JACQaELINE DENiSE 
HORTON: OEA 3 4; COE 3^4; Pep 
Club 2-3; DECA 3; Art Salon 2; 
Office Aid 3 'LORI HOSECLAW: 
Shortridge HS 1-3; Stage Crew 2-3; 
Honor Roll 1-2; Freshman Cabinet; 
Sophomore Cabinet; Math Club 1-2; 
French Club 1; Newspaper 1-2; 
Tennis 1; Volleyball 1; Legion of 
Honor 4 



•JAMES HUDKINS 'DONNA 
HUGHES: COE 4; National Honor 
Society 4; Shortridge HS 1-3; 
Freshman Cheerleading; Reserve 
Cheerleading: German Club 4 
'CLINTON JACKSON: Basketball I 
4; Lettermen"s Club 2-4; Legion of 
Merit 23 "THERESA JACKSON 



•TIMOTHY JACKSON: Varsity 
Football 3-4; Jazz Band 2-4; Marching 
Band 2-4; Lettermen's Club 3-4; 
Intramural Basketball 4 'MARY 
JAMES: National Honor Society 2-4, 
President 4; Thespians 2-4; Golden 
Singers 3-4; Swing Choir 4; Quill and 
Scroll 3 4; Paint Crew 1-4 'HAROLD 
JAMESON. JR. 'TYRONE 
JARRETT 



J^tf 



' r 



C^ 






108/Seniors 




■^ 



♦TIMOTHY JELKS "MARIE JESSOP 
•CRIS JOHNSON 'DEAN 
JOHNSON: Football 1-4, Captain 4; 
Junior Cabinet; Intramural Basketball 
3-4; DECA 2; Freshnnan Basketball; 
Legion of Honor 2-4; Legion of Merit 
14 



•JOHN JOHNSON •KIMBERLY 
JOHNSON 'C. TIMOTHY 
JOHNSON: Brain Game 2-4; 
Yearbook 1-4, Editor 3-4; Musical 4; 
Thespians 3-4; Ctolden Singers 4; 
Swing Choir 4; Madrigals 4; National 
Honor Society 2-4; Quill and Scroll 2- 
4, President 3; Legion of Honor 1-4; 
Legion of Merit 1-4; Ripples 1-4; 
Soccer 1, 4; Outstanding Sophorriore 
arnl Junior Student; Natiorwil Merit 
Finalist; Spotlight 1-4; Rensselaer 
Medal; Baush and Lomb Award; 10 
Honors Program (France) 
•DENNIS JONES 

♦E. MICHELLE JONES: Pep Club 2-3; 
Orange Aid 4; Junksr Horror Society 
•BOBBY KELLY "KIM KERNER 
•BILL LAMKIN 



•TRACY LAKE: Messenger 1; Typing 
Award 3 •MIKE LAW: Varsity 
Football 2-4; OBRC 3-4; Lilly 
Leadership 4; National Horrar Society 
4; Golden Singers 2-4; Swing Choir 4; 
Musical 2-3; Thespian Play 3-4; 
Varsity Golf 1-2; Ripples 1-2, 4; 
Senior Cabinet; 'NICK LAW: Varsity 
Football 2-4; Captain 4; Freshman 
Football; OBRC 3-4; Golden Singers 2- 
4; Swing Choir 4; Musical 2-3; 
Thespian Play 3; Junior Cabinet; 
Varsity Golf 1-2; Ripples 1-2, 4; 
Student Council 1-2; Lilly Leadership 
4; 'ANYA LAWRENCE 

♦JONDA LAWSON 'MICHAEL 
LAZAR: National Honor Society 3-4; 
Spanish Club 2-4, Treasurer 2, Vice 
President 3-4; Student Council 4; 
Human Relations 4; Legion of Honor 
14 'CEDRIC LINDSAY 'KORMEN 
LOLLA: Pom Pon Corps 1-3; Student 
Council 2; Messenger 1-3; Latin Club 
4; Senior Cabinet; Junior Cabinet 



Seniors/ 109 



r 



•ESTHER MADDEM 'JEFF 
MADDOX •CAROLYM MAHONEY: 

Golden Singers 4; Pom-Pon Corps 3; 
Legion of Hooof 2-3; Legion of Merit 
3: French Club M; Art Club 2-4; 
Honr>ecoming Queen Csrvlidate 4; 
One Acts 4; Ripples 3; Publicity 24; 
M»ke<Jp Crew 2-4; Prop Crew 3-4; 
Art Salon 2 3; Masque and Mime 3-4 
• KIRT MAXEY 



* SHERRY MAXEY: National Honor 
Society 4; Latin Club 3-4, Secretary 
4; Basketball 13: Softball 3; 
Volleyball 1 ; Student Council 4. 
Treasurer 4; Letternien's Club 4; Lilly 
Leadership 4 *ANNAMARIE 
MAXWELL: Legion of Merit 1-4; COE 
4; Art Salon 2-4; DE 2; OEA 3^; 
Messenger 3^ *WILLIAM MAYS: 
Student Council 1-4. Vice President 4; 
Senior Cabinet; Junior Class 
President: Latin Club 2-4, President 4; 
National Hocwr Society 3-4; Science 
Club 12 TANYA McCLENDON 



•FEffTON McKELLER "CHERYL 
McMILLIM 'JENNIFER McNALLY 
•HANS MEYERS: Football 4; . 
Freshman Track; Reserve Track 2-3; 
Intramural Basketball 2-3; 
Homecoming King Candidate 4; 
Lettermen's Club 2-4; Pep Club 1-4 



•CURTIS MICKEL •CRYSTAL 
MILLER: Pep Club 1; Orchestra 1-2; 
Flag Corps 1-2; Legion of Honor 1, 3- 
4; Pom-Pon Corps 3-4, CoOaptain; 4; 
KX. 4; Junior Achievement 1-4; 
Spanish Club 2-3; Marching Band 2-4 
•KENT MILLER: Football 1-4; 
Wrestling 1-3; Track 1-4; Lettermen's 
Club 2-4; Legion of Honor 1-4 
•SANDRA MILLER: Varsity 
Cheerleadir>g 3; Yearbook 1-4, Photo 
Editor 4; Photo Staff 1-4; Thespians 
3-4, Historian 4; Masque and Mime 1 
4; Student Council 1-2; Quill and 
Scroll 3-4; Stage Crew 1-4; Paint 
Chairperson 2-4; Ripples M; Key 
Oub 1-2; Homecoming Queen 
CandkJate 4 

•STAN MILLER: Newspaper 3-4. 
News Editor 4; Photo Staff 1-4; Quill 
and Scroll 3-4; Yearbook 1-4; Soccer 
M; Tennis 3; Lettermans Club 3-4; 
Student Council 4 •LARRY 
MONGER: French Club 1-4, Vice 
PresMent 3, President 4; Legion of 
Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 1-4; 
Student Council 1-4, Treasurer 3; 
Junkx Cabinet; Senior Cabinet Vice 
President; National Achievement 
Rrtalist 4; Boy's State *REGGIE 
MOORE -DAVID MORIARTY: 
Messenger 1; Rocketaires 12; Soccer 
1-2; Stage Crew 24; Legion of Merit 
2-4; Muskral 2^: Golden Singers 3-4; 



L 




110/ Seniors 




SENIORS 



•JANICE MORRIS: Pep Club 1-3; 
Varsity Volley ball 1-2; Legion of 
Honor 1-2. 4; Legion of Merit M; 
PomPon Corps I -4, Captain 4; 
Homecoming Queen Finalist 4; 
Junior Cabinet; Senior Cabinet; 
Student Council 1-2; Lettermen's 
Club 2-4; lOL Vice President 4; Track 
I ; Debate 3; Spanish Club 24; 
Messenger 1-4; Marching Band 1-4 
•CAROLE MOSS 'MICHAEL MURFP: 
Football 1-4; Basketball 14; Baseball 
1-4; Lettermen's Club 3-4; DEC A 4; 
Honr>ecoming King Rnalist 4 
•AriDREW NEFF 

•REQINA NEVILLE: German Club 1, 
3; Legion of Merit 1 ; Varsity 
Volleyball 3; Lettermen's Club 3-4; 
DECA 3-4; Minority Engineering 
Program •VICKY OSBORNE 
•KARYN OVELTON: German Club 2 
4. Secretary 3-4; Messenger 2; Health 
Clinic Messenger 3; OEA PresWent 4 
•TIMOTHY PAYNE 



•MICHAEL PEARSON: Art Sak>n 3; 
rc Leader 'REGINALD PERRY 
•YVETTE PERRY: Nattonal Honor 
Society 3-4, Treasurer 4; Debate Club 
3; Jazz Band 1-3; Marching Band 1-3; 
Legkm of Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 
1-4; Girl's State 3; Homecoming 
Queen Candidate 4; Newspaper 
Feature Editor 4; French Club 1-4; 
Orange Aid 2-3; Library Aid 2-3; Pep 
Club 2; Student Council 3-4 •BOTCH 
PETTY: Basketball M; Baseball 2-4; 
Lettermen's Club 34; Art Club 1-3; 
Homecoming King Rnalist 4 



♦MARY PORTER 'JENNY PRICE: 

Ripples 4; One Acts 2; Masque and 
Mime 1-3; Art Saton 3; Messenger 1 
•CHARLES PRYOR "STAGEY 
RADFORD: Office Messenger 3; Band 
3: COE 1; Science Club 1; Drill Team 
3; ROTC 2-3; Ripples 3 



•DAVID RANDALL 'DAWN 
RASDALL: Legfon of Merit 3; Pom- 
Pon Corps 23; Pep Club 2; Prom 
Decorating Committee 3; 
Homecoming Committee 4; Orange 
Aid 3; Office Aid 1-4; DECA 3; CCC 
4 'WENDELL RAY: Sentor Class 
President; \U Honors 3; National 
Honor Society 2-4; Legion of Honor 1- 
4; Legion of Merit 1-4; Homecoming 
King Candidate 4 "MARTA REDD: 
PomPon Corps 2-3; Student Council 
2; Junk>r Cabinet; National Honor 
Society 4, Secretary 4; Honnecoming 
Queen Candidate 4 



J 



Seniors/ 1 1 1 



r 



SENIORS 



•ERIC REEVES 'VICTOR REID: 

Track 1 ; Legion of Honor 1 4 'KEVIN 
RHEA: Shortridge HS 13; Performing 
Arts 13 'SOSAN RICHARDSON: 
Track 3-4; Intramural Judo 3; Pep 
Club 2 3; Legion of Merit 3; DECA 3 
4; Messer>ger 2-3; Basketball Manager 
3; Art Club 1; Homecoming Queen 
CaryJklate 4 



*AMBER RIDDLE 'MICHELLE RIEF: 

Casey HS (III) 3: Student Council 4 
'HELENE RIGGS Shortridge HS 13 
•DONNA RIPPY: Attucks HS 1; 
Debate Club 2-4. Historian 4; COE 3-4 



'VICKY ROSE: National Honor 
Society 2-4; Spanish Club 2-4, 
Secretary-Treasurer 3; German Club 
3-4; Legion of Hor>or 1-4; Legion of 
Merit 3-4 'LORI ROSEBROCK: 
Golden Singers 3-4; Swing Choir 3-4; 
Madrigals 3-4; Musical 3-4; Paint 
Crew 1-4; Newspaper 3-4, Editor 4; 
Quill and Scroll 3-4; National Honor 
Society 4; Legion of Honor 1-4; 
Legion of Merit 1-4; Ripples 2; 
Softball 3 'WENDY RUMPEL 
'REGINA SANDERS: Art Club 13; 
Lettermans Club 1-4; DECA 3-4; 
ALFE 3-4; Volleyball 24; Basketball 
1-4; Track 1-2; Tennis 2; ACT-SO 3-4; 
Legion of Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 
1-4 




Business Telephone System 'rings' in new year 



Beginning Jan. 4, Broad 
Ripple High School, along 
with the rest of the IPS 
schools, experienced a 
change in equipment and 
service. Asking why the 
change took place, one got 
the response that it was 
"because of economic 
reasons." The school 
system's telephone bills 
continued to rise; so IPS 
chose to switch from Indiana 
Bell to the Business 
Telephone System. Although 
BTS was costly to install, it 
promised great savings on 
phone bills, which would 
allow the system to pay for 
itself in the long run. 

Along with economic 
reasons, BTS provided good 



by its extra features. It was 
run through the Building and 
Grounds department. Because 
of this and the antennae 
provided to all IPS schools, B 
& G could regulate the 
temperature and work as a 
security system as well. If an 
unauthorized person entered 
the building at night, the 
system worked as a "motion 
surveyor." As soon as the 
intruder was detected, B & G 
was notified: then B & G 
notified the p>olice or IPS 
security. 

Another good feature of the 
BTS system was that if all 
outgoing lines were busy and 
a special number was dialed, 
the system would inform the 
caller when a line was free. 



Also, no long distance calls 
could be made unless a 
certain code number was 
used. BTS did depend on 
Indiana Bell for minor 
equipment and for area and 
long distance calling; 
otherwise, BTS was strictly 
independent. 

Like all new equipment, the 
BTS had its flaws. When the 
system was first installed, IPS 
had some difficulty getting it 
to work as it was intended. 
Most of those flaws had been 
fixed and the system was 
getting into full swing by 
spring vacation, it was not 
quite perfect, but the system 
did look promising. 



Vl 



1 12/ Seniors 





1 



'JAMES SCHOCK: National Honor" 
Society 3 4; Band 14; Legion of 
Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 3; 
Outstanding Male Student 1; NCTE 
Semi-Finalist 3; Art Salon 1, 3; State 
Solo and Ensemble Contest 2 
•SHERRY SESSION: Pep Club 1; 
Science Club 1; Spanish Club 1-2; 
Volleyball 1-2; Ripple Awareness 1-2; 
Basketball 1. 4; Lettermen's Club 3-4; 
Orange Aid 14; Messenger 4; Softball 
3; Humanities 34; COE 4; Senior 
Cabinet •BETSY SHACKLEFORD 
•QaiNTON SHARP 



•SARA SHARPE 'PHILIP 
SHARPLEY: Madrigals 34; Swing 
Choir 2-4; Golden Singers 2-4; 
Football 2; Musical 2-4; Ripples 2, 4; 
Stage Crew 4; Rocketaires 1 , 3; Clef 
Club 1-4; Masque and Mime 2-4; 
Legion of Merit 1-4 'DAWN 
SHERIDAN 'GREGORY SHERIFF: 
Lettermen's Club 3-4; Basketball 1-4; 
Baseball 1-4 



•LAORITA SHEILDS: Pom-Pon Corps 
1; Pep Club 1-4; Legion of Merit 1-2; 
Art Salon 1-3; Messenger 1-4; 
Homecoming Queen Finalist 4; FHA 
4 THOMAS SLAUGHTER 'KEITH 
SMILEY: Baseball 14; Football 2; 
Legion of Merit 2; Legion of Honor 1 
•DONNA E. SMITH: Ripples 1-3; 
FHA 1. 3; Key Club 1-2; Track 1; 
Majorettes 12; Band 12; Orange Aid 
1-4; Spanish Club 1-2; Photo Club 4; 
Pep Club 1-4; Junior Cabinet 



•DONNA R. SMITH: National Honor 
Society 3-4; Legion of Honor 1-4; 
Legion of Merit 3; Band 4; Latin Club 
4: Pep Club 1; Homecoming 
Committee 4; Office Aid 1-2 
♦RHONDA SMITH 'STAN SMITH: 
Rocketaires 1-2; Golden Singers 3-4; 
Swing Choir 3-4; Musical 3-4; Art 
Club 2-4; Art Salon 1-4; Masque and 
Mime 3-4; Thespians 34; One Acts 3- 
4; Thespian Play 3; Ripples 24; 
Humanities Road Show 3-4; Key Club 
2-4; Newspaper 3-4 'VIVIAN SMITH: 
Pep Club 1 



•BRETT SOMMERS: Brebeuf 1; 
Tennis 1; Wrestling 1; Soccer 1-4; 
Swing Choir 3-4; Golden Singers 3-4; 
French Club 2-3; Yearbook 2-3; 
Photo Staff 2 4; Key Club 3-4; 
Masque and Mime 34; Musical 3-4; 
Rocketaires 2; Newspaper 23; Clef 
Club 2 3; Art Club 2; Legion of Honor 
2-4; Legion of Merit 2-4; Ripples 2-4 
•OTHAM SPAIN •COURTNEY 
SPODIC 'KATHY STAHL: Chatard 1; 
National Honor Society 3-4; Legion of 
Honor 2-4; Legion of Merit 2-4; 
Messenger 2 4; Art Salon 2 



j 



Seniors/ 113 



\ 



r 



•PAMELA STALLWORTH: National 
Honor Society 3-4; Junior Cabinet; 
Latin Club 3-4; Health Professions 
Center 1-2; Basketball 1; Messenger 4 
•GARY STEELE: Football 24; Golf 3; 
Baseman 3-4; National Honor Society 
3-4; Soccer 4; Senior Cabinet; Stage 
Crew 2-4; Golden Singers 3-4; 
Madrigals 3-4; Swing Choir 3 •SCOTT 
STEELE: Football 1-4; Golf 3; 
National Honor Society 3-4; Stage 
Crew 2-4; Thespians 3-4; Legion of 
Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 1-4 
•SCOTT STEVENS: Thespians 34; 
Legion of Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 
1-4; Golden Singers 4; 

•MARION STEVENSON: Pom Pon 
Corps 1; Honor Roll l-4;Pep Club 1; 
Junior Honor Society; Orange Aid 1-4 
•RONALD STONE: Masque and 
Mime 34; Photo Club 4 'ANGELA 
STOTLER: One Acts 1; Golden 
Singers 2-3; Ripples 1, 3; Masque and 
Mime 1-3; Thespians 2-3; Swing Choir 
2 "TRACEY SWATTS: Legion of 
Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 1-4; Pom- 
Pon Corps 2; Ripples 2-4, Director 3; 
Science Club 1; French Club 2-4; 
Latin Club 4, Art Club 4; Student 
Council 3-4; 



•ALBERTINA TAYLOR: Student 
Council 3-4; Latin Club 4; Art Salon 
2: Messenger 3-4; Tennis 4 *JONE 
TERRELL •WILLIAM TERRY: 
Spanish Club 1-2; Track 1-3; 
Messenger 3-4; Photography 4; Art 
Club 1 •ERNEST THOMPSON 



•KATHY TOLBERT •MANG 
TROONG -MICHAEL TOGGLE 
•BERLYNNE TURNER: Shortridge HS 
13; Rippleaires 4; Photo Club 4; 
Student Council 1-3; Golden Singers 
4; Gospel Choir 14; Performing Arts 
14; Math Club 2 3 



•SHAWN TURNER 'HEIDI VAIL: 

Shortridge HS 1-2; Yearbook 1; 
Newspaper 12; Soccer 2; Performing 
Arts Writing 1-2; Sp>eech Team 2; 
Quill and Scroll 12; Make Up Crew 1 
3 •ANDREA WAGNER 'J-C. 
WALKER: Baseball 1; Masque and 
Mime 2; Thespians 3-4; Legion of 
Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 1-4; Crew 
2-4; State All Star Crew 2-4 



I 



1 14/ Seniors 





SENIORS 




•NORRIS WALKER 'ANGELA 
WARREN 'DONNA WASHINGTON: 

Science Club 1-4; Latin Club 1; 
Legion of Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 
1-4; Lilly Medical Explorer 14; Health 
Professions (CAHS) 24; Intramural 
Bowling 4; American Chemical 
Society Research Program 3-4; Senior 
Cabinet; Orange Aid Big Sister 14; 
Junior Cabinet 'LISA WATSON 






'SHARON WATTS 'JANET WEST: 
Drill Team 2-4 'ALEASHA WHITE ' 
KIM WHITE 



•ERICK WILLIAMS ♦LISA WILLIAMS 
*LORI WILLIAMS: Guidance 
Messenger 1-3; Latin Club 3-4, 
Activities Director 4; Student Council 
3; Homecoming Queen Candidate 4; 
National Honor Society 4; Legion of 
Honor Society 4; Legion of Honor 1-4; 
Legion of Merit 1-4; Science Club 2 
•SHERRY WILLIAMS 



♦PATRICK WISDOM: National Honor 
Society 3-4; Art Club 3-4, Treasurer 

3, President 4; Thespians 3-4; 
Student Council 3-4; Spanish Club 2- 
3; Thespian Play 3; Musical 4; One 
Acts 2, Director 4 "TONDA 
WOODLEY 'ALICIA WOODS: Legion 
of Honor 1-4; Legion of Merit 1-4; 
French Club 3-4; Latin Club 4; 
Student Council 4; Letterman's Club 
14; Orange Aid 1-4 'JESSICA 
WOYNA: Key Club 2 3; Orange Aid 
1-3; Ripples 1; French Club 1-3; 
Cheerleading 1; Masque and Mime 1- 
3; Golden Singers 4; 

•DENISE WYNN: Student Council 1- 

4, President 4; Homecoming Queen 
4; Orange Aid 1-4, Secretary 3. Vice 
President 4; Senior Cabinet; Junior 
Cabinet; Ripples Director 3; Thespian 
Play Crew 2; Legion of Honor 1-4; 
Legion of Merit 1-4; Girl's State 3; 
Spanish Club 13 'DEBORAH 
YOtlNG: PomPon Corps 13; Pep 
Club 1-3; Legion of Merit 1-2; Junior 
Achievement 1-2; Art Salon 1-3; FHA 
4; Messenger 4; Orange Aid 2-3 



J 



Seniors/ 115 



r 



JUNIORS 



Deadly case of 'senioritis' reaps awards 



Toward the end of 
February, the hapless junior 
began to feel out of sorts. His 
mother diagnosed it as mono 
and immediately rushed him 
to the doctor. Overly 
suspicious, his girlfriend 
decided he was cheating on 
her and dumped him. His 
friends thought he was just 
plain weird, and lately even 
his gerbil had begun avoiding 
him. 

He shuffled through the 
school hallways; his books 
became chains that seemingly 
rattled and clinked as he 
dragged himself to class. The 
sanitary green walls began to 
nauseate him more than 
usual. 

School life had lost its 
zesty flavor; now the taste of 
pork fritters haunted him. It 
soon became evident that he 



had been mowed down in 
midlife by an early case of 
"senioritis." At basketball 
games he found himself 
unconciously mouthing the 
letters "AL-a-M-N I" to the 
junior-senior cheer. 
Gnavoidably, the crisis 
erupted one day when he 
barricaded himself in his 
locker so he could miss class. 
Sensing the real tragedy of 
the situation, his classmates 
banded together and 
formulated a plan. As the end 
of the year neared, the school 
held a special awards 
presentation. Slumped in an 
auditorium seat, the listless 
junior was abruptly awakened 
from his comotose state when 
he heard his name repeated 
over and over. To his surprise 
he had been elected ROTC 
captain, yearbook ■ 



newspaper editor, MHS 
president, JHS president, and 
captain of the football, 
wrestling, basketball, track, 
soccer and cross country 
teams for next year. He was 
president, vice-president, 
secretary and treasurer of his 
class. The mayor presented 
him with a key to the city, 
and his girlfriend begged him 
to take her back. 
Unanimously voted the most 
handsome junior boy, he 
received a gold plaque 
engraved "10." 

Dizzy with success and 
loaded down with certificates, 
plaques, and trophies, he 
stumbled about the stage. 
Hundreds of fawning girls 
followed in his wake, and 
deafening applause thundered 
throughout the auditorium. 
As he stepped up to the 



podium, a hushed silence 
hovered over the audience. 
With eyes modestly lowered 
and an appropriatly grateful 
voice, he admitted, "Well, 
maybe I'll stay another year. 



I 



I 




Jeff Able, Demise Adams, Andrea 
Aldridge, Charles Anderson, Timothy 
Anderson, Rene Arnold. Melissa 
Arthur 



Steve Badger. Melissa Baker, Kevin 
Barb>er. Jessica Barker, Chris 
Barnhart, Yolanda Berry, Cheryl 
Bellinger 



Carol Beymer, Melanie Bibbs, Jackie 
Bigsbee, Dennis Bland. Denise 
Bowling, Rita Boyd, Wilbur Braxton 



Shetone Briggs, Kirk Brittain, 
Michelle Brooks, Shannon Brooks, 
Damon Brown, Dave Brown, Geary 
Brown 



Tim Brown Reedlyn Bryant, John 
Burkley. Lynda Calbert, Peggy 
Calkins. Bobby Campbell, Aloric 
Carson 



L 




1 16/ Juniors 




^^^ ^^^ ^^^ i ^ ^ — 



::i 



Ceil Chanin, Helen Childs, Lily Chin, 
Donald Clark, Judy Clemmons, Beryl 
Cohen, Kern Colbert 




Tina Collins, Kathy Coleman, James 
Compton, William Coojjer, Zachery 
Cooper, Dawn Cooreman, Mike 
Corlett 



Dianne Costello, Carrie Crawford, 
Richard Creveling, Terrence 
Crumpton, Steve Cunningham, Paul 
Curtis, Anne Danielle 



Clinton Davis, Gerard Davis, Hank 
Davis, J.B. Davis, James Day, Yvette 
Deberry, Karen Doty 



April Dozier, Denise Dubard, Ivan 
Duncan, Tina Edmonds, Stacey 
Edwards, John Finchum, Kelley 
Fisher 



Troy Fitts, Bruce Fitzgerald, Eric 
Flemming, Kim Floyd, Paula Foster, 
Candi Ford, Paul Galloway 



Ronetta Cant, Frederick Garrett, 
Alfred Gartin, Mimi Gatens, Brian 
George, Linda Gibson, Steve Glunt 



David Goldsberry, Mac Goode, Debra 
Graham, Doyce Graham, Terrance 
Gray, Tracey Gray, Roger Green 



Erica Guthrie, Anthony Hamilton, 
Joseph Hampton, Kelli Harper, Earl 
Harris, Teri Harrison, Shannon 
Harvey 



J 



Juniors/ 1 17 



r 



Gary Hatcher, Anitra Hayden, Adrian 
Henderson, Mark Henderson, Cynthia 
Henry, Cara HIghsaw, Michael Himes 



Warren Hollins. Melanie Hubbard, Rob 
Hubbard, Gretchen Irmiger, Tara 
Jackson, Teresa Jackson, Frank 
Jerasa 



Bill Jenson. Arlene Johnson, Ivan 
Johnson, Kristi Johnson, Shona 
Johnson, Steve Johnson, Tammy 
Johnson 



Bobbie Jones, Doug Jones, Michael 
Jones, Courtney King, Allen Kimsey, 
Kevin Kennedy, Tom Knapp 



IHikki Knox, Karl Krause, J. A. Lacy, 
Laura Lacy, Mary Lahman, Mark 
Landers, David Latimore 



Darren Lee, Meiinda Leflore, Lisa 
Leforge, Russell Lewis, John Ligon, 
Dianne Link, Lisa Lockwood 



Mary Beth Lona. Cheryl Looper, 
Jenny Love, Leslie Loy, Sean 
Maddox, Kimberly Martin, Monica 
Martin 



Heather Matthews, Denise Mayfield, 
Lisa McEacherm. Jerome McGee, 
Darlene McKinnie, Hannah Meadows, 
Doug Miller 



Elaine Miller, Ted Miller, Felecia 
Mills, Jenny Moffatt, Karen Molzan, 
Marceia Moon, Phillip Morgan 



'^ 




1 18/ Juniors 



JUNIORS 







Darrell Morton, Terry Moss, Laura 
Mouser, Tonya Moy, Dung Mguyen 
Mary Nowlin, Melzena Odom 



Sean Okey, George Overstreet, Kevin 
Overstreet, Louis Owsley, Tim 
Pappas, Michael Pate. Deanne 
Patterson 



Arnold Patton, April Payne, Tom 
Peeler, Kenny Pike, Victoria Polk, 
Bryant Porter, Stephanie Powe 



Ken Pullen, Pierre Pullins, Glenn 
Rachel, Paul Ramsey, Jerry Rasdell, 
Latonia Ray, John Reed 



Michael Reeves, Angela Reid, Devita 
Reller, Ben Reynolds, Cordia 
Richardson, Lee Richardson, Larry 
Roberts 



Sherwood Robinson, Patty Rodgers, 
Lana Rose, Byron Ross, Mike Rugh, 
Linda Rush, Cecil Russell 



Snoozing students survive midnight movies 



And now . . . another 
episode fronn' the datefile of 
Fred and Fanny, America's 
favorite teenage couple. 

It's 11:30 Friday night. 
Fanny has just completed a 
long, tedious homework 
assignment. Looking forward 
to a peaceful rest, she 
prepares for bed, then slips 
between the covers into a 
much-awaited sleep. The 
phone rings. Drowsily she 
answers "Hello? Fanny? This 
is Fred how about going to a 
movie?" 

"Sure," she mumbles. 



assuming he means the 
Saturday morning matinee. 

"Great!" he says, I'll pick 
you up in five minutes." At 
midnight Fred and a dosing 
Fanny arrive at the theater. 
They are just in time to see 
. . . The Midnight Movie. 
Inside, Fred pays the $3 
admission while Fanny rests 
against the candy counter in 
the way of a drooling fat man 
who is trying to locate a box 
of Goobers. 

Fred and Fanny find seats 
just in time to miss the 
instrumental version of the 



song, "Baby It's Cold 
Outside." The show begins. A 
loud cheer rises from the 
crowd as the title Dawn of 
the Dead flashes across the 
screen. Fanny, a bit grouchy, 
exclaims, "Oh, no! Not the 
movie where they eat people 
alive!" then falls asleep in her 
popcorn. 

Suddenly, she is awakened 
by a loud, raucous 
horselaugh; it is the fat man 
who is rapidly stuffing 
Goobers in his mouth while 
laughing at the movie. Fanny, 
now thoroughly disgusted. 



and Fred, who accidently 
spills his Coke on a certain 
fat man eating Goobers, leave 
Dawn of the Dead and move 
to the next door screen where 
Endless Love is playing. 

Fred comments that it's a 
good thing they play two 
different shows and settles 
down to watch. Fanny, 
settling down to sleep, says 
"Good Morning." 



J 



Juniors/ 1 19 



] 




JUNIORS 



Dee Dee Saluppo, Ron Sanders, 
Tammy Sanders, Tangela Sanders, 
Chris Sanner, Terry Scates, Karen 
Schuder 



Amy Senior, Bruce Sharpe, Lisa 
Shepherd, Janet Sherrell, Andrea 
Shields, Hal Shipley, Andrew Smith 



Diedra Smith, James Smith, Marilyn 
Smith, Mick Snobarass, Todd Snyder, 
Bridget Steen, Kevin Stevens 



Deanna Stevenson, Veronica Stone, 
Stephanie Stout, Antonio Strong, 
Susie Talbott, Dennis Tate, Mary 
Taylor 



Rhonda Thurman, Maria Todd, 
Derrick Toran, Dale Tucker, Nathan 
Tuggles, Danny Turner, Valerie 
Turner 



Jackie Vandever, Rodney VanHorn, 
Keith Vinson, Kevin Vinson, Charmel 
Warren. Angela Wats, Harry Watts 



Hunt Waycott, Lori Webb, Mark 
Webster, Brian Welcher, Eric Wells. 
Melissa Wells, Caron Whitfield 



Brian Williams, Caria Williams, 
Charita Williams, Cherita Williams, 
Marselle Williams, Mike Williams, 
Shelly Wills 



Amy Winkler, John Winn, Jeff Wise, 
Chris Wood. Sherry Wright, Steven 
Yelloday, Emily Young 



L 




120/ Juniors 



SOPHOMORES 




1 



Julie Adams, Marvella Alexander, 
Yolanda Allen, Kelley Anderson, 
LaShaun Archie, Teresa Armstrong, 
Steve Arnold 



Scott Ashley, Yanita Austin, Karen 
Bailey, Valerie Bankhead, Roxanne 
Bartlett, Kenneth Beatty, Michelle 
Bennett 



Denise Benning, Vincent Bibbs, Jenni 
Bigham, Brian Bill, Willie Blackwell, 
Merle Blakely, Michelle Bledsoe 



Sheila Bledsoe, Jeff Blomberg, Beth 
Bornstein, Lorenzo Boswell, Michael 
Bowling, Yolanda Boyd, Kevin 
Branham 



Keith Brittain, Keewanna Brooks, 
Maria Brown, Roosevelt Brown, 
Susan Brummer, Dewayne Bryant, 
Monica Bryant 



Cindy Bubenzer, Barnetta Buckner, 
Scott Callahan, William Carson, 
Kalvin Carter, Mike Carter, Craig 
Cartwright 



Tyrone Cartwright, Tony Caudle, 
David Chambers, Dennis Chambers, 
Lisa Cheatham, Elaine Chenault, 
Danny Chubb 



Greg Clack, Charles Cobb, Karen 
Coleman, Shanna Coleman, Sharon 
Collins, Clarence Cornelius, Troy 
Crayton 



Terrance Croom, Alfred Dartis, Eon 
Davis, Patrick Davis, Thor Davis, 
Kenneth Dixon, Geraldine Dobbins 



J 



Sophomores/ 1 2 1 



r 



SOPHOMORES 



Cathy Dudgeon, Tanya Dullen, 
Lonnie Duncan, Tina Duncan, Shelly 
Dunning, Jim Durrett, Eric Dycus 



David Edmonds, Nila Edwards, 
Sharon Elkins, Michelle Essenberg, 
William Essex, Kelly Evans, Sheara 
Faucett 



Charles Feltner, Darlene Fendley, 
Tony Finnell, Heidi Fledderjohn, Kim 
Fleming, Helen Foster, Pam Fout 



Pam Fox, Gary Fracton, Karen 
Franklin, John Frierson, Naomi 
Frizzle, Michael Gant, Katharine 
Garey 



Michael Garrett, Octavia Garrett, 
Victor Garrett, Roger Gleason, Susan 
Glunt, Rhonda Goldsberry, Richard 
Goodnight 



Leslie Grady, Matthew Graham, 
Patricia Graham, Maureen Graves, 
Felicia Gray, Jon Gray, Raymond 
Gray 



Leona Green, Jon Griffith, Angela 
Hamilton, Ronald Hamilton, Jackie 
Hamiter, Don Harris, Drena Harris 




I 



Snow daze produce 


a flurry of activities 




During January and 


liked to shut off his alarnn. 


enjoyed staying home and 


though obviously 


February BR students 


sleep to noon, and watch 


doing homework he had 


disappointed they had 


faced deep snow, sub-zero 


TV. For the most active 


forgotten to do the night 


missed a day of school, 


temperatures and killer ice. 


Ripplite, "Suicide Hill" 


before. Others who enjoyed 


found ways to entertain 


At tinnes the weather was 


p>osed an adequate threat. 


less brain-straining activity 


themselves. In the end, 


so bad schools were 


He could ski down it — or 


went down to an arcade 


even those who were 


closed. This presented a 


just fall down it. Anyway 


and spent the entire day 


injured on Suicide Hill were 


dilemna for Ripple 


you looked at it, broken 


and all their money 


thankful for a day off 


students: What to do on a 


bones were guaranteed. 


wreaking havoc on alien 


school. 


snow day? 


Certainly the more 


ships, and lasar bases. 




The average student 


conscientious student 


Hundreds of Ripplites, 





i: 



1 22/ Sophomores 




■^ 



Jody Harris, Tammy Harris, Denise 
Harrison, Sheila Harvey,. Richard 
Hasler, Melynda Hart, Bessie Hawkins 



Anthony Hayden, Janice Hayes, 
Sylvia Hayworth, Richard Hazel, Tina 
Hill, Tracy Hill, Byron Hoesman 



Crystal Holland, David Horsewood, 
Terri Hoseclaw, Derek House, Lois 
Hudgens, David Hudson, Tony Hurt 



Denise Huse, Frankie Isom, Carmen 
Jackson, Jeff Jackson, Debra 
Jacobs, Lori Jacobs, Dennis 
Jefferson 



William Jelks, Alien Johnson, Mike 
Johnson, Ray Johnson, Reginald 
Johnson, Yvette Johnson, Caria 
Jones 



Kandra Jones, Kerry Jones, Rodney 
Jones, Steve Jones, Terry Jones, 
Theodore Jones, John Keith 



William Kidd, Laurel Klapper, Darrell 
Knapp, Andrea Knox, William Kurtz, 
Tiffany Lach, Richard Lake 



Kim Latimore, Elizabeth Laughlin, 
Andrea Lee, William Lenoir, Benita 
Lewis, Leon Lewis, Stacey Long 



Fred Lumpkins, Kenneth Lumpkins, 
Kevin Madden, Reginald Majors. 
Violeta Manawat, Henry Marks, 
Donna Martin 



J 



Sophomores/ 1 23 



r 



William Martin, Mauri Mason, Kim 
McBrady, Janice McClury, Sandra 
McCrackin. Debra McCraw, Ben 
McCurty 



Jeffrey McGhee, Ben Meadows, 
Roxanne Means. Robert Medaris, 
Mark Mendel. Eva Miles. Rosemary 
Miles 



Robert Miller, Suzanna Mitchell, Kara 
Moynahan, Thurmond Montgomery, 
Debbie Moore, Lentina Moore, 
Lavonne Morrow 



Leonard Mosley. Canda Moy, Ella 
Moye, Trevor Murray, Darrion 
Murphy, William Myers, Netra 
Nichols 



Jonathon Nicholson, Chris Noel, 
Darryl O'Kelley, Lisa Osborn. Patrice 
Osborne, Jackie Parks, Dan Patterson 



Kim Paugh. Thomas Peeler. John 
Peters, Joe Petry, Richard Petty, 
Clint Poole, Joenne Pope 



Lynn Porter. Corrina Powell, Danny 
Powell, Nick Price, Elmer Quarles. 
Michelle Quarles, Joshua Rabin 



Milton Ray, Travis Reed, Phil 
Reehling, Amy Rees, Noreita Reid, 
Glenda Richardson, David Roberts 



Shirley Robinson, Beverly Roche. 
Sally Roettger, Sarah Rolle, Ellis 
Rose, Maya Roth, Leslie Roush 



I 




1 24/ Sophomores 



r 



SOPHOMORES 




Alarm clock sabotages Ripple student's sleep 



The beautiful spy hung 
up her phone. "Le Gosi 
sent men to Zurich — to 
kill you," she said. 

Darling, they won't kill 
me." I wiped her tears 
away with my 
handkerchief. "I'm meeting 
a man at the casino." 

I strolled to the open 
elevator. Two men waited. 
The doors slid shut. 

Suddenly, one of the 
men drew a gun and said, 

"Good-bye, Mr. ." 

My elbow came in contact 
with the emergency stop. 
He reeled off balance and 



squeezed the trigger. I 
grabbed his arm and threw 
it against the wall of the 
shaft. I re-pressed the 
emergency button. The 
doors shut on his arm, and 
the elevator shot 
downward. 

I turned and sent a blow 
to the other man's neck, 
knocking him unconscious. 
The doors opened and the 
first man was back 
inaction. We traded 
punches in a desperate 
struggle. 

The doors swung open 
and the car stopped 



throwing me off balance. 
He shoved my head 
through the doorway. I was 
about to be decapitated! 

My foot kicked the 
emergency stop and the 
doors released their grip on 
me. I grabbed the man and 
shoved him off the 
elevator. He fell and 
disappeared down the 
shaft. 

I took the remaining 
man's gun and shoved it 
into his mouth. "How 
many men are out there? 
"Two. By your car." 
I dashed out to the 



parking lot. My gun spoke 
twice. The men guarding 
my car fell. I climbed into 
my Ferrari and shoved the 
keys into the ignition. A 
bomb! Wired to the 
ignition! I grabbed the wire 
cutters from my glove 
compartment and cut the 
wires connected to the 
bomb. Two seconds. Red, 
blue . . . 

The exploding buzz of 
my alarm clock awakened 
me. Another day at Broad 
Ripple High School lay 
ahead. 




Keenen Royle, Alesia Saulsberry, 
Mary Saulsberry, Dana Scisney, Nia 
Settles, Sharon Sharp, Sheila Sharp 



Kelly Shaw, Eric Shepherd, Michael 
Sherman, Johnetta Shotwell, Susan 
Showalter, Tracy Sides, Alfonzo 
Simpson 



Karen Sims, Stephanie Skinner, Mike 
Small, Bryan Smith, Curtis Smith. 
Elicia Smith, John Smith 



Larhonda Smith, Margie Smith, 
Michele Smith, Sharon Smith, 
Thomas Spine, Troy Stevenson, Kim 
Stewart 



Cynthia Tate, Chris Taylor, Marsha 
Taylor, Sandra Taylor, Thomas 
Taylor, Tonia Teeters, Ronald Terrell 



Katrina Terry, Amy Thomas, Charles 
Thomas, Tonya Tiggs, Robert 
Tolbert, Marea Toles, IDonna 
Tompkins 



J 



Sophomores/ 125 



r 



SOPHOMORES 



Barbara Trammer, Renee Tucker, 
Lisa Toggles, Mikell Turner, Patricia 
Ursino, Kelly Vale, Lorine Van Dyke, 



Rodney Van Horn. Linda Viar. Sonya 
Wagner. Eric Walker, Mark Walker, 
Renee Walker, Mosi Wallace 



Christopher Walton, Ken Walton, 
Ramona Warfield, Rageing Warr, 
Charles Washington, Kenneth 
Washington, Amy Weichert 



Deborah Wehr. Dawn Wells. Derrick 
Wells. Theresa West. Tracy Whitaker. 
Derek Whitehouse. Betsi Wiley 



Caria Williams. India Williams. 
Lawrence Williams, Obbie Williams, 
Neal Williamson, Beth Wilson. James 
Wilson 



Kelly Wilson. Gregory Woods. Indria 
Woods. Billy Woodson. Maria Wright. 
John Yates. Leon Yau 



Richard Yelle. Melanie Young 




Ripple student's time and 



Money may not be 
everything, but most 
Ripplites found that it was 
a handy commodity to 
have. Every student spent 
a buck here or there, blew 
a $20 bill once in a while 
or simply nickle and dimed 
it away. For those 
students, a job was a 
necessity. 

Each student had his 



own special reason for 
having a part-time job. 

Entertainment and 
clothes gobbled a great 
deal of the green stuff. 
One student explained, "I 
used it for entertainment, 
such as movies and 
records." More sports- 
minded students said, "I 
use my paycheck to buy 
skiing equipment," and, "I 



money well-spent 

used it for my trip to the 
Super Bowl." 

A conscientious Ripplite 
stated, "I put half of my 
money in the bank, and 
the other half is used for 
essentials and spending 

money." 

Another explained, "I 
work so I can save money 
for college. All my money 
goes into a savings 



account." 

More and more Ripplites 
moved into the work field. 
Some regarded it as good 
experience for jobs later on 
in life. 

Others only saved their 
money as far ahead as 
Saturday night. 



^ 



126/ Sophomores 



FROSH 



~1 



Fearful freshman fights first-day frustrations 




The building was 
overwhelming and the 
thought of my first day at 
Broad Ripple made my knees 
shake. I must have stood 
outside staring at the 
towering building for five 
minutes, when I finally 
collected my courage and 
went inside. 

Upon entering the school I 
tried to find my second-floor 
locker, and not knowing that 
there were two separate 
second floors got lost three 
times. Flushed and frustrated. 



I finally had to ask for 
directions. I must have had 
"Freshman" written all over 
me because I was sold two 
elevator passes on my way to 
my locker. 

I was never rhythmically 
inclined and should have 
known better than to give 
into one of my friends and do 
the Broad Ripple chant at a 
basketball game. I found a 
sure way to attract attention 
— just get the rhythm mixed 
up and shout "BROAD 
RIPPLE" five beats ahead of 



the music. 

I learned a lot my freshman 
year, like the easiest way to 
get out of school under the 
influence of a Big Mac attack 
and the best excuse for being 
late to class. I gradually 
began to fit in and didn't feel 
quite so much an object of 
ridicule. Every so often, 
though I felt a twinge of 
immaturity lurking in my 
depths, but I was suddenly 
brought back to reality by 
some mature upperclassman 
yelling, "FRESHMAN!" 




Lisa Abel, Ron Abel, Sabrina 
Alexander, Donna Allen, Sheila Allen, 
LaDonna Anderson, Tomika 
Anderson 



Rachel Arnold, Yvette Atkins, Tinn 
Aurs, Cindy Baker, James Barrow, 
Jeff Basile, Williann Baxter 



Tammy Beaupain, Paristoo Behroozi, 
James Betry, Lionel Bey, Foriest 
Bigbee, Lee Blacky, Liz Black 



Kimberly Bluitt, Tracey Bolen, Jerry 
Bond, David Bowe, Nancy Bowman, 
Derrick Bradley, Wendy Braswell 



Willie Brewer, Bridget Bridgeforth, 
Kathy Browder, Kim Brown, Tony 
Brown, Michael Brunson, Beth 
Buddenbaum 



Kim Bullock, Jennifer Burkley, Susan 
Burns, Rodara Bury, Eric Butler, 
Stacey Butler, Michelle Calbert 



J 



Freshmen/ 127 



c. 



FROSH 



Angela Calbert, Shelly Cannon, David 
Carter. Jeff Cauldwell, Lisa 
Cheatham, Shelly Chassell, Angela 
Chisolm 



James Chisolm, Kim Clay, Celia 
Cline, Tyrone Cole, Lorraine 
Coleman, Tony Cork, John Corn well 



Tamra Covington, Brenda Covington, 
Elizabeth Cox, Rachelle Cox, Rhonda 
Cox, Cynthia Crawford, Johnathon 
Crisp 



Connie Cross, John Curtis, Evelyn 
Davis, Karen Davis, Kleth Davis, 
Emily Dawson, David Day 



Martisha Day, Hanelon Dedeax, 
Lashall Deloney, Chris Dennis, Kim 
Dennison, Johnny DeWalt, Joanie 
Dial 



Dianna Diekmann, Henry Doge, Mike 
Dooly. Derick Duncan, Lonnie 
Duncan, Madelena Duncan, Robin 
Dunn 




A quarter a day keeps space invaders away 

Ahead in the distance Only a quick pull on the one-fourth tank left. distance. 



Ahead in the distance 
loomed a rocky cliff. 
Suddenly, a bright red light 
appeared from a crevice in 
the side of the cliff. As I 
looked up, I was rudely 
awakened by the sight of a 
large missile on a collision 
course with my ship. 

Evasive action was 
necessary. I focused my heat 
seeking scanners on the 
rapidly approaching 
projective, locked in on the 
target. 3 . . . 2 . . . 1 ... I 
fired. To my surprise the 
missile kept coming. 



Only a quick pull on the 
joystick saved me from total 
obliteration. I could now 
concentrate on my mission 
— to seek out and destroy 
the enemy base. 

As I continued deeper into 
enemy territory, a squadron 
of enemy fighters intercepted. 
I relentlessly punched the fire 
button and systematically 
vaporized them. 

My confidence was building 
and the adrenalin was 
beginning to flow. I glanced 
at my fuel gauge and, to my 
dismay, discovered I had only 



one-fourth tank left. 
Fortunately I spied three fuel 
tanks up ahead and quickly 
used my matter transferrer 
unit to move the fuel to my 
ship. 

Whew! That was close! 

As I glanced up, I was 
greeted by a barrage of 
fireballs careening toward me. 
I lowered my ship toward the 
ground and skimmed along, 
letting the fireballs pass 
harmlessly overhead. As the 
final fireball whooshed past 
my tail section, I saw the 
enemy colony looming in the 



distance. 

placed my index finger on 
the fire button and took aim. 
Just then an unseen missile 
seared through my craft. All 
was lost! I had failed in my 
mission. 

I reached into my pocket 
and to my dismay, found it 
empty. "Oh, well," I said as I 
strolled from the arcade, 
"When 1 get my next 
paycheck, I'll be ready to 
destroy that base!" 



TC 



128/ Freshmen 




■^ 



Patrick Dye, Richard Edmondson, 
Blanche Edwards. Bobbie Eldridge, 
Amy Essenberg, James Evans, 
Tracey Evans 



Geraldine Eversole, Terry Feeney, 
Jeff Feltner, Darlene Fendley, Alison 
Fenstermaker, Annette Fields, 
Kenneth Floyd 



Jennifer Foley, Price Fugate, Steve 
Galloway, Michelle Gardner. Eric 
Garmany, Robert George, Becky 
Gibson 



Caria Gilbert, Paula Gill, Terrieann 
Gleason, Steve Godfrey, Linda 
Gogulis, Michael Golf, William Goach 



William Goodlow, Robert Goodner, 
Yolanda Grady. Patricia Graham. 
William Graham, Dan Green. Tamara 
Green 



Susannah Grimes, Clint Grubbs, 
Ronald Hamilton, Benson Hardy, 
Karen Harris. Kevin Harris, Warner 
Harris 



Lisa Harvey. Sarah Harvey. David 
Hatcher, Stanley Hatton, Bhyron 
Henderson, Regina Henderson, Mary 
Henn 



Yolanda Huggins, Steve Hill, Tammy 
Hill. Demetris Hood. Melissa Hood, 
Steven Hooks, Theresa Hopson 



Lois Hudgens, Kelly Huffman, 
Samantha Huffman, Charles Hughes, 
Eileen Hughes, Margaret Hughes, 
James Hurt 



J 



Freshmen/ 129 



w^w 



r 



Robert Hutchison, John Ireland, 
Leslie Jackson, Michelle Jackson, 
Arlene Jefferson, Keith Jefferson, 
Kevin Johnson 



Kim Johnson, Kurt Johnson, Terry 
Johnson, Esther Jones, Jeff Jones, 
Leia Jones, Patrick Jones 



Jeffrey Jordan, Jennifer Jordan, 
Yolanda Jordan. Amy Kassenbrock, 
John Kelley, Kim Kendrick, Sherri 
King 



Mark Lacy, Cathy Lambert, Harem 
Lee, Ronald Lee, Richard Levi, Terry 
Level, James Lewis 



Jeffery Lilly, Helenor Lindsay, Leroy 
Lindsay, Kelli Little, John Logan, 
Laura Long, Lucy Loos 



Kim Lowe, Mary Luttrell, Sabrina 
Lutz, Mathew Lyman, John Lynch, 
David Madden, Jeffrey Madden 



Caria Martin, Kelly Martin, April 
McCanns, Jennifer McCawley, 
Charlotta McDaniels, Denise McCray, 
Charles McDowell 



Stephen McDowell, Kevin McGill, 
Tony McGlan, Jermas McMeal, 
Michael McPhail. Michael McVey. 
Christopher Meguschar 



Charles Merriweather, Shamona 
Middbrooks. John Miles, Debby 
Milgate. Keith Miller, Mark Miller, 
Shawndra Miller 



I 




P 



L 



130/ Freshmen 



FROSFt 



>L 



Paint and brush helps Mary Kay tame beast 



With base, blush, brush, 
liner, and shadow all arranged 
neatly upon her dresser, Mary 
Kay Maybelline prepares for 
the miraculous transformation 
that will change the beast 
into the beauty. 

Achieving her goal, she 
gingerly brushes her golden 
hair so not to pull one 
precious bleached strand from 
her head. With every hair in 
place . . . just right — oops! 
Hair number 48 is a bit too 
far to the right — she hops 
into the carpool and is on her 
way to Broad Ripple. 



She has 10 minutes until 
the warning bell; so she takes 
out her brush. She spends the 
two minutes she has left after 
her thorough brushing talking 
to her friends. 

After the bell rings, she 
makes a quick stop at her 
locker to pick up a few books 
and to check for lint on her 
eyelashes in one of many 
mirrors stashed in her locker. 

With a confident smile, she 
enters the classroom; and 
with a blink of her baby 
blues, she descends into her 
chair. 



The teacher enters, quiets 
the class, and begins his 
lecture on indeginous 
population. 

In the back of the room, 
Mary Kay sits . . . base. 



blush, brush, liner, and 
shadow arranged neatly 
before her. It's touch-up time. 



*- 


4 


£1 






-/ 


Mk 


1 


1^ 


l^t^. 




1 


4 




1 


i 


^^^^H 




^ 


SJUHHI 




James Minks, Leonard Nelson, 
Michael Nelson, Regina Neville, 
James Northington, Wendy 
Northington, Colleen O'Hara 



Kent Overstreet, Anthony Owens, 
Auldrey Owens, Robert Parker, Staria 
Parks, Robert Parrish, Lisa Parsons 



Erin Patterson, Joanie Patterson, 
Raemina Penick, Angela Peters, 
Angela Pettrie, Sanra Pettrie, Steve 
Perkins 



Orlando Perry, Stephanie Perry, Jerry 
Pickering, Benny Porter, Shellie 
Porter, Eric Posey. Tina Price 



Lawrence Randolph, William Reaves, 
Michael Reid, James Reives. Pamela 
Resnover, Sylvia Reynolds, Michael 
Rhea 



Ronald Riffel, Jamie Rigpath, Jetona 
Robinson, Shana Robinson, Shunte 
Sanders, Michelle Sanner, Mary 
Schurtz 



J 



Freshmen/ 131 



r 



FROSH 



Giovanni Scruggs, Jeff Sherels, 
Jennifer Shoup. Steve Sides. Denise 
Siuder, Kelly Slack, Aaron Smith 



Deann Smith, Gregory Smith, William 
Smith. Nadine Spears, Sherri Spivey, 
Steve Staten. Goldie Steen 



Sherman Stevens, Lisa Stewart, 
Shannon Stewart, James Stokes. Earl 
Stubbs, Deana Tarver, Myra Tate 



Darryl Taylor, Willie Taylor. Melvin 
Teague. Latonya Thomas. Patricia 
Thomas, Robert Thomas, Tyrone 
Thomas 



Clem Tiggs, Tauscha Tobey, 
Celestine Toles. Dana Toles. Patty 
Towe. David Traugott, Mark 
Trottman 



Greg Turner, Natalie Turner. Yvette 
Tyler. Charles Tyson. Ansley 
Valentine. Jay Vahle, Rebecca Vail 



Kris Voelker. James Wadlington, 
Cherri Walker. Med Walker. Marcus 
Ward. Beneva Washington. Janice 
Washington 



Lonnie Washington, Linda Welcher, 
Kevin Wells, George Whitfield. 
Antrawn Wilburn, Linda Williams. 
Fred Wilson 



Mark Wolfe. Tom Woodall, David 
Wright, Walter Wynn, Doretha 
Yelladay, Sherri Ziffrin. Tom Ziffrin 



l 




132/ Freshmen 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACOLTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 



Faculty/ 133 



RIDDLING READOUTS Buried in 

schedule readouts, Mr. Hank Easter, 
vice principal, deciphers students 
academic programs. 



CHECK POINT Trying to keep 

the halls clear, Mr. Donald Glenn, 
principal, stops students to check 
their pass. 




1 34/ Administration 



Administrators become quick-escape artists 



Dashing between and 
around students and teachers, 
I raced through the school 
blindly. This was my big 
chance to prove myself as a 
reporter. My mission: to 
interview an administrator. 

Probing the hails, i spotted 
one 100 feet ahead. 
Trampling innocent strangers 
and former friends in my 
path, I finally reached the 
spot . . . but the 
administrator had suddenly 
vanished. Undaunted, I 
searched on. 

As I walked through the 
office, a glimmer of light 
under Mrs. Dearing's door 
caught my eye. My heartbeat 
quickened at the big chance. 
I opened the door just a 
crack. What should appear 
before my eyes but 20 



students violently thrusting 
their class schedules toward 
Mrs. Dearing. I decided not to 
brave the angry crowd. I 
would have to try my luck 
elsewhere. 

When I passed Mr. Easter's 
office door, I heard a noise; 
but when I glanced in, all I 
saw were piles and piles of 
computer readouts. Mr. 
Easter was nowhere to be 
found! Thinking I had to 
come upon him sooner or 
later, I searched through 
them. I never did. 

The next stop on my 
rounds was Mr. Gallagher's 
office. From outside I could 
hear the static of his walkie- 
talkie; so I moved on to Mrs. 
Loyd's door. She too was 
engaging in a conversation 
over her communication 



device . . . with Mr. 
Gallagher! 

As I rounded the corner on 
my way out of the office, I 
ran head-on into Mr. Curlin. I 
had him trapped and he 
wasn't going to get away 
now! 1 asked him if I could 
interview him for an article 
on the administration, but he 
mumbled something about 
my needing to talk to Mr. 
Glenn and fled back into the 
hallway. 

I knew I would not catch 
him there; so 1 went to track 
down Mr. Glenn. When I 
finally spied him, he was 
walking quickly down the 
hall. I asked him if he had 
time to answer some 
questions. He stopped dead in 
his tracks. Expecting him to 
start running again, I braced 



myself. I nearly dropped dead 
when he answered with a 
simple "yes." 

This was what I had been 
waiting for. I knew all those 
hours of chasing 
administrators through the 
halls, stalking them from 
behind, and leaving messages 
with their secretaries would 
pay off. I was finally going to 
talk to an administrator! 

As my pulse slowed and 
my heartbeat regulated, I 
asked him for any 
information he had on the 
administration. "No 
comment!" he called over his 
shoulder as he turned to 
leave. 

WHO ME? . . . Rounding up stray 
students, Mr. Dan Gallagher, dean of 
boys, tries to empty the halls during 
classes. 




PAPER PILE . . . Studying his grade 
transcript, Mrs. Marilyn Dearing, 
college guidance counselor, prepares 
to send off a college application for 
Matt Albean. 



Administration/ 135 



f- FACULTY 



•MR. LEMAR BARNETT: 

Construction Industry, PVE Related, 
ICT Related, ICT PVE Coordination 
•MR. WILLIAM BAUER: Printing. 
Intro, to Industry •MR. RALPH 
BEDWELL: Humanities Center 
Director, Man and Society, 
Economics •MRS. DORIS 
BRADFORD: English Dept. Head, 
English 4, English 4G 'MRS. DIANE 
BRAMDSIETTER: Health, Drug Ed. 



•MRS. MONICA BURGESS: Director 
of Student Activities, Counselor, 
Orientation •MRS. KATHRYN 
BURKS: Advanced Latin, Etymology, 
English 4, Latin 12 •MRS. 
PERNELLA BURNS: Special Ed., 
English 4, English 2, Intro, to Math 
•MISS JEANNE BURROUGHS: 
Intensive Office Lab, Clerical 
Practice, Small Business, lOL 
Coordination •MS. SUSAN BURTON: 
English 1-2, English 1-2 

•MRS. JACQUELYNE CAIN: 
Counselor, Orientation •MISS DORIS 
CAMPBELL: Performing Arts •MRS. 
ELFI CICAK: German 5-8, Hum. 
Spec., Ethnic Man, American 
Religions •MRS. JOHNNIE CLIFF: 
Algebra 1-2, Gen. Math •MR. 
TOMMIE CURLIN. JR.: Vice 
Principal, Buildings and Grounds 



•MRS. BRENDA CUSHENBERRY: 

Special Ed., Intro, to Social Studies, 
U.S. History, Economics •MRS. 
DOLORES DAVIS: Theatre, 
Performing Arts, Speech, Drama, 
Forensics, OBRC Director •MRS. 
MARILYN DEARING: Guidance 
Director, Service Learning 'MR. LEO 
DEMING: Astronomy, Physical 
Science MR. KENT DEMMARY: 
Biology, Physical Science 



•MRS. GLORIA DOZIER: Assistant 
Dean, Attendance Office •MISS 
BRENDA DYKE: Health, Biology 
•MISS SILVIJA DZELME: Dept. 
Head, French 1-2, 5-10 "MR. HENRY 
EASTER. JR.: Vice Principal, 
Scheduling •MS. RENEE ECHOLS: 
Humanities Curriculum Developer 



•MR. BILL EVANS: Power 
Mechanics, Intro, to Industry •MRS. 
MELINDA FAIRBURN: Man and 
Society, English 34 'MR. RUDOLPH 
FINNELL: Music Theory, Orchestra, 
Band. Jazz band •MR. ERNEST 
FRIGO: Basic Math. Algebra 3-4, 
General Math •MR. DAN 
GALLAGHER: Dean of Students 



I 




136/ Faculty 




■^ 



•MR. JOAN GANT: Ombudsperson 
•MR. DONALD GLENN: Principal 
•MRS. ELIZABETH GOERTEMILLER: 
Intro, to DE. DE Related, DE 
Coordinater •MRS. PATRICIA 
GULLICK: English 3-4, English 3-4G 
•MRS. SARAH HACK: Adv. Math 1 
2. Algebra 3-4 



•MISS HEATHER HALL: English as 
a Second Language •MR. DALE 
HAMNER: General Math, Computer 
Math, Algebra 12 •MRS. LAURA 
HEDGES: DancePerforming Arts 
•MR. MICHAEL HENDREN: Director 
of Production, Creative Man, 
American Studies 'MR. ALEJANDRO 
HERNANDEZ: Spanish 1-2, Spanish 
34 Spanish 9-10 



•MR. JAMES HINSHAW: Business 
Ed. Dept. Head, Business Machines, 
Business Arithmetic •MR. CLYDE 
HOCHSTEDLER: Math Dept. Head, 
General Math 1-2, Basic Math 1-2 
•MRS. FORNISS HOLLOWAY: 
English 1-2, Adv. Placement English, 
Adv. Composition •MRS. BARBARA 
HOOD: Business Ed. •MRS. 
GARNETTA HOOD: Basic Art 1-2 
Craft Design 1-2 



Offices keep Ripple clicking at rapid pace 




Like an intricate machine, 
BR had thousands of parts 
that kept it running everyday. 
Although the regular school 
day ran from 8-3, the 
secretarial, and bookstore 
staffs, Financial, and 
attendance office staffs 
worked a 7-5 job. There were 
announcements, attendance 
cards, books, school supplies 
and grade cards to handle. 

While the idea of no grades 
or attendance slips excited 
the imagaination of many 
students, it was obvious that 
without these offices, BR 
wouldn't exist. 

OFRCE STAFF — Back Row: Mrs. 
Barbara Ovelton, Mrs. Toni Johnson, 
Mrs. Patricia Johnson, Mrs. Geraldine 
Lee, Mrs. Lucy Dombrow, Miss 
Sylvia Wolf. Front Row: Mrs. Linda 
Orban, Mrs. Mary Adams, Mrs. 
Barbara Romeiser, Mrs. Virginia Link, 
Mrs. Marsha Barnett, Mrs. Jo Wolf. 



J 



Faculty/ 137 



( 

Teachers are people? 



Cold sweat dripping off my 
brow, I raced down the hall. 
They were everywhere, all 
sizes — short and tall — 
from the first floor to the 
third. Furtively, I glanced 
around for an escape. 
Suddenly, I was at a door. I 
sprinted to open it and 
cringed, there was Mr. 
Bedwell . . . smiling and 
wearing a cowboy hat. Would 
it never end? 

I quickly remembered that 
the gym might be my way 
out. I hurdled the steps and 



ran into the gym. My exit 
was barred by Mr. 
Huckleberry practicing his 
jump shot. Suddenly, they 
were all around — laughing 
and joking. I backed into a 
corner, whimpering. They 
were closing in, the end was 
near. 

"Son, it's time to get up." I 
lurched out of bed and then 
sighed in relief. It was all a 
dream. I laughed quietly to 
myself. Imagine, teachers that 
acted like people. 




•MR. MAURICE HUCKLEBERRY: 

Psychology. Economics, Government 
•MR. WARREN JACKSON: Director 
of Evening Division •MRS. 
CONCETTA JOHNSON: English 
•MRS. LEIGH JOHNSON: Walk 
about Program Coordinator •MR. 
SHELDON KANTOR: Art Dept. 
Head. Art Appreciation, Ceramics 1-2, 
Adv. Ceramics, Photography, Adv. 
Photo Lab 



•MRS. WINNIE KEATON: Special 
Ed., English 1-6 •MRS. MARY JO 
KERSEY:Audio Visual Head •MRS. 
CONSTANCE KIRBY: Modern 
Literature, English 1-2G, English 3-4 
•MR. PATRICK KOERS: Head 
Football Coach. PE 12, Health. 
Drivers' Ed., Weight Training 'MRS. 
MARIAN KURTZ: Special Ed. Dept. 
Head 



•MISS SHIRLEY LAMBERT: 
Counselor, Orientation •MISS 
NANCY LANGAN: Social Worker 
•MRS. CAROL LATIMORE: Special 
Ed.. English 14 'MRS. SHIRLY 
LOYD: Dean of Students 'MR. 
JERRY LUCAS: Industrial Arts Dept. 
Head 



•MISS PHILLIS MARTIN: Housing, 
Foods 3-6 •MR. JAMES McCASLIN: 
Man and Art, Creative Man 'MRS. 
CHERYL McMANAMA: Government, 
Economics, Sociology, Student 
Council 'MRS. CHRISTIE 
MOULTON: German 1-4, French 14 
•MR. EDWARD O'NAN: Geometry 1 
2. Calculus 



I 




138/ Faculty 



FACULTY 





•MRS. LILLIAN OWENS: Learning 
Materials Center 'MRS. LYNN 
PALENIK: Basic Tech., Reading 
Experience 'MR. BARRY PATRICK: 
Performing Arts Head 'MR. THOMAS 
PAYNE: Social Studies Dept. Head, 
Economics, Government, U.S. History 
•MR. JAMES RAY: 
Newspaper/Yearbook Adviser, 
Journalism 



•MR. THOMAS RIENSCHE: PE 12 
•MR. GENE RING: Athletic Director, 
PE 'MR. ELLIOT SEGAL: 
Government, Economics, U.S. History 
•MR. NICHOLAS SELDON: 
Chemistry, Physics •MRS. MARY 
SIEGEL: Typing 1-2, Careers 



•MR. WILLIAM SIRKA: Physical Ed. 
Dept. Head, Health, Drivers' Ed., PE 
•SGT. ARATHA SMITH: ROTC 'MR. 
MARVIN SMITH: Biology, Adv. 
Biology "SGT. NORMAN STEWART: 
ROTC •MISS PHYLLIS TODD: PE 



•MRS. CHRISTINE TORKE: Writing 
for A Reason, American Studies *MR. 
RODERIC TRABOE: Counselor 'MS. 
PATRICIA VALENTINE: Performing 
Arts 'MISS LINDA VAN HOY: 
Folklore, Bible Lit. *MISS BARBARA 
VARGO: Counselor 



•MISS JANICE VERPLANK Special 
Ed., Math for Daily Living, Intro, to 
Math, Fundamentals of Math 'MRS. 
MARTHANA WALTERS: Creative 
Writing, English 3-4S, Adv. Reading 
•MRS. RUTH WEBB: Typing 12, 
Accounting, Business 
Communication, Careers *MISS 
EVELYN WHITE: Basic Biology, Man 
and Science *MRS. ALYCE WILSON: 
Craft Design, Adv. Art, Basic 



•MRS. CORRIE WILSON: Creative 
Man, 19th/20th Century 'MR. 
MICHAEL WYNN: Writing For 
Business, Man, Art and Drama 'MRS. 
DORIS YOONG: British Authors, 
Western Civilization, 19th/20th 
Century America, English 3-4 



J 



Faculty/ 139 







T-TT— I I I • II 
jj 1 I — 




ADS 









Where is all the money? 



As school began, naturally 
so did the complaining. 
Surprisingly, the complaints 
didn't involve education; the 
main problem was money. 
Where to get it? How to get 
it? But not how to spend it! 

BR became a money- 
hungry society. Book rental, 
supplies, lunch . . . 
everything seemed to cost 
more. Most of the necessities 
Mom and Dad helped with, 
but the not so necessary 



"necessities" were the 
responsibilities of the students 
themselves. 

Spending money became 
an obsession until the 
summer job money-supply 
ran out and wallets became 
pinched. Students found 
themselves cutting back on 
luxuries and trying to find 
part-time jobs to support their 
expensive tastes in the rich 
life. 




HfGyLAR 





iMJLEAPiD 




•5 



Id; 



^ 



NG PRICKS Pv.-i 

iline pii( i-s put <j 
damper on Hit? socmI lives ol many 
Ripplitf'S Jusi drivini) tn tind from 
srhoijl bcf jmi- ,im i-xp'Tisivc luihil 



CtlRRKNCY CARRIHR Holdinc) 

Ihc d.iy s f.jttiifuis. \\\>- 1)1 lokslorc 
(■fish rcqistfri sits wdilllu) to be 
I'lnptird .ind reset tni .-inother ddy nt 
-Wfilliiwiivi nil kf'ls .md dimes 




IsaoEB 



V. 



landriganjnc. 



^ealto. 




1901 EAST 62ND STREET 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 46220 



251-1491 




MIRROR IMAGE . . . Trying on the latest clothing styles, 
Sandy Miller admires herself in a mirror at the Fashion Attic. 

The Fashion Attic 

4717 W. 34th St. 
255-6666 





In Tune . . . Repairing a problem on Betsy Shackelford's car, a 
friendly mechanic at Mobile Auto Repair lends a helping hand. 

Mobile Auto Repair Service 

1050 E. 54th Street 
255-4076 



Retro-spect . . . Spending some time in Royle Attic Antiques, 
Hunt Waycott examines their canes and other merchandise. 

Royle Attic Antiques 

6267 Carrollton 
255-9066 



142/ Ads 



CENTRAL INDIANA OIL CO. 

uni^n 

Disrriburors Of Gasoline 

Diesel Fuel And Lubnconrs 

1-457 4383 





Good luck, Shortridge Class of 1982 — Friends of Shortridge 

Shortridge High School 



Ads/ 143 



Complete Home Repairs 

Cliss Remodeling 



18 Years Experience 

All Work Guaranteed 

Call 638-5518 




SURPRISING . . . Brett Sommers gains new insight to the 
female figure while shopping at Multi Media Art Material. 

Multi Media Art Material 

720 E. 65th St. 
255-8552 




LOOKING GOOD . . . Conrad Mains gets his hair cut and 
styled at Cerulli Barber Shop. 

Cerulli Barber Shop 
Glendale Shopping Center 

253-0775 



NOW BEFORE IT'S NEVER!! 

•interior Constructions Systems 
•Racquetball Court 

Terstep Co. Inc. 



9292 E. 131st St. 

Noblesville, Indiana 

317-849-3543 



144/Ads 



Distributer of Building Materials 

REESE CENTRAL WHOLESALE, 

INC. 

1155 East 54th Street 

Indianapolis, Indiana 46220 

(317) 251-2256 

* Residential & Commercial Roofing 

* Insulation — Siding — Suspended Ceilings 

* Kitchen Cabinets — Appliances 



Peggy Taylor's 

HAIRS BEAUTY CEKTER 




Congratulations 

Graduates!! 
— come in for 
that new look 
for your new 
job! 



6372 N GUILFORD- 
BROAD RIPPLE 

VILLAGE 

(3 BLOCKS EAST 

OF COLLEGE 

ON 64TH) 






"LOOKING GOOD is our BUSINESS" 




Buddenbaum 
Construction 

5506 CARVEL AVE. 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 46220 

317-253-9375 

EXPERIENCED CARPENTER 

REMODELING CARPENTER 

BONDED — LICENSED — INSURED 



COCK-A-DOODLE-DOO . . . Maya Roth gets 

advice from a rooster in the Deli 

Section of Atlas Supermarket. 

Atlas Supermarket 

720 E. 54th St. 
255-6800 



Ads/ 145 




Helping you capture the year! 



Josten's American Yearbook Co. 
Richard S. Maurer 

140 Napanee Dr. 

Carmel, In. 46032 

844-3549 



146/ Ads 



THANKSl THANKSI THANKS! 

Your reception to Godfathers Rzza has been 

incredible. Its obvious you are people of taste and 

distinction who appreciate the thickest, richest pizza 

in 53 counties. And boy do we appreciate 

your business. 

GogfaUier's Pizza 



1426 But 86th St. 

844-2882 
B806 Bast 82Bd St. 

842-6622 



PRODUCTION TOOLS OF 
INDIANA 



Max B. Miller 

Vice-President And Former Chairman 

Of Broad Ripple's Father's Assoc. 

3201 N. Meridian St. #1 

Indpls., IN 46208 

926-0428 



Graham Electronics Supply Inc. 



architectural brick & tile 



We specialize in unique and beautiful 



building materials and components — 



133 S. Pennsylvania St. 
Indianapolis, In. 46204 
634-8202 



8091 Center Run Dr. 
Indianapolis 46250 
253-4351 



147/ Ads 




CONSTRUCTION WITH A "K" . . . Raising a 
new Kiwanis building from the rubble and 
snow, workers brave the winter weather. 

The Tri-K Family 
Kiwanis — Circle K. — Key Club 



Ads/ 148 



Second Time Around 

930 Broad Ripple Ave. 
255-8008 



GOOD LUCK CLASS OF "83" 



From the Junior Cabinet 



Eggplant Inc. 

We're Making Our Mari< 





TOOT 



19811982 



QTPi 



DAMCIN' SHOES . . . Trying on new ballet shoes at Kinney 
Dancewear, Angela Stotler looks for the right fit. 

Kinney Dancewear Inc. 

2434 E. 62nd St. 
255-8111 



1981-1982 



Ads/ 149 




Engledow's Flower and Foliage 



6101 rs. Keystone 
257-4966 



the accent shop 

has neat earrings, rubber stamps, 
stickers, buttons and fun note paper 
among other things students "need" 

6180 hillside avenue 251-9221 



Bud Wolf Chevrolet 

Service Sales Leasing 

1115 Broad Ripple Ave. 

(Mext to BRHS) 
257-4461 



FINE PHOTOGRAPHY 



2S7-22S3 




STUDIO. INC. 



819 E WESTFIELD BLVD 
INDIANAPOLIS. IN 46220 



150/Ads 




DON HOCK 

1210 North Payton 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46219 



Josten's 

1210 N. Payton 

Indianapolis, Indiana 

359-2550 



Phone: (317) 359-2550 
CREATORS OF 
FINE CLASS RINGS 
AWARDS 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
DIPLOMAS 
CAPS AND GOWNS 



Ads/ 151 




NO STRINGS ATTACHED . . . Trying to fit a large bouquet of balloons onto the company van, Steve Hill and Michael 
Sherman have their hands full. 

Balloons a' Bloomin' 

5639 N. Washington Blvd. 
257-1864 



» » 



tJ^ 



The Off Broad Ripple Company 

Traveling Drama Group — No Charge 
Minne — Skits — Fables 

Season — October thru May 
Contact Ms. Dolly Davis 266-4005 




152/ Ads 



Indianapolis Art League 

820 East 67th 
255-2464 



MAC'S BICYCLE SHOP 

815 E. Westfield Blvd. 
257-3349 




GREEN THCJMB ... As a special service to BR. Mrs. Sylvia Hill 
nurtures the green house. 

Congratulations Reparian Editors 
and Graduating Seniors 

Compliments of 
Douglas and Sylvia Hill 





HAND OGTS ... While picking up her clothes at Dearing 
Cleaners, Tara Jackson makes an unusual acquaintance. 



Deering Cleaners 

6380 N. College 
251-2517 



Ads/ 153 



B 
R 

E 
D 

'8 
2 




B 
R 

E 
D 

'8 
2 



Class, no matter how you slice it. 

Clars Danvold, Brett Sommers, Doug Jones, Mark Dorsey, Tim Johnson 




BMF CREW . . . Brian Bill, J.C. Walker, Hunt Waycott, Scott Steele, Mark Mendel, Jeff Jackson, Sandy Miller, Mark 
Walker, Gary Steele, David Moriarty. 

CONGRATGLATIONS SENIORS! 
SKY HIGH BMF CREW OF "82" 



154/ Ads 




uyton 







P A I n T P R U C T S , I n J^ 

■'BUY PAINT FROM A PAINT SPECIALIST' 

PAINTS 



WHOLESALE — RETAIL 
INDUSTRIAL - RESIDENTIAL SINCE 1935 



OOAE^fifiiiS 



^^ 




NEW LOCATION! 



"Phone". 



842-6772 



SAME DAY 
DELIVERY SERVICE 

BILL GVYTON 

GARY HUME 

KENNY ROGERS-RUSS CUNNINGHAM 

HAROLD TAYLOR 



LASItiSnOT 




JXXS WtST OF ^ # 



5292 E. 65TH ST. 

7:30 AM TO 5:00 PM WEEKDAYS 
7:30 AM TO 12 NOON SATURDAYS 




TINY TOTS . . . Thinking back to their pre-school days, Jenny 
Moffatt, Tara Jackson and Clars Danvold try on articles from 
Kid Stuff in Glendale. 

Kid Stuff 

6101 N. Keystone 
259-4911 




GONE FISHIN' . . . Dressed in boots and holding a fish net 
from the Broad Ripple Sports Shop, Beth Hill prepares for a 
fishing trip. 

Broad Ripple Sports Shop 

1015 E. Westfield Blvd. 
253-6658 




91 1 Broad Ripple Awe.\^ Indianapolis, Indiana 46220 
ll 257-7116 



Ads/ 155 




w 



156/ Ads 



INDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDI 



aaa 



Aasen, Elizabeth . . . 104 

Able, Jeff 116 

Abel, Lisa ... 127 

Abel, Ron ... 127 

Adams, Carol . . . 104 

Adams, Denise . . . 60, 116 

Adams, Eric ... 104 

Adams, Julie . 50, 76, 

121 

Adams, Mrs. Mary . . 137 

Adams, Ptiillip .86 

Adeniyi, Julius ... 28 

Albean, Matthew ... 104, 

167 

Aldridge, Andrea . . 116 

Alexander, Mark .89, 

104 

Alexander, Marvella . . . 

121 

Alexander, Sabrina . . 66, 

127 

Allen, Donna . . 127 

Allen, Sheial . . 127 

Allen, Yolanda ... 121 

Anderson, Charles . . 116 

Anderson, George ... 10, 

75, 76, 79, 98, 99, 65, 104 

Anderson, Kelly ... 121 

Anderson, LaDonna . . 

127 

Anderson, LaWanna . . . 

68, 69, 104 

Anderson, Timothy . . . 

116 

Anderson, Tomika . . . 127 

Appel, Susan ... 5, 6, 58, 

51, 60, 97, 98, 104, 165 

Archie, LaShaun . . 121 

Armstrong, Teresa ... 121 

Arnold, Rachel ... 127 

Arnold, Renee . . . 24, 46, 

47, 91, 98, 116 

Arnold, Robert ... 89, 104 

Arnold, Steve ... 121 

Arthur, Melissa ... 116 

Ashley, Scott ... 121 

Atkins. Yvette ... 127 



Aurs, Tim . . . 127 
Austin, Andrew ... 16, 60, 
65. 104 

Austin, Yanita . 74, 121 
Avant, Anthony . . 68, 69 
Avant, Sara ... 104 
Avery, Tim .86 

bbb 



Badger, Steve . 34, 50, 

64, 65, 94, 98, 116 

Bailey, Karen . . 90, 121 

Baker, Cindy ... 127 

Baker, Melissa . 86, 116 

Ball, Roger .104 

Bankhead, Valerie ... 82 

Banks, Randall ... 4. 28, 

29 

Barber, Kevin ... 116 

Baker, Jessica .86, 89, 

116 

Barlow, Kivya .65, 69, 

82, 104 

Barnett. Mr. Lemar ... 89, 

136 

Barnhart. Chris . . 100. 

101, 116 

Barrow, James . . . 68, 127 

Bartlett, Roxanne . . . 46, 

121 

Basile. Jeff ... 127 

Baxter, William ... 28, 

127 

Bauer, William ... 136 

Beatty, Kenneth ... 121 

Beaupain, Tammy . . . 69, 

127 

Bedwell, Ralph ... 70, 136 

Beene, Mrs. Betty ... 86 

Behroozi, Parastoo . . . 76, 

127 

Behroozi, Rouzbeh ... 79, 

104 



Bellinger, Cheryl . . 69, 
93, 94, 116 

Bankhead, Valerie ... 121 
Bennett, Anna . 65, 75, 
76, 77, 98, 104 
Bennett, Michelle . . 121 
Benning, Benise ... 121 
Benning, Elka ... 104 
Berry, Marjorie . . . 104 
Berry, Yolanda ... 116 
Betry, James . . 127 
Beverly, Gena . 104 
Bey, Lionel 127 

Beymer, Carol ... 116 
Bibbs, Melanie ... 69, 116 
Bibbs, Vincent ... 121 
Bigham, Jenny ... 8, 34, 
35, 50, 97, 121 
Bigsbee, Anthony . . . 28, 
38 

Bigsbee, Foriest ... 127 
Bigsbee, Jenny ... 116 
Bill, Brian .. 32, 65, 71, 
80, 101, 121 
Bivens, Darr ... 68 
Black, Francine ... 105 
Black, Liz ... 127 
Blackwell, Willie ... 121 
Blacky, Lee . . . 127 
Blaine, Edward ... 105. 
139 

Blakey, Merle ... 121 
Bland, Dennis ... 25. 43. 
116 

Bledsoe, Jacqueline . . . 
105 

Bledsoe, Michelle ... 82, 
121 

Bledsoe, Sheila ... 121 B 
Blomberg, Jeff ... 121 
Blome, Mary Beth ... 24, 
32, 33, 50, 60, 65, 101, 
105 

Bluitt, Kimberly ... 127 
* Bolen, Tracy ... 127 
Bond, Jerry ... 68, 127 



Bowling, Michael 


. 69, 


76, 77, 121 




Bowman, Brian . 


. 38 


Bowman, Nancy 


.. 69. 


127 




Boyd, Rita . . 116 


Boyd, Rochelle . . 


. 53, 69 


105 




Boyd, Yolanda . . 


. 52, 53, 


69, 77, 101, 121 




Bradford, Mrs. Doris 


136 




Bradley, Derrick 


. . 127 


Branam, Kevin . . 


121 


Brandstetter, Mrs. 


Diana 


.136 




Braswell, Wendy 


. . 68, 


127 




Braxton, Wilbur . 


. . 86, 


116 




Brayton, Troy . . 


68 


Brayton, Willbert 


.90 


Brewer, Willie . . 


127 


Bridgeforth, Bridget . . . 


127 




Briggs, Shetone . 


.. 116 


Briscoe, Patsy . . 


5. 69, 


105 




Brittain, Keith . . 


121 


Bonds, DeeDee . 


. 105 


Bonds. Denise . . 


86 


Bornstein, Beth . 


. 121 


Boswell, Lorenzo 


. .. 121 


Bowe, David . . . 


127 


Bowling, Denise . 


.. 76, 


77, 98, 101, 116 




Brittain, Kirk . . . 


2, 17, 6C 


65, 75, 101, 116 




Broadus, Mr. Eric 


... 83, 


82, 92 




Broder, Kathleen 


...69 


Brooks, Keewanna ... 68, 


69, 121 




Brooks, Michelle 


.. 50, 


76. 101, 116 




Brooks, Shannon 


...86 


Browder, Kathy . 


. . 127 


Brown, Charles . 


. 89 


Brown, Cynthia . 


. 86 




Brown, Damon . . 91 , 116 

Brown, Dave . . 116 

Brown, Geary . . 69, 91, 

116 

Brown, Kim . 127 

Brown, Lester ... 33 

Brown, Margie ... 86, 105 

Brown, Maria ... 121 

Brown, Rickey . . . 32, 33 

Brown, Roosevelt ... 121 

Brown, Tim ... 86, 116 

Brown, Tony ... 31, 68, 

127 

Bruce, Felisa . . 89, 91, 

105 

Brummer, Susan . . . 34, 

35, 50, 71, 94, 100, 101. 

121 

Bruson. Michael ... 127 

Bryant. Dewayne ... 121 

Bryant. Reedlyn ... 116 

Bryant. Monica ... 5. 37, 

69, 71. 76. 99, 121 

Bubenzer, Cindy . . . 36, 

37, 50, 71, 94, 121 

Buckner, Barnettia . . . 76, 

101, 121 

Buddenbaum, Beth . . . 

101, 127 

Bullock, Delvin ... 82 

Bullock, Kim ... 127 

Bullock, Sinclair ... 91 

Burge, Deana ... 105 

Burgess, Mrs. Monica . . . 

136 

Burkley, Jennifer . . . 66, 

127 

Burkley, John ... 37, 116 

Burks, Mrs. Katherine . . . 

136 

Burnett. Mrs. Marsha . . . 

136 

Burns. Danny ... 86 

Burns. Mrs. Pernella . . . 

53, 136 

Burns, Susan . . . 76. 127 

Burris, Jerry ... 38 

Burroughs. Miss Jeanne 

... 86, 136 

Burton, Miss Susan . . . 

136 

Bury, Rodara ... 76, 127 

Bush, Lisa ... 90 

Bush, Valorie ... 105 

Butler, Eric ... 127 

Butler, Stacey ... 127 



ccc 



Cain, Mrs. Jacquelyne . . . 

136 

Calbert, Angela ... 128 

Calbert, Lynda ... 116 

Calbert, Michelle ... 127 

Calkins, Peggy . . 34, 35, 

60, 65, 97, 102, 116 

Callahan, John ... 91 

Callahan, Scott ... 69, 

121 

Campbell, Miss Dorris . . . 

136 

Campbell, Bobby . . 116 

Cannon, Shelly . . . 128 

Carson, Aloric ... 116 

Carson, William . . 121 

Carter, David . . 128 

Carter, Ed 7, 28, 50, 

105 



Carter, Kalvin 44, 126 

Carter, Kevin ... 28 

Carter, LaChelle ... 86, 

101, 106 

Carter, Mike ... 28, 31, 

121 

Cartwright, Craig . . . 121 

Cartwright, Tyrone . . . 121 

Caudle, Anthony ... 81, 

82, 99, 121 

Cauldwell, Jeff . . 128 

Chambers, David . . . 69, 

121 

Chambers, Dennis ... 121 

Channin, Ceil . . 79, 117 

Chapman, Anthony 

106 

Chappell, Shelly ... 53, 

66, 69, 128 

Cheatham, Lisa ... 53, 69, 

121, 128 

Chenault, Elaine . . . 51, 

99, 121 

Cheshire, Paul ... 50, 106 

Childs, Catherine ... 106 

Childs, Helen ... 86, 117 

Chin, Lily ... 117 

Chisholm, James ... 128 

Chubbs, Daniel ... 91, 

121 

Chubbs, Theresa . . . 82, 

98, 106 

Cizak, Mrs. Elfl ... 136 

Clack, Craig ... 121 

Clark, Don 28, 117 

Clay, Kim ... 128 

demons, Anthony ... 89 

Clemmons, JudI . . . 33, 

53, 65, 69, 117 

Cliff, Mrs. Johnnie ... 136 

Cllne, Celia ... 128 

Cobb, Charles ... 44, 121 

Cohen, Beryl ... 117 

Colbert, Cheryl ... 86, 87, 

106 

Colbert, Kern ... 67, 117 

Cole, Tyrone ... 128 

Coleman, Alex ... 106 

Coleman, Karen . . . 46, 

121 

Coleman, Lorraine . . . 128 

Coleman, Margaret ... 8 

Coleman, Marilyn ... 86 

Coleman, Shanna . . . 121 

Collier, Luther ... 28, 89, 

106 

Collins, Katie ... 86 

Collins, Patricia ... 86 

Collins, Sharon . . . 121 

Collins, Theresa ... 86 

Collins, Tina ... 117 

Collins, Will ... 76 

Cooper, Fairy ... 33 

Cooper, Sherry ... 89 

Cooper, William ... 117 

Cooper, Zachery . . . 86, 

117 

Cooreman, Dawn . . . 60, 

65, 65, 97, 117 

Cooreman, Lisa . . . 56, 64, 

65, 101, 106 

Cork, Tony . . 128 

Corlett, Mike . . 117 

Cornelius, Clarence . . . 

121 

Cornner, Maria . . 106 

Cornwell, John ... 128 

Costello, Diane ... 117 

Cottrell, Connie ... 86, 89, 

91, 106 



LUNCH BREAK . Stopping at the City Market 
for lunch after a Swing Choir show, Andrew Austin 
and Brett Sommers enjoy their food In the open-air 
atmosphere. 



Index/ 157 



SDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDE 



Council. Brenda 

Covington. Brenda 

Covington. Tamra 

128 

Covington, Vivian . 

90 

Cowherd. Johnnie 



106 

128 
. 66. 

66. 

. . 89 



Cox, Ann 16. 50. 65. 

98. 101. 106 

Cox. Eliiabeth .66. 76. 

81. 99. 128 

Cox. Rachelle 128 

Cox, Rhonda 128 

Crabb, Beth ... 71, 75, 

106 

Crawford, Carrie . 117 

Crawford, Cynthia . 128 

Cray ton, Troy ... 121 

Crevelir>g, Richard . . . 32. 

76. 117 

Crisp. John ... 69, 128 

Croom. Terrance . . . 121 

Cross. Connie ... 128 

Crossland. Kurt . . . 106 

Crumpton. Terrance . . 

25, 28, 49, 50, 86, 117 
Cunningham, Linda .86 
Cunningham, Steve . . . 
117 

Curlin, Mr. Tommie . . . 
134. 136 

Curry, Richard . . . 65, 106 
Curtis, John . . 128 
Curtis. Paul ... 117 
Cushenberry. Adrian . . . 

26. 27. 86. 98. 101. 106 
Cushenberry, Mrs. Brenda 
... 136 

Cushenberry, Tony ... 32, 
33 

ddd 



5. 53. 



Dannielle. Anne . 

60. 69. 101. 117 

Daniels, Steven . 

Danvold. Clars . 

60, 66, 81, 101, 

Darrish, John . . 

Dartis. Alfred . . 

Davidson, April 

Davis. Charles . 

Davis. Cheryl . 

Davis, Clinton 

Davis, Dion 

Davis, Mrs. Delores 

60, 61. 136 

Davis. Eon 

Davis. Evelyn 

Davis, Gerard 

Davis. Hank . 

Davis. J.B. . . 

Davis, James . . 

Davis. Karen 

Davis. Keith 

128 

Davis. Linda . 

Davis. Patrick . 

Davis. Reuben 

Davis. Sherry 

Davis. Thor . . . 

Dawson. Emily 

Day. David 

Day. James 

Day. Martisha 

Dearing. Mrs. Marilyn . . . 

135. 136 

Dcberry. Yvette 117 

DeBruler. Stacy 56. 65 

Dedeaux. Hanelon 128 

Deffendall. James 86, 



86 
14, 56. 
106 
. . 45 
. 28, 121 

86 
. . 38. 43 
. 86 
. 43, 117 
233. 101 

56, 



121 

76, 1 28 
.117 

117 
117 

28 
. 66, 128 
31. 49. 

33 
121 
89 
. 90 
121 

128 
128 

86. 117 
. 128 



106 

Dehnke. Mr. Ron 
Deloney. Lashall . 
69. 86. 128 
Deming, Mr. Leo 
Demery, Mr. Kent 
Dennis, Chris . , . 
Dennis, Kevin . . . 
Dennison, Kim . . 
DeWalt, Johnny . 



.70 
53, 

136 
.136 
31, 128 
106 
128 
. 128 



128 
.. 35. 



38, 89, 



8, 65, 



121 



Dial, Joanle ... 69, 

Diekmann, DIanna 

128 

Dixon, Derrick 

107 

Dixon, Kenny 

68, 69, 121 

Dobbins, Geraldlne 

Doge, Henry ... 128 

Dooley, Mike ... 31, 96. 

128 

Dorsey, Mark ... 26, 41, 

56, 60, 65, 83, 98, 101, 

197 

Doty, Karen ... 79, 117 

Dozier, April ... 117 

Dozier, Mrs. Gloria ... 136 

Dubard. Denise .16 

Dudgeon. Cathy ... 122 

Dullen. Tanya . . . 122 

Duncan. Derick . 

Duncan. Joan . . . 

Duncan, Lonnie . 

128 

Duncan. Madeline 

128 

Duncan, R.H. . . 

Duncan, Tina . 

Dunn, Robin . . 

Dunning, Shelly 

Durrett, Jim . . 

122 

Dycus, Eric . . 

Dye, Patrick . . 

Dyke, Miss Brenda . 

Dzelme, Miss Sylvija 

76, 136 



. 18 
117 
. 122, 

... 66, 

. 107 
. 122 

128 
.122 

5. 65, 97, 



122 
128 



136 



eee 



Henry 



26, 



Easter, Mr 

134, 136 

Ecoles, Miss Renee . . . 

136 

Edmonds. David .69 

Edmonds. Tina . . 89. 

117 

Edmonson, Candace . . . t 

67. 75. 99, 107 

Edmondson. Richard . . . 

129 

Edmund. Linda .86 

Edmunds. David ... 122 

Edwards. Blanche . . . 66, 

129 

Edwards. Demetrius . . . 

28. 89, 107 

Edwards, Mila 

Edwards, Stacey 

Eldridge, Bobbie 

69, 76, 129 

Elkins, Donny 

Elkins, Sharon 

Ellis. Cathy 37 

Engleking. David . 

40. 107 

Essenberg. Amy 

97. 129 

Essenberg. Michelle 

67. 97, 101, 122 

Essex, William ... 122 

Evans, James . 79, 129 



122 
.117 
66, 

107 
122 

11, 



35, 



8, 



Evans, Kelly ... 50. 76, 

99, 122 

Evans, Mr. Bill ... 136 

Evans, Tracey ... 129 

Eversole. Geraldine 

129 



66, 



fff 



122 
76, 



129 
69, 



129 
122, 



Falrburn, Mrs. Melinda 

136 

Faucett. Shcara . 

Fauteck, Annette 

97, 107 

Feeney, Terry . . 

Feltner, Charles . 

122 

Feltner, Jeff .69, 

Fendley, Darlene . . 

129 

Fenstermaker, Alison . . . 

35, 66, 129 

Fenstermaker, Mrs. Sandy 

... 34, 35 

Fields, Annette ... 129 

Finchum, John ... 117 

Finnel, Eloise ... 69 

Finnell, Mr. Rudolph . . . 

54, 68, 69, 136 

Finnell, Tony . . 122 

Fisher, Kelley ... 86, 117 

Fisher, Terri ... 86 

Fitts, Troy ... 43, 117 

Fitzgerald, Bruce ... 117 

Fitzgerald, Zenophia . . . 

33, 56, 107 

Fledderjohn, Heidi ... 67, 

71, 101, 121 

Fleming, Kim . 

Flemming, Eric 

Floyd, Kenny . 

Floyd, Kim . . 

Foley, Jenny . 

100. 101, 129 

Foster, Helen 

Foster, Paula 

Ford, Candi . . 

Fout, Pam . . . 

Fox, Pam . . . 

Fraction, Gary 



122 

.117 

. . 45, 129 

86, 117 

. . 57, 66, 

122 
. . 99, 117 
. 117 
122 
122 
. . . 91. 121 



Franlin, Ed . .28, 107 



Franklin, Karen . 
Frieson. John . . . 
Frierson, Latonya 
Frigo, Mr. Ernest 
Frizzle, Naom . . 
Fugate, Price . . 



122 
122 

...74 
.136 
122 
129 



G9Q 



Gaines, Tammy . . 

Gallagher, Mr. Dan 

101, 135, 136 

Galloway. Paul . . . 

117 

Galloway, Steve . . 

129 

Gant, Mr. Juan . . . 

Gant. Michael . . . 

Gant. Ronetta . . . 

Gardener, Michelle 

Garey, Katherine 

Garmany, Eric 

129 

Garmany, Michael 

32, 33, 49, 50, 99, 

Garrett, Fred 

Garret, Michael 

68, 71, 122 



107 



5, 68. 

. 69. 

. 137 
65, 122 
117 

129 
. 122 
68. 69. 

.7. 
107 
86, 117 
28, 67. 




Garrett. Octavia 
Garrett. Victor . . 
Gartin. Alfred . . 
Gatens. MimI . . 



. . 122 
. 122 
117 
11, 60, 



BRANCHING OUT . . . High up in a tree at 
Marrott Park during a "Senior blow-off day," Cris 
Johnson yells to his friends far below. 



94, 97, 100, 101, 117 
George. Brian ... 117 
George. Robert ... 129 
Gibson, Becky . . 129 
Gibson, Linda . . . 86, 1 17 
Gilbert, Caria . . 129 
Gill, Paula ... 51, 129 
Gleason, Terryan . . 68. 
129 

Gleson. Roger ... 122 
Glenn. Mr. Donald . . 26. 
28. 134. 137 

Glunt. Steve , . 93. 117 
Glunt. Susan .8, 52, 53, 
69, 74, 76, 97, 122 
Godfrey, Steve 99. 129 

Goerlemiller, Mrs. Elizabeth 

137 
Goff, Mike ... 31 
Gogulis, Linda . . 53. 69, 
129 

Goldsberry, Rhonda 
67. 101. 122, 117 
Golf, Michael . 129 
Gooch, William . 129 
Goode, Mac . . 27. 36. 
37. 64. 65. 117 
Goodbow. William . . 129 
Goodner. Robert ... 31. 
49. 129 

Goodnight. Richard 75. 

121 

Grady. Leslie ... 28. 49. 
69. 122 



Grady. Yolanda ... 129 

Graham, Debra ... 117 

Graham, Doyce 117 

Graham, Matt 36, 67, 

84, 94, 122 

Graham, Patricia . . 33, 

53. 122. 129 

Graham, William 129 

Grant, Rodetta .90 

Graves. Maureen 67. 

90. 122 

Gray, Felicia ... 122 

Gray, Jon . . 122 

Gray, Raymond 122 

Gray, Terrance 117 

Gray. Tracey . . 86. 1 17 

Grayson. Sherman .89 

Green. Dan . 129 

Green. Roger 117 

Green. Tamara 129 

Greene. Leona 90, 122 

Grider, Stephanie 97, 

107 

Griffith, Jon 122 

Grimes, Elizal)eth . . . 35, 

50, 60, 94, 95, 98. 101. 

107 

Grimes. Susannah 51. 

94. 100. 129 

Grimm, Ronald 107 

Grubbs. Clint 129 



Grubbs. Lea . . 89 

Gunnell. Michael 38 

Gullick. Mrs. Patricia . . . 

137 

Guthrie, Cristy ... 86, 98, 

107 

Guthrie, Erica ... 98, 117 

hhh 



Hack. Mrs. Sarah 


84, 


137 






Haines. John .31 




Hall. Miss 


Heather 


137 


Hamilton. 


Angela 


46. 


122 






Hamilton, 


Anthony 


.117 


Hamilton, 


Ronald 


122, 


129 






Hamiter, 


Jackie . . 


122 


Hammonc 


s, Jacque 




13, 60, 64, 65. 74. 75, 79, 


107 






Hamner, Mr Dale . . 


137 


Hampton, 


Darryl 


68. 


86 






Hampton, 


Joseph 


117 



158/ Index 



INDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXIND 



Hannah, Cathy . 12. 107 
Hanson, David ... 36 
Hardy. Benson . 129 
Hardy. Paula . . 36. 107 
Harker, Mr. John .33 
Harper, Anna ... 81, 107 
Harper, Kelli . . 117 
Harrel, Terri .53, 66, 69 
Harris, Don . 43, 122 
Harris, Drena ... 122 
Harris, Earl . . 117 
Harris, Jody . . . 123 
Harris, Karen ... 129 
Harris, Kevin . . 69, 129 
Harris, Mike .31 
Harris, Richard ... 108 
Harris, Tammy . . . 123 
Harris, Torin .89 
Harris, Warren . . 69, 129 
Harrison, Denise . . 123 
Harrison, Teri ... 117 
Hart, Melinda ... 67 
Harvey, Lisa ... 129 
Harvey, Sarah ... 66, 100 
101, 129 
Harvey, Shannon ... 17, 

55, 65, 101, 117 
Harvey, Sheila . . . 123 
Hasler. Ricky ... 6, 62, 
63, 65, 71, 80, 123 
Hart, Melynda ... 123 
Hatcher, David ... 45, 89, 
129 

Hatcher, Gary . 28, 86, 

118 

Hatton, Stanley ... 129 

Hawkins, Bessie ... 123 

Hayden. Albert ... 28 

Hayden. Anitra ... 118 

Hayden. Anthony ... 123 

Hayes. Janice ... 90. 123 

Haynes, Mr. John ... 28. 

74 

Hay worth. Sheila 123 

Hayworth, Theresa ... 66 

Hazel, Richard . . 65, 71, 

77, 123 

Hedges, Mrs. Laura . . . 

137 

Helm, William .45 

Henderson, Adrian ... 118 

Henderson, Bhyron . . . 

129 

Henderson, Keith . . 71, 

75, 79, 83, 94, 108 
Henderson, Rejina ... 129 
Henderson, Mark ... 118 
Hendren, Mr. Michael . . 

56. 137 

Hendrikson. Melissa . . 7i 

Hendron. Mark 86 

Henn. Mary . . . 66. 76. 

129 

Henry. Cynthia ... 118 

Hensel. Chris . . 89. 108 

Hernandez. Mr. Alejandro 

70. 137 
Herod. Andy ... 86, 108 
Highsaw, Cara . . 118 
Highsaw, Kimberly . 67. 
108 

Hill, Elizabeth .60, 97, 
98, 108, 164. 165 
Hill, Stephen 6. 31, 66, 

76. 77. 100, 101. 129 
Hill, Tammy .129 
Hill, Tina 33, 123 
Hill, Tracy .123 
Hillard, Tony 31 
Hilliard. Janise 86. 108 
Hindman. Anita 65. 73. 
79. 108 

Hinshaw. Mr. James 
137 



Hochsledler. Mr. Clyde . . . 

137 

Hoesman. Andrew ... 108 

Hoesman, Byron ... 123 

Holland. Crystal . . 123 

Hollins. Warren . 118 

Holloway, Mrs. Furniss 

137 

Holman, Michael .68 

Hood, Mrs. Barbara . . . 

137 

Hood, Demetrius ... 129 

Hood, Mrs. Garnetta . . . 

74. 137 

Hood, Melissa ... 67, 129 

Hooks, Steven ... 129 

Hopson, Theresa ... 129 

Hornback, April . 69, 

108 

Horsewood, David ... 123 

Horton, Jackie . 86, 108 

Hoseclaw, Lori ... 108 

Hoseclaw, Terri . . 5, 173 

House, Derek .123 

Hubbard, Melanie . . 76, 

118 

Hubbard. Rob . . 118 

Hudgens. Lois . . . 123. 

129 

Hudkins. James ... 108 

Hudson. David ... 33, 123 

Huckleberry, Mr. Maurice 

.138 

Huffman, Kelly ... 129 

Huffman, Samantha . . . 

129 

Huggins, Yolanda ... 129 

Hughes, Charles ... 129 

Hughes, Donna . . . 86, 

108 

Hughes, Eileen ... 129 

Hughes, Margaret ... 66, 

129 

Hurn, Cynthia .66 

Hurt. James . . . 129 

Hurt. Tony ... 123 

Huse, Denise ... 83, 123 

Hutchison, Robert ... 130 

• •• 



111 



Ireland, Jon . 45, 130 
Irmiger, Gretchen ... 118 
Ison, Frankie . 123 



lU 



Jackson, Carmen . 123 

Jackson, Clinton . 108 

Jackson, Jeff 32, 33, 

50, 65. 97. 101. 123 

Jackson. Leslie . . 69. 

130 

Jackson. Michelle ... 130 

Jackson. Tara 35. 55. 

60. 61, 65. 75. 81. 97. 100. 

101. 118 

Jackson. Theresa . 108. 

118 

Jackson. Tim 28, 29. 

68. 108 

Jackson, Mr. Warren 

138 

Jacobs, Debra 123 

Jacobs, Lori 123 



James, Mary . . 54, 65, 

65. 95, 98, 108 

Jameson, Harold . . . 79, 

108 

Jarrett, Tyrone . . 

Jarvar, Deanne 47, 90 

Jefferson, Arlene . 90, 

130 

Jefferson, Dennis ... 123 

Jefferson. Keith ... 130 

Jefferson. Oliver .89 

Jelks. Timothy . . 109. 89 

Jelks, William ... 123 

Jenson, Bill ... 118 

Jerasa, Frank ... 71. 118 

Jessup, Marie . . . 33. 86, 

109 

Jett, Crystal .93 

Johnson, Allen . . . 65, 71, 

80, 94, 97, 122 

Johnson, Arlene ... 118 

Johnson, Mrs. Concetta 

138 
Johnson, Chris . . . 109, 
163 

Johnson, Dean . . . 28, 29, 
56, 109 

Johnson, Derek ... 118 
Johnson, Ivan . . 57, 118 
Johnson, John ... 109 
Johnson, Kevin ... 31, 
130 

Johnson, Kimberly . . 47, 
109, 130 

Johnson, Kristi ... 118 
Johnson, Kurt ... 31. 130 
Johnson, Mrs. Leigh . . . 
70. 139 

Johnson. Mike ... 10, 62. 
65, 84, 94, 97, 123 
Johnson, Pam ... 65 
Johnson, Mrs. Patricia . . . 
137 

Johnson, Ray . . 123 
Johnson, Reginald . . 123 
Johnson, Shawna . . . 79, 
118 

Johnson, Tammy . . 86, 
91, 118 

Johnson, Terry ... 130 
Johnson, Timothy ... 2, 
13, 40, 41, 59, 60, 62, 63, 
64, 65, 76, 84, 97, 98. 101. 
109, 163, 165 
Johnson, Mrs. Toni . . . 
137 



Johnson, Yvette . 123 

Jones, Bobble 1 18 

Jones, Caria . 51, 123 

Jones, Dennis . . 43, 109 

Jones, Doug ... 41, 43, 

44, 102, 118 

Jones, Esther ... 130 

Jones, Jeff ... 76, 67, 13( 

Jones, Jerry ... 49 

Jones, Kandra . . . 33, 69, 

122 

Jones, Kerry . . 123 

(ones, Leia ... 130 

Jones, Michael ... 118 

lones, Pat ... 31, 49, 130 

Jones, Rodney . . .39, 44, 

123 

Jones, Steve ... 123 

Jones, Terry ... 123 

Jones, Theodore ... 123 

Jordan, Jeffrey . . 130 

Jordan, Jennifer ... 51, 

130 

Jordan, Yolanda . . . 53, 

69, 130 

kkk 



Kantor, Mr. Sheldon . . . 

74, 138 

Kassenbrock, Amy ... 32, 

13 

Keaton, Mrs. Willie . . . 

138 

Keith. John ... 123 

Keller. Devita ... 86 

Kelley. John .130 

Kendrick. Kim ... 130 

Kennan. Teddy ... 69 

Kennedy, Kevin ... 28, 86 

Kerner, Kim . . . 109 

Kersey, Mrs. Mary Jo . . . 

138 

Kidd. William ... 44, 123 

King. Courtney . . . 33. 34, 

35, 76, 118 

Kimsey, Allen ... 118 

King, Sherry ... 130 

Kirby, Mrs. Constance . . . 

138 

Kennedy, Kevin ... 118 

Klapper, Laurel ... 67, 71 

76, 123 



Knapp, Darrell . . i23 


Lawson, Jonda ... 109 


Knapp, Tom ... 33, 57, 


Lazar, Michael . . 13, 79. 


90, 101, 118 


89, 98, 99, 109 


Knox, Andrea . . 123 


Lee, Allen 28 


Knox, Nikki ... 118 


Lee, Andrea 123 


Koers, Mr. Patrick 28, 


Lee, Darren . 118 


29, 138, 166 


Lee, Mrs. Geraldlne . . . 


Krause, Karl ... 86, 118 


137 


Kurtz. Mrs. Marian .138 


Lee, Harem .130 


Kurt, William ... 123 


Lee, Ronald ... 45, 1 30 




Leflore, Melinda ... 118 


111 


Lenore, Bill 28, 33 


III 


Lenoir, William . . 49, 123 


M.M.M. 


Levi, Richard ... 130 




Level, Terry ... 130 




Lewis, Bynlta 123 


Lach. Tiffany ... 77, 123, 


Lewis, James .130 


167 


Lewis, Kim ... 33 


Lacy, J.A. 36, 60, 81, 


Lewis, Leon . 28, 49, 


96, 97, 100, 101, 118 


123 


Lacy, Laura ... 75, 118 


Lewis, Russell . . 33, 118 


Lacy. Mark 32. 49. 76, 


Ligen, John ... 33, 118 


130 


Lilly, Jeffrey ... 130 


Lahman. Mary ... 55, 60, 


Lindsay, Cecric ... 28, 29, 


64, 65, 101, 118 


38, 109 


Lake, Tracey . 86, 109 


Lindsay, Helenor ... 130 


Lake, Richard ... 123 


Lindsay, Leroy ... 130 


Lambert, Cathy .130 


Link, Dianne ... 65, 118, 


Lambert, Miss Shirley . . . 


167 


138 


Link, Mrs. Virginia ... 137 


Lamkin, Bill .109 


Little, Kelli ... 5, 60, 101 


Landers, Mark ... 34, 36, 


Little, Kelly .130 


118 


Lockwood, Lisa ... 56, 65, 


Langan, Miss Nancy . . . 


71, 76, 118 


138 


Logen, John ... 86, 130 


Latimore, Mrs. Carol . . . 


Lolla. Kormen . 86. 109 


138 


Lona, Laura ... 130 


Latimore. David ... 28, 


Long. Mary Beth . . 74, 


32. 33, 118 


118 


Latimore, Kim . . . 46, 123 


Long. Kimberly ... 91 


Laughlin, Elizabeth ... 79, 


Long, Stacy ... 123 


123 


Looper, Cheryl ... 1 18 


Law, Mike ... 28, 60, 65, 


Loos, Lucy .130 


109 


Love, Jenny ... 37, 50, 


Law. Nick .4. 28. 29. 


60, 118 


60, 65, 80, 98, 109 


Lowe, Kim ... 130 


Lawrence, Anya . . . 86, 


Lowry, John ... 49, 96 


109 


Loy, Leslie ... 118 



SURPRISE . . . Stopping to smile for the camera, 
Dennis Bland takes an unexpected break from 
writing his computer program on the terminal. 




Index/ 159 



X INDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEX INDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEX 



Loyd. Mrs. Shirley . . . 

134. 138 

Lucas. Mr. Jerry 138 

Lumpkins. Fred 44. 

123 

Lumpkins. Kenneth 31, 

123 

Luttrell. Mary 130 

Lutz. Sabrina 79. 99. 

130 

Lyman. Matt 78. 130 

Lynch. Jonathon 130 

mmm 



Madden. Esther 86. 

110 

Madden. Jeffrey 130 

Madden. Kevin 28. 32. 

33. 123 

Maddox. Jeff 64. 65. 

110 

Maddox. Sean 118 

Maggard. Mrs. Patricia 

89 

Mahoney. Carolyn . . 65. 

74. 75. 110 

Majors. Reginald ... 123 

Manawal. Violeta . 123 

Manson. Samuel 28 

Marks. Henry ... 123 

Marks. Michelle ... 66 

Maroney. Marsha .56 

Marshall. Cynthia 91 

Marshall. Vivian .96 

Marshall. William .91 

Martin. Caria . 130 

Martin. Donna . . 47, 123 

Martin. Kimberly .130 

Martin. Monica ... 89, 118 

Martin. Miss Phillis . . 

138 

Martin. Rosetta 8 

Martin. William . . 124 

Mason. Luther ... 31. 69 

Mason. Mauri ... 124 

Matthews. Heather 65. 

76. 101. 118 

Mattews. Michael ... 75 

Maxey, Kirt ... 79. 86. 

110 

Maxey. Sherry 98. 99. 

110 

Maxi. Curtis 28. 29. 

33. 74 

Maxwell. Anna 86 

Mayfield. Denise . 86. 

118 

Maxwell, Anna Marie 

110 

Mays. William 32. 33. 

48. 49. 50. 71, 79, 98, 99, 

110 

McBrady. Kim 76. 82. 

124 

McBuddy. Ronnie ... 86 

McCannons. April 90. 

130 

McCaslin. Mr. James . . . 

138 

McCauley. Mr. Donald 

95 

McCawley. Jenny 51. 

99. 130 

McClendon. Tanya . 110 

McClury. Janice . 124 

McCracken, Tonya 86 

McCracklin, Sandra 

53. 69. 124 

McCraw. Debra 124 

McCray. Denise 130 



McCurty. Benjamin 28. 

124 

McDaniels. Charlotta . 

130 

McDowell. Charles 130 

McDowell. Stephen 

130 

McEachern. Lisa 51, 

100. 118 

McGee. Jerome ... 115 
McGhee. Jeffrey ... 124 
McGill. Kevin . 69, 130 
McGlan. Tony . . 130 
McKeller. Fenton . . 110 
McKinnie. Darlene ... 118 
McManama. Mrs. Cheryl 

99, 138 
McMillan, Cheryl 86 

MclSally, Jennifer . . 110 
McNeal, Jermas . . . 32, 
33, 88, 130 

McQueen, Mark .38 
McVey. Mike 31. 130 

Meadows. Ben . . 32. 33. 
91. 124 
Meadows. Hannah . . . 72, 

101, 118 

Means, Roxanne . 67. 

90. 124 

Medaris. Robert . . 124 

Megucshar, Chris . . 31. 

77. 100, 130 

Mendel, Mark . . 124 

Merriweather. Charles . . . 

130 

Meyers. Hans ... 28. 110 

Mickel, Curtis ... 68, 69. 

110 

Middbrooks. Shamona . . . 

130 

Miles. Eva ... 124 

Miles. John ... 130 

Miles. Rosemary . . . 76. 

82. 124 

Milgate. Debbie ... 71. 99, 

130 

Miller, Crystal ... 4. 53. 

69. 86. 110 

Miller, Doug . 11, 56, 

57. 60. 65. 70, 97, 118, 

165 

Miller, Elaine . . 82. 118 

Miller, Keith . 69, 130 

Miller, Kent 28, 29, 32, 

33. 51. 110 

Miller, Mark 67, 70. 

97, 130 

Miller, Robert . 124 

Miller, Sandy .54, 60, 

97, 110, 165 

Miller, Shawndra 77, 

130 

Miller, Stan 94, 95, 

110 

Miller, Ted 86, 1 18 

Mills, Felecia 118 

Minks. James 69. 131 

Mitchell. Suzanne . . . 73. 

124 

Moffatt. Jenny 35. 60. 

64, 65, 97, 101, 118, 164 

Molzan, Karen 118 

Montgomery, Thurman 

28, 124 

Monger, Larry . 24, 36, 

50, 71, 75, 76. 79. 98. 99. 

110 

Moon. Marceia 118 

Moore. Debbie 69. 124 

Moore. Eddie 69 

Moore. Letina 33. 51. 

66. 124 

Moore. Pam 86 

Moore. Reggie 110 



Morgan. Phillip 118 

Moriarity. David . . 65, 

110 

Morris. Ian 86 

Morris. Janice . Ill 

Morrow. Lavonne . 124 

Morton. Darrell 119 

Mosely. Leonard 28. 

124 

Moss. Carole . Ill 

Moss. Terry . 119 

Moulton, Mrs. Christie . 

76, 138 

Mouser. Laura . 119 

Mowlin. Mary .69 

Moy. Canda . . 124 

Moy. Tonya 119 

Moye, Ella 124 

Murff, Michael ... 28, 29, 

38, 43, 86, 1 1 1 

Murphy, Chris ... 38 

Murphy, Darrion ... 124 

Murray, Patrick .44 

Murray, Trevor . . 28, 49. 

124 

Myers, William ... 68. 69. 

124 

nnn 



Nash, Franklin D . . 8 

Neff, Andrew . 79, 111 

Nelson. Leonard ... 31. 

131 

Nelson. Michael ... 131 

Neville, Regina ... 86. 

111. 131 

Newton, John ... 28, 33 

Nguyen, Dung ... 119 

Nichols. Netra ... 124 

Nicholson, Jonathon . . . 

124 

Noel. Chris ... 50. 69, 94, 

95, 124 

Northington, James . , . 

45, 131 

Northington. Wendy . . . 

131 

Nowling. Mary . . 53, 119 



Owsley, Louis 119 



PPP 



000 



Odom, Melzena . . 119 

Ohara, Colleen . . 131 

OKelley, Darryl ... 124 

OKelley, Gary ... 28 

Okey, Sean ... 119 

ONan, Mr. Edward .85. 

138 

Orban. Mr. Dick 28. 

31, 49 

Orban. Mrs. Linda . . 137 

Orban. Richie .31 

Osborn. Lisa 124 

Osborne. Patrice ... 124 

Osborne. Vicky . . Ill 

Ovelton. Karen . 77, 86, 

111 

Ovelton, Mrs. Barbara 

137 

Overstreet. George 119 

Overstreet. Kevin 119. 

131 

Overton. John 69 

Owens. Anthony 131 

Owens. Auldrey 131 

Owens, Mrs Lillian 

139 



Paepper. Tony 68 

Palenik. Mrs. Lynn 139 

Pappas. Tim 50. 100. 

101, 119 

Parker, Ed 28 

Parker, Robert . . 93, 131 

Parks. Jackie . . 124 

Parks. Staria . 131 

Parrish, Robert 69, 131 

Pate, Michael . 119 

Patrick, Mr. Barry . . 26, 

73, 139 

Patterson, Dan . 79, 80, 

94, 124 

Patterson, Deanne . . 119 

Patterson, Erin . . 68, 69, 

131 

Patton, Arnold ... 119 

Paugh, Kim .67. 124 

Paul, Mrs. Lucinda . . . 65, 

66 

Parrish, Burt .68 

Payne, April . . 119 

Payne. Tim .56. 64, 65, 

HI 

Payne, Mr. Thomas . . . 

139 

Pearson, Michael . . Ill 

Peeler, Tom ... 69, 75, 

76, 81. 119. 124 

Penick, Raemina ... 131 

Penrick, Yvette ... 86 

Perkins, Steve ... 131 

Perry, Orlando . . 131 

Perry, Reginald ... 89, 

111 

Perry, Stephanie . . . 66, 

99, 131 

Perry, Yvette ... 56, 76, 

94, 98, 99, 1 1 1 

Peters, Angela . . . 131 

Peters, John . 124 

Peterson, Deneen .86 

Petrie, Sandra ... 69. 76, 

99. 131 

Retry, Joe ... 124 

Pettrie, Angela ... 131 

Petty, Butch .38, 42. 

43. Ill 

Petty. Richard ... 28. 124 

Pickering, Jerry . 67. 

91, 131 

Pike, Kenny . . 119 

Pittman, Richard .31 

Pol, Victoria . 33, 119 

Poole. Clint . . 124 

Pope. Gary ... 38 

Pope. Joenne . . . 37. 70, 

71 100, 101, 124 

Porter, Bennie . 31, 131 

Porter, Bryant ... 1 19 

Porter, Lynn . 124 

Porter, Shellie . . 131 

Posey, Eric 31. 45. 

131 

Powe. Stephanie . . 74, 

81, 99, 119 

Powell, Corrina . 124 

Powell, Danny 28, 83, 

124 

Powers, Stephanie 37 

Price, Jenny 56 

Price, Nathan . 36, 77 

Price, Nick 124 

Price, Tina 66, 131 

Pryor, Charles 111 

Pugh, Sandra 37, 69 



Pullen, Ken ... 119 
Pullins, Pierre . . 1 19 
Pung. Mike 68 

Pugh, Tanya 33, 74, 

79, 97 



qqq 



Quarles, Elmer . 49, 

124 

Quarles, Michelle . . 124 



rrr 



Rabin, Joshua . 124 

Radford, Stacey . . . 56, 

111 

Rachel, Glenn ... 119 

Ramsey, Paul 1 19 

Ramsey, Paul . 80, 119 

Randall, David . Ill 

Randall, Mark ... 39 

Randolph. Lawrence . . . 

68, 69, 131 

Ranelin, Tracee . . 86, 97, 

99 

Rasdall, Dawn ... 89. 101. 

Ill 

Rasdell, Jerry . . 86. 119 

Ray. Mr. James . 94. 

139 

Ray, Latonia . 119 

Ray, Leslie ... 91 

Ray, Milton ... 124 

Ray, Wendell .32, 50, 

71, 79, 82, 98, 111 
Reaves. William ... 131 
Redd, Marta . . 98, 111 
Reed, John ... 119 
Reed, Sharon ... 86 
Reed, Travis ... 68, 69, 
124 

Reehling, Phil ... 69, 124 

Rees, Amy ... 75, 79, 124 

Reeves, Eric ... 112 

Reeves, Michael ... 91, 

119 

Reid, Angela . . 119 

Reid, Mike ... 31, 77, 131 

Reid, Noreita ... 68, 124 

Reid, Yvonne ... 76. 77. 

86. 99 

Reinsche. Mr. Tom . . 45, 

139 

Reives, James ... 131 

Rellen. Devita 119 

Resnover. Pamela ... 131 

Reynolds, Ben ... 1 19 

Reynolds, Sylvia 131 

Rhea. Michael 131 

Rice. Chuck 5 

Richard, Keith 10 

Richardson, Cordia 57, 

91, 119 

Richardson, Glenda . 

124 

Richardson, Lee . . 64, 

65, 119 

Richardson, Susan . 33, 

86, 112 

Ridpath, Jamie 68 

Riegel, Rachel .5, 69, 

72, 75 

Rief, Michelle 91, 99 

Riffel, Ronald 131 

Riggs, Helene . . 76, 98, 
110, 112 



Rigpath, Jamie . . . 131 

Ring, Mr. Gene ... 28, 139 

Rippy, Donna . 86, 1 12 

Roberts, David . . 28, 33, 

44, 124 

Roberts, Larry . 33, 119 

Robinson, Jetona ... 131 

Robinson, Shauna . . . 69, 

131 

Robinson, Sherwood 

44, 119 

Robinson, Shirley . . 124 

Roche, Beverly . 124 

Rodgers. Patty ... 119 

Roettger, Sally ... 65, 72, 

81, 124 

Roole, Sarah 67, 124 

Romeiser, Mrs. Barbara 

. 137 

Rose, Ellis . . 44, 124 

Rose, Lana . 50, 76, 99, 

119 

Rose, Lisa . 13. 56 

Rose, Vicky ... 79, 98, 

112 

Rosebrock, Lori . . . 54, 64, 

65, 94, 98. 112 

Ross. Byron 86, 119 

Roth, Maya 60, 65, 71, 

76, 80, 81, 84, 94 

Roush, Leslie . 124 

Rowland. Mike ... 28 

Royle. Keenam ... 125 

Rugh. Mike . 119 

Rumpell. Wendy 86, 

112 

Rush, Linda ... 119 

Russell, Cecil ... 119 



sss 



SaluppKj, Dee Dee . . 91, 

120 

Samson, John .69 

Sandaes, Evelyn 57 

Sanders, Regina 46, 

50, 112 

Sanders, Ronald . . 28. 

86, 120 

Sanders, Shunte . . 131 

Sunders, Tammy . . 93, 

120 

Sanders, Tangela 86, 

120 

Sarner. Chris ... 120 

Saulsberry, Alesia . 70, 

91, 125 

Saulsberry, Mary 125 

Scales, Terry 70, 120 

Schuck, James 13, 69, 

98, 113 

Schuder, Karen 120 

Schurtz, Mary 131 

Scisney, Dana . . 125 

Scruggs, Giovanni 132 

Segal, Mr. Elliot 28, 

31, 38, 46, 80, 139 

Seigers, Ms. Joyce 33 

Seldon, Mr. Nicholas 

139 

Senior, Amy 119 

Session, Sherry 113 

Settles, Nia . . 125 

Shackleford, Betsy 113 

Sharp, Quinton 43, 

113 

Sharp, Sharon 125 

Sharp, Sheila 89, 125 

Sharpe, Bruce 120 

Sharpe, Sara 113 

Sharpley, Philip . . 64, 

65, 101, 113 



160/ Index 



(DEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDEXINDE) 



Shaw, Kelly ... 125 

Shepherd. Eric ... 28, 125 

Shelpard, Lisa ... 33, 120 

Sherels, Jeffrey ... 31, 45 

132 

Sheridan. Dawn ... 113 

Sheriff, Greg ... 38, 43, 

113 

Sherman, Mike ... 28, 39 

97, 125 

Sherrel, Janet ... 53, 69, 

86, 120 

Sherrell, Janice ... 69, 86 

Shields. Andrea ... 120 

Shields, Laurita . . 89, 

113 

Shoupe, Jenny . . . 24, 32, 

33, 132 

Showalter, Susan . . . 67, 

94, 125 

Shy, Dana ... 86 

Sides, Steve ... 132 

Sidex, Tracy ... 125 

Siegel, Mrs. Mary ... 139 

Simpson, Alfonzo . 28, 

125 

Sima, Karen ... 125 

Sirka. Mr. William ... 139 

Shipley, Hal 120 

Skinner, Stephanie 57, 

81, 94, 97, 125 

Slack, Kelly ... 69, 132 

Slaughter, Tommy . . 45, 

113 

Sluder, Denise ... 66, 132 

Small, Mike ... 125 

Smiley, Keith ... 113 

Smith, Aaron . . . 31, 132 

Smith, Andrew . . 86, 12C 

Smith, Sgt. Aratha ... 137 

Smith, Bryan . . . 125 

Smith, Dean ... 132 

Smith, Diedre ... 86, 120 

Smith, Donna E . . 79, 

113 

Smith. Donna R ... 69, 

86, 98, 113 

Smith, Elicia ... 125 

Smith, Gregory ... 132 

Smith, Jackie ... 86 

Smith, James ... 120 

Smith, John ... 68, 125 

Smith, Larhonda 125 

Smith, Margie . 125 

Smith, Marilyn . . 120 

Smith, Mr. Marvin ... 139 

Smith, Michele . 125 

Smith, Nobel . . 68. 69 

Smith, Rhonda ... 113 

Smith, Sharon ... 125 

Smith, Sherida ... 91 

Smith, Stanley ... 10, 65, 

75, 97, 101. 113 

Smith. Vivian . . 86, 113 

Smith, Mr. William .43 

Smith, William . . 132 

Snobarass, Mick . . 120 

Snyder, Todd ... 55, 85, 

120 

Sommers, Brett 25. 

41. 65. 113. 164 

Spain, Otham ... 113 

Speares, Madene . . 81. 

132 

Spine. Thomas ... 125 

Spivey. Sherri . 132 

Spudic, Courtney . . 50, 

56, 62. 63. 64, 65. 113 

Stahl, Kathy . 13, 98, 

113 



Stallworth, Pamela . . 79. 

98, 114 

Stamper, Jesse .49 

Staten, Steve ... 132 

Steele, Gary ... 10. 28, 

60, 64. 65. 98, 114 

Steele, Scott 14, 28, 

98, 103, 114 

Steen, Goldie ... 132 

Stein, Bridgett ... 32, 33, 

120 

Stevens, Kevin . . 120 

Stevens, Scott ... 36, 60, 

79, 102, 114 

Stevens, Sherman . . . 68, 

69, 132 

Stevenson. Marion . . 114 

Stevenson. Troy . . 125 

Steward. Lisa .69 

Stewart. Kim ... 125 

Stewart. Lisa ... 99. 132 

Stewart. Sgt. Norman . . . 

139 

Stewart. Shannon .68 

Stokes. James . . 132 

Stokes. Tanya ... 79 

Stone. Ron . . 74, 1 14 

Stone, Veronica ... 120 

Stout, Stephanie ... 120 

Stotler, Angela . . 60, 65, 

114 

Stratton, Carta .86, 99, 

101 

Strong, Antonio ... 120 

Stubbs, Earl ... 132 

Stubbs, Gen ... 46 

Swatts, Tracey ... 5, 56, 

75, 79, 114 



ttt 



Talbott, Susie ... 50, 64, 

70, 76, 120 

Tarver, Deana ... 132 

Tate, Cynthia ... 125 

Tate, Dennis ... 33, 38, 

120 

Taylor, Albertina . . . 79, 

99, 114 

Taylor, Belinda ... 86 

Taylor, Chris ... 125 

Taylor, Darryl ... 67, 125 

Taylor, Marsha ... 125 

Taylor, Mary . 25, 46, 

86, 120 

Taylor, Sandra . . . 53, 69, 

124 

Taylor, Thomas ... 125 

Taylor, Willie ... 132 

Teague, Melvin ... 132 

Teeters, Tonia ... 125 

Terrel, June ... 114 

Terrell, Ronald ... 125 

Terry, William ... 74, 114 

Thomas, Amy ... 125 

Thomas, Charles ... 125 

Thomas, Latonya ... 132 

Thomas, Patricia . . . 132 

Thomas, Robert . . 31, 

46, 132 

Thomas, Tyrone . 132 

Thompson. Ernest . 114 

Thorman. Rich .89 

Thurman, Rhonda . 120 

Tiggs. Clem 132 

Tiggs. Tonya 125 



CHAOTIC CROWDS . . . Cheering to the beat of 
the Jazz Band, BR fans roar support for the 
basketball team. 



Tobey. Taucsha . . . 66. 

68, 132 

Todd, Maria . 76, 99, 

120 

Todd, Miss Phyllis ... 32, 

46, 47, 139 

Tolbert, Kathy ... 114 

Tolbert, Robert ... 125 

Toles, Celestine ... 132 

Toles, Dana ... 31, 45, 

132 

Toles, Marea 65, 125 

Tompkins. Donna . . 125 

Toran. Derrick . . 28, 42, 

43, 120 

Torke, Mrs. Christine . . . 

139 

Towe, Patty ... 132 

Trabue, Mr. Robert . . . 

139 

Trammer, Barbara ... 126 

Traugott, David ... 132 

Tremain, Mr. John , . . 28, 

29, 38, 49 

Trottman, Mark . . . 67, 

132 

Truong, Mang ... 114 

Tucker, Dale ... 120 

Tucker, Renee ... 126 

Tuggle, Michael ... 114 

Tuggles, Lisa . . . 47, 126 

Tuggles, Nathan ... 31, 

49, 120 

Turientine, Carman ... 86 

Turner, Berlynne . . . 65, 

70, 114 

Turner, Danny ... 120 

Turner, Greg . . . 132 

Turner, Mikell ... 126 

Turner, Natilie . . . 47, 66, 

132 

Turner, Shawn ... 114 

Turner, Valerie ... 86, 120 

Tyler, Yvette ... 66, 132 

Tyson, Charles ... 31, 132 



uuu 



CJrsino, Patricia . . . 53. 69, 
74, 76, 97, 126 

vvv 



Vahle, Jay ... 45, 68, 132 
Vail, Heidi ... 114 
Vail, Rebecca ... 132 
Vale, Kelly ... 65, 126 
Valentine, Ansly . . . 72, 



81, 132 

Valentine, Ms. Patricia . . . 

139 

Vandever, Jackie . . . 120 

Van Dyke, Lorine ... 126 

Van Horn, Rodney . . 91, 

120. 126 

Van Hoy. Miss Linda . 

139 

Vargo. Miss Barbara 

98. 139 

Verplank. Miss Janice . . . 

46. 47. 139 

Viar. Linda . . 126 

Vinsen. Keith . 120 

Vinson, Kevin ... 86, 120 

Voelker, Kris .69. 94, 

132 

Vu, Tuyet ... 98 

WWW 



Wadlington, James 

132 

Wagner, Andrea ... 114 

Wagner, Sonya . . . 99, 

126 

Wagner, Tasha ... 79 

Walker, Cherri ... 86, 132 

Walker, Eric . . 126 

Walker, J.C. ... 60, 102, 

114 

Walker, Mark ... 126 

Walker, Ned ... 31, 132 

Walker, Norris ... 115 

Walker, Renee ... 126 

Walters, Mrs. Marthana 

... 139 

Wallace, Mosi . . . 44„ 126 

Walton, Christopher . . . 

126 

Walton, Ken ... 126 

Ward, Caria ... 86 

Ward, Marcus ... 132 

Warfield, Ramone ... 126 

Warr, Rageing ... 126 

Warren, Angela . . . 86, 

115 

Warren, Charmel . . . 86, 

91, 120 

Washington, Beneva . . . 

132 

Washington. Charles . . . 

126 

Washington. Donna . . . 82, 

115 

Washington. Janice . . . 

132 

Washington, Kenneth . . . 

67, 126 



Washington, Lonnie . . . 

132 

Watson, Lisa ... 115 

Watts, Angela . . 74, 120 

Watts, Charlie .10 

Watts, Harry . 75, 120 

Watts, Sharon ... 115 

Waycott, Hunt .56, 60, 

65, 102, 120 

Webb, Lori ... 1 20 

Webb, Melissa .86 

Webb, Mrs. Ruth . . 139 

Webster, Lonnie .45 

Webster, Mark . . 28, 120 

Wehr, Deborah . . 74, 126 

Weichert, Amy ... 50, 94, 

101, 126 

Weichert, Brian . . 120 

Welcher, Linda . . . 66, 

101, 132 

Wells, Dawn ... 51. 67, 

100, 126 

Wells, Derrick ... 69, 91, 

126 

Wells, Eric ... 28, 86, 120 

Wells, Kevin ... 67, 132 

Wells, Melissa ... 120 

West, Janice ... 90, 115 

West, Theresa ... 126 

Whitfield, Caron ... 120 

Whitfield, George ... 132 

Whitaker, Tracy ... 93, 

99, 126 

White, Miss Evelyn . . . 

139 

White, Faleasha . . 115 

White, Kim ... 99, 115 

White, Liz ... 5, 61 

Whitehouse, Derek . . . 67, 

126 

*ilburn, Antrawn . . . 30, 

31, 45, 132 

Wiley, Betsi ... 5, 81, 87, 

126 

Williams, Brian ... 28, 

120 

Williams, CarIa ... 53, 69, 

99, 120, 126 

Williams, Charita ... 86, 

120 

Williams, Eric ... 29, 51, 

115 

Williams, India .26 

Williams, Linda ... 132 

Williams, Lisa ... 115 

Williams, Lori ... 78. 79. 

98. 115 

Williams. Mariel .86 

Williams. Marselle ... 120 

Williams, Obble ... 28, 44, 

126 

Williams, Sherry ... 115 

Williamson, Neil ... 79, 




126 

Wills, Shelly ... 120 

Wilson, Mrs. Alyce . . 75, 

139 

Wilson, Beth . . 71, 126 

Wilson, Mrs. Corri . . . 74, 

139 

Wilson, Fred ... 132 

Wilson, James ... 126 

Wilson, Kelly ... 126 

Winkler, Amy . . 120 

Winn, John . 120 

Wisdom, Patrick ... 10, 

56, 60, 65, 71, 75, 115 

Wise, Jeff . 74, 120 

Wolf, Mrs. Jo . . . 139 

Wolf, Miss Sylvia ... 139 

Wolfe, Mark ... 31, 132 

Womack, Maurice ... 38 

Wood, Chris . . 120 

Wood, Ron . . 10 

Woodall, Tom . . 132 

Woodley, Tonda ... 115 

Woods, Alicia ... 76, 77, 

79, 99, 102, 115 

Woods, Gregory ... 126 

Woods, Indria ... 53, 69, 

126 

Woodson, Billy ... 44, 126 

Woody, Mr. John ... 32 

Woolsey, Jamie ... 66 

Woyna, Jessica . . . 65, 

115 

Wright, David ... 132 

Wright, Maria . . 126 

Wright, Sherry ... 120 

Wynn, Denise . . . 26, 27, 

50, 56, 99, 101, 115 

Wynn, Mr. Michael . . . 

139 

Wynn, Walter ... 132 



yyy 



Yates, John ... 126 

Yelladay, Doretha . . 132 

Yelladay, Steven . . 91, 

120 

Yelladay, Vincent .91 

Yelle, Richard ... 126 

Yeu, Leon ... 126 

Young, Delx>rah ... 86, 

89, 115 

Young, Mrs. Doris . . . 56, 

81. 139 

Young, Emily ... 24, 86, 

120 

Young, Kim ... 47 

Young, Melanle ... 126, 



ZIffrin, Sherri 
Ziffrin, Tom 



. 132 
132 



Index/ 161 



PATRONSPATRONSPATRONSPATRONSPATRONSPATRONSPATRONSPATROr 



BETH: No words will ever express 10. Or 

BStJ. Or 2 years of Yearbook Editorship, 

except maybe . . . I'm still not sure why 

we did it! (P.S. Do you have a GQ?) 

You're the best friend ever! Sue. 

Courtney: To Bee or not to BEE?!? Let's 

go shoe shopping, if all else fails: 

CALIFORNIA Here We Come!!!Love. 

Coore. 

Sue — Marilou Potter is watching you! 

"P" + "H" We Love you!! Court & Coore 

inc ... 

NASSAU — All the way to MSA!! 

Beth & Court — corn cobs 4-ever! 

Jenny and Amy Happy Activing! TOOT 

love, Jenny, Mary, Ann. 

Jodi, I'm glad you were my daughter. 

QTPi love, Lee. 

Special thanks to the humanities staff for 

a super job. 

Stacey — Remember Paul Harris parking 

lot. 

Kim — I bet you'll never ride home with 

us again! 

QTPi Prep-hater — have a fun summer, 

QTPi preplover. 

Here we come class of 83!!! Watch for big 

Nise and Chri. 

Mary & Peggy — Willard Wildcats. TOOT, 

Sr. High, Eggplant. 

Food Emporium, Older MEN . . . Friends 

J & T. 

In memory of DEE-VENUS 9-20-81, 3:20 

a.m. 

Jenny, Mary, and Ann, you guys are 

great. Love lil TOOT Jen. 

LEE and LOU, Its been a great FOUR 

years — Love KAY. 

G.Q. & Waydilk, thanx for a great Jr. 

year. Love Lee. 

To my little Tis-A-Baby!! scratch, scratch. 

Dawn, isn't this nasty! Mike, J.J. 

KEETON, worried talks. Summertimes, 

Florida, KEET. 

K — You've been a great best friend — 

thanks for being there. Love Jenny 

99, opals love and hope that's what we 

have together and always will! I love you 

always Mattew, LUV D.L. 

BETH: I hate Audrey . . . Mary Benedict 

is an ICE MONKEY. (Let's go to Big Red) 

Susan — GCJYS! GUYS!! GUYS!! Cindy. 

Michelle, it's been a great year! Jenny. 

Hey, Sandra Kaye, don't point in here 

outside the car . . . oops! it hit the 

window luv, Baby Dawn. 

Jill: Remember the silverdome, "SQUEAK 

SQUEAK". 

Andy — "You're my Babe ", Love, Cindy. 

M. Wynn, Thanks for everything — C.B. 

Richard, I will always love you . . . 

Sharon. 

"82" — Wild and Crazy Class, Good Luck 

Slim (s.b.) 

Michael C. Murff — It has been a great 



SIDE EFFECTS As part of the attractions 

at the Indiana State Fair, side shows featured 
advertising billboards. 



pleasure knowing you — Love forever, 

Monica D. Bryant. 

PS. Lady Murff '80-81 " 

Lori, what happened? We were the best of 

friends — or were we? To Life, Love, and 

Laughter . . . Jenny. 

Colleeeeeeen . . . Wake up! Love, Tara 

and Peggy. 

"83" the class with class. Hi — R. 

Arnold, J. Clemmons, K. Collins, E. 

Guthrie, T. Johnson, C. King (porno), T. 

Ranelin. From T. Pugh. 

Tara — you devil-lover you — Jenny. 

Beth, how about another psychological 

chat? Kim. 

Good Luck to the class of 1982: Corrie 

Wilson. 

Best Wishes to the 1982 Grads — 

Humanities Staff. 

Jen — A great little TOOT, Luv, Lori and 

Mary B. 

Lookin Pu Nub . . . But wait I'm sensitive. 

Good Luck to the SSPA students, Barry 

Patrick. 

Beth and Scott: To all our secret meetings 

at B.C. Cathy. 

Scott, how's the Cucumber? 

Yearbook is like knocking your head 

against a wall — it feels so good when 

you stop. 

Dawn, you're a great buddy, ha ha, Love, 

Joenne. 

D.J, McDonald's, biking, oral hygiene, 

Glendale, beautious, Blec, orbit, blammo, 

grocery carts, nerf ball, walkin in the rain 

— it was real. 

Class of "82", we love you!! 

Pizza Castle — Future, Obvious, Jana, 

ZeroBoys. 

Chris Noel — Once you have it, you 

never lose it! Amy. 

To Amy, Chris, Kris — Thanx for being 

good friends — Sue S. 



Hi, Cathy, my North Central buddie. Luv 

William. 

Noodlecrotch!! 

HUNTLEY — Has it been a great year or 

what?? OR WHAT? Lets keep up the good 

work O.K? . . . O.K.O.K., LUV, SANDY. 

Cheers to Senior Jacuzzi parties. Junior 

bathtub parties. Who said that? BLOW IT 

OFF. Cast parties. Sandbar fiascos, 

Marvin and his Rabbits. QTPi, TOOT, 

BMF, BRED. FYDD. N.A.W.A.. 

relationships, rumors, fights, senior 

pranks, CHUCKIE IN THE BUFF! 

friendships, snarles, late nights together, 

study groups?, passion. M&M's. D&D, 

private jokes, drama conferences, the 

VAN, yearbook. It's 3 a.m. and we're still 

at the school board!!, and all the other 

memories assoicated with the "CLASS" of 

1982!!!!! so long and GOOD luck!!!! 

MIKEE, SANDY, DOUG, BETH, SUE & 

TIM ... all experienced burglars! 

Joenney Head, thanx for being my friend. 

Luv, Dawn Wawn. 

Mike, let's have a private party. I love 

you. Amy. 

Good Luck, Super Class of 1982! Jeanne 

and Bill Appel. 

Maw — I'll always care — I love you — 

Ses. 

MBL — I'll miss you — maybe I'll visit 

I.U. — take care. Ses. 

Friends since 2nd — 2 yrs. 2 go! Crazy 4 

ever! Susan. 

Thanks and best wishes to Riparian Echo 

and Riparian senior staffers: S. Appel, M. 

Dorsey, D. Engleking, A. Fauteck. L. 

Grimes, K. Henderson, B. Hill, M. James, 

T. Johnson, N. Law, S. Miller, S. Miller. Y. 

Perry. L. Rosebrock. S. Smith. B. 

Sommers — J. Ray. 

Heidi — Watch out for the wild Muncie 

Maniac — Mimi. 



"G/: 



DRUG 



FREAKS 



162/ Patrons 



;PATRONSPATRONSPATRONSPATRONSPATRONSPATRONSPATRONSPATROr 



Tara and Peggy — thanks for all you 

help! You're great — Col. 

Vinyl Hats forever! 

Chi-Chi's, running, & driving my car. I'll 

miss you Jen, Luv, Mary B. 

Jenny — told any stories lately? — Tara. 

Tim, Sandbar, Physics, Garfield, you've 

made this year special . . . Love, Ann. 

Sally, Denise, Chelle, Amy — Much QTPi 

Love — F.F., Jenni. 

Cooreman — the last of the South Bend 

Preppies. 

Much happiness at B.R. The Pop>es. 

C.P., I'm so glad we met this year. You'll 

always be special to me. Love, J.M. 

Mooooooooooooooooooo! Heidi! (oom) 

Thanks a bunch, William, Stan, Kathy, 

Kim, Donna, Vicky, & Deanna, Good luck 

always, Mrs. Burnett — Mrs. Johnson. 

Ann — You made this year a very special 

one for me, I love you. Tim 

82 — THE CLASS with class. 

BGBBY: I know we'll be Bubs's forever 

and ever!!!! I love you more than I can 

say! Forever, Beth. 

Sue: You're the best friend anyone could 

ask for 1 can honestly say that I wouldn't 

want to go through Ball State and IG with 

anyone else!! 1 can't believe that someday 

we'll look back on this and laugh!! Please 

RMA, Your Institute pal, Beth. 

Chuck — Let's do our chemistry 

homework — Tara. 

Jim — Where'd you get those cool skis? 

— Josie Aspen. 

To my swineheart: You're the oinkle one. 

Lots of nose licks: me. 

Good Luck in your future endeavors: P&P 

Briscoe. G. Anderson, J. Deffendall, Z. 

Fitzgerald, M. Jessup (Gonzo) (gonzo), D. 

Rasdall, D. Smith, S. Smith. RMA, T. 

Pugh. 

Hasler — You leecher! — signed Harlot. 

Yeah, Libby! Love Joenne and Susan. 

Optimism . . . Peggy . . . Optimism. 

Jenny — You devil-lover you — Tara. 

TOOT New Years Eve! 1983?? 

T.L.D.L. You're great big TOOTs. Love, 

Sab. 

Dear Dianne, through the year of '82, I 

will keep on loving you! Matt. 

Sandy, a few more nights in the darkroom 

until 3 in the morning and a few things 

other than those internegatives could 

develop if you leave it long enough. Love, 

Mike 

Mikee, our long DARK nights are about to 

end but even as the lights go on ... so 

do the memories of what might have 

been, Sandy! P.S., Do you know where 

the children are? Hey, S&M forever. 

Right? 

Dawn wanna buy a patron?!! — Amy. 

Susannah — "Friends Forever" — QTPi 

cindy. 

IH.L. — To a real Sweetie", Love, C.B. 



Pizza Hut, Charlie's Angels, streaking, ST- 
OP, bathing suits and bongos. The Strip, 
vroooom, yip, yip, yip, yahoo — The 
Unique Jammin' Three. 
Hey Amy 1 could hardly afford this 
patron. You better appreciate it — Dawn. 
Cindy — You're a great mom! QTpi love, 
Susannah. 

Kristi — Take off you HOSEHEAD — 
Dawn W. 

TooTooTooTooTooTooTooTooTooTooT. 
Debby, We wish we could have had you 
longer!! You were a great little Toot!! 
Remember us always, Denise and Beth. 
Hi, Heidi . . . WWW from your slothy 
friend. 
Denise — AYR, Discoing, Farrels, different 

— "Claire". 

D.B., best friends never forget each other. 

Love, A.F. 

Best Wishes to the 1982 Grads. 

Riparian is the best! 

Good luck in 1982 — Jo Wolf 

Rainbow, Soldiers, Unicorns, and high 

hopes — our lives. 

Best wishes to the class of 1982. 

Dawn — caught any good Buzzes lately? 

Brett — Let's go to Brown Co. sometime 

— Love Shannon. 
Eggplant — It's a delicacy. 

Scott — Mr. Perfect (Ha!). Ripples '81?? 

How about August 14 . . . Purdue, Phone 

Bills, Labor Day Weekend, Sweet Tarts, 

Well it's almost one year!! 1 Love You!! 

Dong - Ooops I mean Dawn! 

Susan, ????????!!!!! GOVT????!!!!???? Brett, 

Brett, ????????!!!!! GOVT????!!!!???? Sue. 

MACO, Wanna Buy some lift tickets? 

Brett and Shannon. 

Sue, May the moo god always watch over 

you, mushrooms, janitorial music. Oh 

John !!? Chocolate milk forever!!! HEIDI. 

Court — It's OVER!!!! Love, Coore. 

Shannon — Third times a charm. Love, 

Brett. 

Beth and Court — CORN COBS 4- 

ever!!!!!!!! 

LISA C. Missed you lots! Beth. 

Susan G., you're a great friend. Luv, 

Patricia. 

Good Luck, Class of '84. Yolanda Allen. 

Take off all you Hosers — Bob, Doug, 

and Tom. 

Steve, you mean so much to me. Love, 

Jenni. 

Hi! Kim — Boggle and pizza forever! 

Love, Beth. 

Once you've had cake, BRED doesn't 

satisfy. 

BRED always rises to the occasion!!! 

AF — Germerican Friends Always! Love 

ya, only me. 

SU lots of fun n' memre's too: Love them 

pigs frm u no wo. 

Chicago — 83? Maybe not! 

Hey Joe, I'll love you always. Sally. 




OP CHOCK . . . Joking around in advanced 
biology class, Charles T. Johnson (Tim) 
demonstrates the lighter side of disection. 



Staffers: Remember . . . the crafty fifth- 
hour visitor who left us fond memories 
but no wallets; Coke cans scattered here 
& there — where did they all come 
from?; Late night burglaries; numerous 
lost and misplaced negatives; where are 
the pica poles, croppers, grease pencils, 
etc.?; S & M in the darkroom; Beth's 
cowboy boots and Doug's mildewed pants; 
the overflowing ad section; Stan's creative 
cheerleading pix; color division pages 
$$$$; Sarah's Beauty Parlor (blush, brush, 
mirror, eyeshadow . . . ) Julius Dobbins, 
Jr.; Doug's rendezvous with the night 
watchman; Tim's spring cleaning; highway 
pix; Where's Santa Claus?; Sue's vitamen 
C; Jenny: take a walk on the wild side; 
Jeff and Mike's cutlines; J im Durre tt's 
ty ping; the still in back and the pool 
across; GJR; a budget deficit bigger than 
Reagan's; Is soccer done? ... IS 
ANYTHING DONE? It was fun while it 
lasted, will it ever end? Eds. 



Patrons/ 163 



Where's the yearbook?. . Well, it's like this 



It all began in Gay Paris, 
with Tim frolicking around 
after French filles while Sue 
and Beth sparred with Mary 
Bennedict at ICJ. Two weeks 
later, Tim was still frolicking 
and Sandy was sweeping 
photo awards at BSG. 

And so summer died away 
and all returned "home" to 
beloved room 225. Beth, 
Sandy, Sue, Doug, Peggy, 
Jenny and Tara came armed 
with layouts, grease pencils, 
and ad contracts — Tim 
supplied the imported wine 
and cheese. 

When we'd left school last 
year, everything had been 
normal. Yet when we 
returned, we realized we had 
a new adviser, two schools in 
one building, inflation, a 
budding (?) ads section, a 
diminishing staff, and, as 
usual, mass confusion. 

So the year progressed, 
even though the book didn't, 
and we fought our way 
through missed deadlines 
(what's a deadline?), color 
pictures (cropping — 
courtesy of Beth and Sue), 
the Merle Norman ninth-hour 
clinic, and stampedes of 
anxious book-buyers. 



Gradually we got into the 
swing of things and started to 
get down to business . . 
about mid-February. Our 
previous year of editorship 
and weeks of preparation had 
not braced us for lost 
negatives, elaborate excuses, 
chewed and mangled pica 
poles, mysterious phone calls, 
and frequent bouts of 
insanity. 

Our theme was A 
WINNING COMBINATION, 
and with the help of our 
adviser; our cheerful 
representative, who always 
got us back on the wagon, 
and our staff (this does not 
apply to those of you who 
did not finish your spreads!!!), 
it was a good year. Special 
thanks to the NHS who 
generously furnished us with 

COLOPHON 



our daily allowance of 
caffeine, our friendly, 
inquisitive security guard, and 
the avidly supportive pupils. 
Briefly, a few memories to 
contemplate: mysterious 
patrons; stolen cookies; 
newspapers on the windows; 
visits by Mr. B.; those darn 
negatives; those infamous 
spreads — Service Clubs, 
Girls' Sports, Soccer, Musical, 
School Closings, etc.; whose 
doing Senior Section?; Just 
dropping in Doug?; where's 
my *#!@*! pica pole?; song 
and dance by D & B; the 
disappearing type book; the 
fermenting freezer; Ship Hips; 
threatening notices from the 
plant; S & T indexing 
evenings; where are the other 
300 students?; free candy; T 
and S on 1-465; our 



mysterious 5th editor; 4-pica 
gutters; Jeff's wonderful 
cutlines can't be beaten (off?); 
PARTY!!!; will we get a Big E 
award?; It's a boy?!?! 

So we burned the midnight 
tallows and the book is done 
(sort of). It looked so good on 
paper, but will we ever get it 
in our grubby little hands? 
Maybe by 1992! 

PS — Anyone want to buy 
an ad? 




Volume 57 of the Riparian yearbook was printed by 
Josten's/ American Yearbook Company. Six hundred 
copies of the 168page book were printed on 80-pound 
matte finish paper with black ink. 

The logo was designed by Susan Appel and Beth 
Hill, and the cover was created by Susan Appel, Beth 
Hill and Tim Johnson. Covered with American 
Embossed maroon Fabrikoid, the book had a gold foil 
applied front and an embossed spine. The grain on the 
cover was #1257 Spanish grain and the endsheets 



were lOOpound sand. 

The book contained four pages of full-color and 23 
pages of second color. All two-point tool lines were set 
by Josten's. 

Korrina was selected for the type — lOpoint for 
body copy and page folios, B-fXjint for captions, 
patrons, liners and index, 8-point bold for caption 
kickers. Thirty-point Korinna was used for headlines 
and 18-point bold for sub-headlines. Windsor outline 
was used for opening and closing spreads. 




164/ Acknowledgements 



r 



1982 RIPARIAN STAFF 



Editors-in-chief Susan App)el 

Beth Hill 
Tim Johnson 

Photo Editor Sandy Miller 

Section Heads Peggy Calkins 

Tara Jackson 

Mike Johnson 

Doug Miller 

Jenny Moffatt 

Student Life Allen Johnson 

Maya Roth 

Sports Dawn Cooreman 

Mark Dorsey 

Jim Durrett 

Susan Glunt 

Jeff Jackson 

J. A. Lacy 

Tanya Pugh 

Tracee Ranelin 

Mike Sherman 

Patricia Ursino 

Amy Weichert 

Activities Steve Badger 

Jenni BIgham 

Beth Buddenbaum 

Dawn Cooreman 

Mark Dorsey 

Jim Durrett 

Amy Essenberg 

Michelle Essenberg 

Annette Fauteck 

Heidi Fledderjohn 

Mimi Gatens 

Laurel Klapper 

J. A. Lacy 

Mark Miller 

Tanya Pugh 

Tracie Ranelin 

Maya Roth 

Amy Weichert 

Dawn Wells 



Album Susan Ap(>el 

Jenni Bigham 

Beth Buddenbaum 

Amy Essenberg 

Michelle Essenberg 

Faculty Susan Apf>el 

Peggy Calkins 
Beth Hill 

Photo Staff Denise Adams 

Beth Buddenbaum 

Chris Cassell 

David Engelking 

Mimi Gatens 

Mike Johnson 

Mick Law 

Sandy Miller 

Stan Miller 

Tanya Pugh 

Brett Sommers 

Amy Weichert 

General Staff Chris Barnhart 

Mike Dooley 

Jenny Foley 

Sarah Harvey 

Kelli Little 

Jenny McCawley 

Stephanie Skinner 

Linda Welcher 

Special Photographers Mr. Robert Austin 

Mr. Leonard Hasler 

Prestige Photographers 

Mrs. Julie VanCItt 

Mr. Bill Young 

Ads Tara Jackson 

Logo Design Susan Appel 

Beth Hill 

Cover Design Susan Appel 

Beth Hill 
Tim Johnson 

Representative Mr. Dick Maurer 

Adviser Mr. James Ray 



^PHOTO CREDITS^ 

Denise Adams; 72, 73 ' Mr. 
Robert Austin: 60, 61 ' Beth 
Buddenbaum: 86, 87 ' Chris 
Cassell: 4, 5, 112, 137, 164, 164, 
168 • Jim Durrett: 80, 81 • David 
Engelking: 34, 35, 74, 75 * Mimi 
Gatens: 23, 58, 59 ' Mr. Leonard 
Hasler: 62, 63 * Beth Hill: 6, 7 • 
Mike Johnson: 3, 10, 11, 16, 24, 
25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 36, 
37, 42, 43, 44, 45, 53, 70, 71, 76, 
77, 82, 83, 94, 96, 97, 165 • Nick 
Law: 14, 116 ' Sandy Miller; 2, 3, 
4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 
15, 17, 20, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 
30, 31, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 
44, 50, 51, 52, 53. 54, 55, 56, 57, 
64, 65, 74, 75, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 

85, 90, 98, 99, 102, 103, 105, 
131, 134, 140, 141, 144, 145, 
146, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 
161, 162, 163, 166, 167 * Stan 
Miller: 3, 4, 8, 9, 15, 24, 25, 26, 
27 • Tanya Pugh; 48, 49, 78, 79 • 
Prestige Photographers: 10, 11, 

50, 51, 68, 69, 74, 75, 76, 84, 85, 

86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 94, 95, 95, 
97, 134, 135 • Brett Sommers: 
12, 16, 17, 56, 57, 76 * Mrs. Julie 
VanUtt: 167 • Amy Weichert: 50, 

51, 66, 67, 92, 93, 96, 97 • Mr. 
Bill Young: 6, 7 




Acknowledgements/ 165 




166/Closing 





FIT FOR A KING . . . After a hectic 
day of rides and fun, Dianne Link 
and Matt Altaean take time out for a 
quiet moment at the top of the 
King's Island Eiffel Tower. 

FORTY WINKS . . . Taking a quick 
but relaxing break, a workman 
snoozes on some plywood before 
continuing his work in the darKe 
studio. 




Ripple emerges with new spirit 



Nobody really noticed 
anymore. The change had 
occurred while we weren't 
watching. The rough, raw 
edges that at the beginning or 
the year had chafed everyone 
were now healed. A rebirth 
had taken place and Broad 
Ripple emerged flexing its 
muscles. 

Flipping back through the 
pages of the 1981-82 
yearbook, faces and emotions 
caught by the flashbulb told 
the stories of the year. It was 
more than just a year of 
sports or plays or 



publications. Behind every 
event dwelled a myriad of 
individual student 
impressions. 

The end of the school was 
no different. To everyone it 
meant something else. 
Seniors concentrated on the 
day they could move their 
tassles from right to left. 
While straining to pull away 
from high school, they shied 
from freedom momentarily for 
a last look back. For 
underclassmen the move up 
meant having driver's 
licenses, getting first jobs, 



having tougher classes, or 
becoming a senior. 

And that is why no one 
noticed it anymore. The 
combination had been found 
expanding, changing and 
improving BR. The blue 
Shortrldge buttons were still 
there, and and traces of old 
grudges remained . . . Ripple 
was not perfect. But we 
didn't claim to be. With the 
help of 1900 individuals, 
Broad Ripple tried to 
transcend its problems and 
create a new school. We 
made . . . 




A WE 




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Marion County 
Public Library 



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